CRIME SCENE

Report
HONORS FORENSIC
SCIENCE
Who is Mrs. Kunkle??
Classroom Expectations
• You will have homework most nights
• You are expected to come in and start the
warm up that is on the board and copy the
essential questions onto your weekly
sheet. Start class ON TASK.
• You are expected to collaborate with
others at times, and at other times do your
own work. Cheating will not be tolerated.
• You are expected to act respectful to me
and each other. BE KIND ALWAYS.
Materials Needed
•
•
•
•
•
PENCIL
PEN
Composition Notebook for Labs
Paper
Binder or folder to keep ALL of our work
in. You will need to keep EVERYTHING!
syllabus
• Please follow along as I BREIFLY go over
the syllabus. I know you can read, so we
aren’t going to act like you can’t 
Movie Time
• You will get in a team of 5 AFTER I give
directions.
• Your task will be to make a short film on one of
the following topics:
– Lab Safety
– Team work in the classroom
– Technology in the classroom
– Respect in the classroom
• You will create a group check sheet that must
have three teacher initials before you get an
ipad to film
Team Checklist
• Brainstorm a list of the 10 points you will
include in your film
• Write out a summary of your plot, theme or
idea including what props you will need.
• Write script
• Film (you must have the above three
things written out and approved before
getting an ipad.
WARM UP
An inconsiderate slob dumped
trash on Rachel Rabbit's
lawn.
One of these two suspects is
guilty. Slylock Fox found
evidence that may identify
the loathsome litterbug.
What did Slylock observe to help him identify the trash tosser?
Hint: Notice the bones in the trash.
ESSENTIAL QUESTION: How has TV dramatized the duties of Crime Scene
Investigation? How Is real life different?
HOT Q1:Identify 3 negative CSI effects 3 positive CSI effects the author talks
about
HOT Q2: What are specific factors that true crime labs differ from than TV Crime
labs?
HOT Q3:
Source: http://www.slylockfox.com/arcade/BrainBogglers/index.html
Slylock found bones in the trash.
The bull is an herbivore and only eats plants.
The raccoon is an omnivore and eats both plants and
animals. The raccoon is the trash tosser.
You have about 45 minutes to
film!
Week 1 - Friday
Trivia! January 26
T. Trimpe 2006
http://sciencespot.net/
1. Ted Bundy was an American serial killer who was convicted on the
basis of which type of forensic evidence?
A. Bite marks
C. DNA fingerprinting
B. Latent fingerprints
D. Ballistics
2. The time of death can be calculated by various means. One is rigor
mortis, Latin for 'the stiffness of death'. Another indication is livor mortis
or lividity. What does this term refer to?
A. Cloudiness in the eyes
B. Gravitational pooling of blood
C. Degree of digestion of stomach contents
D. Relaxation of muscles following to rigor mortis
3. When attempting to identify a skeleton, craniofacial morphology (the
structure and form of the skull and face) is the best indicator of race.
One group of human beings has a unique, rounded jaw bone which is
called a 'rocker jaw'. This is a characteristic of which ethnic group?
A. Australian Aborigines
C. African Americans
B. Chinese
D. Hawaiians
1. Ted Bundy was an American serial killer who was convicted on the
basis of which type of forensic evidence?
A. Bite marks
Although he denied being the killer, Bundy made the mistake of biting one of
his victims. So although he lied through his teeth, his teeth marks didn’t lie!
2. The time of death can be calculated by various means. One is rigor
mortis, Latin for 'the stiffness of death'. Another indication is livor mortis
or lividity. What does this term refer to?
B. Gravitational pooling of blood
Livor is Latin for 'a black and blue spot' and refers to the discoloration of the
skin in the lowest part of a cadaver resulting from the gravitational pooling of
blood.
3. When attempting to identify a skeleton, craniofacial morphology (the
structure and form of the skull and face) is the best indicator of race.
One group of human beings has a unique, rounded jaw bone which is
called a 'rocker jaw'. This is a characteristic of which ethnic group?
D. Hawaiians - The 'rocker jaw' is so called because it will rock back and forth
like a rocking chair if gently pushed.
Forensic Science
T. Trimpe 2006 http://sciencespot.net
Warm Up January 27
David was sitting in his hotel room reading a book, when he heard a
knock at the door, and the sound of someone trying the door handle.
He opened the door, where he saw a man whom he had never seen
before.
The man said, "I'm terribly sorry ... I thought this was my room.
Wrong floor, I guess." He then walked off down the hall toward the
elevator.
David went back into his room, thought about what had just happened,
and then phoned the front desk, suggesting they call the police,
since the man at the door had obviously been a thief.
Why was David so sure the man had been a thief?
Essential Question: Who are the people that are most
important in approaching, preserving, and processing a
crime scene?
Source: http://www3.sc.maricopa.edu/ajs/crime_scene_technician.htm
Crime stats over the last 30
years
How many crimes are solved?
Watch the video and then answer the questions.
Video Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fGc4PaLB-ek
1. What crime lab did the reporter visit?
A. Chicago
B. New York
C. Las Vegas
2. How many hairs did the investigator use to help in getting a conviction in
the kidnapping/homicide case?
A. 3
B. 30
C. 300
3. True or False?
Real crime labs tend to be darker to make it easier to see evidence.
4. True or False?
It is possible to match any hair found at a crime scene to a specific person.
5. What must be present in a hair sample to test for DNA?
A. Shaft
B. Cuticle
C. Root
The answers are …
1. What crime lab did the reporter visit?
A. Chicago
B. New York
C. Las Vegas
2. How many hairs did the investigator use to help in getting a conviction in
the kidnapping/homicide case?
A. 3
B. 30
C. 300
3. True or False?
Real crime labs tend to be darker to make it easier to see evidence.
4. True or False?
It is possible to match any hair found at a crime scene to a specific person.
5. What must be present in a hair sample to test for DNA?
A. Shaft
B. Cuticle
C. Root
Crime Scene Vocabulary
CRIME SCENE: Any physical location in which a crime has occurred or is
suspected of having occurred.
PRIMARY CRIME SCENE: The original location of a crime or
accident.
SECONDARY CRIME SCENE: An alternate location where
additional evidence may be found.
SUSPECT: Person thought to be capable of committing a crime.
ACCOMPLICE: Person associated with someone suspected of committing a crime.
ALIBI: Statement of where a suspect was at the time of a crime.
Source: http://www3.sc.maricopa.edu/ajs/crime_scene_technician.htm
Types of Evidence
Testimonial evidence includes oral or written statements given to police as well as
court testimony by people who witnessed an event.
Physical evidence refers to any material items that would be present at the crime
scene, on the victims, or found in a suspect’s possession.
Trace evidence refers to physical evidence that is found in small but measurable
amounts, such as strands of hair, fibers, or skin cells.
What will evidence collected at a scene do for the investigation?
• May prove that a crime has been committed
• Establish key elements of a crime
• Link a suspect with a crime scene or a victim
• Establish the identity of a victim or suspect
• Corroborate verbal witness testimony
• Exonerate the innocent.
• Give detectives leads to work with in the case
Source: http://www3.sc.maricopa.edu/ajs/crime_scene_technician.htm
Crime Scene Personnel
POLICE OFFICERS are typically the first to arrive at a crime scene. They are
responsible for securing the scene so no evidence is destroyed and detaining
persons of interest in the crime.
The CSI UNIT documents the crime scene in detail and collects any physical
evidence.
The DISTRICT ATTORNEY is often present to help determine if any search
warrants are required to proceed and obtains those warrants from a judge.
The MEDICAL EXAMINER (if a homicide) may or may not be present to
determine a preliminary cause of death.
SPECIALISTS (forensic entomologists, anthropologists, or psychologists) may be
called in if the evidence requires expert analysis.
DETECTIVES interview witnesses and consult with the CSI unit. They
investigate the crime by following leads provided by witnesses and physical
evidence.
Source: http://science.howstuffworks.com/csi.htm
Crime Scene Protocol
Step 1: Interview
The first step in investigating a crime scene is to interview the first officer at the scene or the
victim to determine what allegedly happened, what crime took place, and how was the
crime committed. This information may not be factual information but it will give the
investigators a place to start.
Step 2: Examine
The second step in the investigation of a crime scene, which will help identify possible
evidence, identify the point of entry and point of exit, and outline the general layout of the
crime scene.
Step 3: Document
The third step in the protocol involves creating a pictorial record of the scene as well as a
rough sketch to demonstrate the layout of the crime scene and to identify the exact
position of the deceased victim or other evidence within the crime scene.
Step 4: Process
This is the last step in the protocol. The crime scene technician will process the crime scene
for evidence, both physical and testimonial evidence. It is the crime scene technicians
responsibility to identify, evaluate and collect physical evidence from the crime scene for
further analysis by a crime laboratory.
Adapted from http://www.feinc.net/cs-proc.htm
Ammunition
Blood
Blunt objects
Body fluids
Bullets
Cartridges
Computers
Controlled substances
Drugs
Explosion residue
Fibers
Finger print
Fire residue
Foot prints
Glass residue
Gun powder
Guns
Hairs
Hammer
Handwriting
Impressions
Ink
Insulation
Marijuana
Paint residue
Paper
Printers
Saliva
Screwdriver
Semen
Soils
Tool marks
Toxicology
Tire tracks
Wood fibers
With your group, place
these items into 9
groups and give them
a title.
Investigating the Evidence
Forensic Science disciplines at the
Illinois State Police Crime Labs
Drug Chemistry – Determines the presence of controlled substances and the identification
of marijuana
Trace Chemistry - Identification and comparison of materials from fires, explosions, paints,
and glass.
Microscopy – Microscopic identification and comparison of evidence, such as hairs, fibers,
woods, soils, building materials, insulation and other materials.
Biology/DNA – Analysis of body fluids and dried stains such as blood, semen, and saliva.
Toxicology – Tests body fluids and tissues to determine the presence of drugs and poisons.
Latent Prints - Identification and comparison of fingerprints or other hidden impressions
from sources like feet, shoes, ears, lips or the tread on vehicle tires.
Ballistics (Firearms) – Study of bullets and ammunition through the comparison of fired
bullets, cartridges, guns, and gunpowder patterns on people and objects.
Toolmarks – Examines marks left by tools on objects at a crime scene or on a victim, such
as a hammer used to break a door or a screwdriver used to pick a lock.
Questioned Documents - Examination of documents to compare handwriting, ink, paper,
writing instruments, printers, and other characteristics that would help to identify its origin.
Source: http://www.isp.state.il.us/forensics/
Pop Vocab Quiz
Definition
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
evidence includes oral or written statements
given to police as well as court testimony by
people who witnessed an event.
An alternate location where additional
evidence may be found.
is often present to help determine if any
search warrants are required to proceed and
obtains those warrants from a judge.
Statement of where a suspect was at the
time of a crime.
interview witnesses and consult with the
CSI unit. They investigate the crime by
following leads provided by witnesses and
physical evidence.
Person associated with someone suspected
of committing a crime.
Any physical location in which a crime has
occurred or is suspected of having occurred.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Word Bank
A. Primary Crime Scene
B. Trace Evidence
C. Secondary Crime
Scene
D. Physical Evidence
E. Testimonial Evidence
F. Detectives
G. Police Officers
H. District Attorney
I. Crime Scene
J. Accomplice
K. Alibi
Definition
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Pop Vocab Quiz
evidence includes oral or written statements
given to police as well as court testimony by
people who witnessed an event. (E)
An alternate location where additional
evidence may be found.(C)
is often present to help determine if any
search warrants are required to proceed and
obtains those warrants from a judge. (H)
Statement of where a suspect was at the time
of a crime. (K)
interview witnesses and consult with the CSI
unit. They investigate the crime by following
leads provided by witnesses and physical
evidence. (F)
Person associated with someone suspected of
committing a crime. (J)
Any physical location in which a crime has
occurred or is suspected of having
occurred.(A)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Word Bank
A. Primary Crime Scene
B. Trace Evidence
C. Secondary Crime
Scene
D. Physical Evidence
E. Testimonial Evidence
F. Detectives
G. Police Officers
H. District Attorney
I. Crime Scene
J. Accomplice
K. Alibi
Some people just don’t get it…
• http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b9kh5q
DjemI&feature=related
What evidence would you collect?
Mock Crime Scene: http://www.masss.gov
Exit Ticket
• Summarizing all of our discussions from
today, what are 2 things that are different
in TV Labs than Real-Life Labs.
homework
• http://www.virtualmuseum.ca/Exhibitions/
Myst/en/index.html
• Search virtual exhibits for “crime scene”
click on the brown box and play the game!
• It is called “Interactive Investigator”
• Write down your evidence and your
suspect.
Week 1 - Monday
CSI Challenge
Jan 28
Penny Challenge
Which is the correct penny?
NOTE: You cannot look at a real penny!
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Pros & Cons of
Testimonial Evidence
Presentation developed by T. Trimpe 2006 http://sciencespot.net/
Warm Up Jan 29
• Even if you AREN’t an artist…
– Try to draw your accountability partner. Look
for major features, like length of hair, how
close their eyes are, size of nose, size of lips,
etc. Give it your best shot!
• ESSENTIAL Question:
– How is testimonial evidence used to solve
cases?
What is testimonial evidence?
Testimonial evidence includes oral or written statements given to
police as well as testimony in court by people who witnessed an
event.
Eyewitness accounts can be a useful tool in helping investigators
with analyzing a crime scene, but are not viewed to be highly
reliable. In addition, eyewitness identifications (right or wrong) can
have a big influence on the outcome of an investigation or trial.
People are likely to view the same scene in different ways
depending on their positions, line of sight, familiarity with the area,
and other factors that can interfere with a person’s ability to
remember details.
The Bunny Effect
CBS News Video
Memory Challenge
Directions:
You will have 30 seconds to view the next screen.
Try to memorize all 20 items you see!
You are NOT allowed to write anything down
You CANNOT talk to anyone else.
Items to remember ...
Neuroscience for Kids - http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/puzmatch1.html
What do you remember?
You have 2 minutes to list as many of the items as you can!
How did you do?
All 20 – Awesome
15-19 – Great
10-14 – Pretty swell
5-9 – Could be better
4 or Less – Wake up
Did you know?
According to The Innocence Project (2008)
"Eyewitness misidentification is the single greatest
cause of wrongful convictions nationwide, playing a
role in more than 75% of convictions overturned
through DNA testing." Still, the criminal justice
system profoundly relies on eyewitness identification
and testimony for investigating and prosecuting crimes
(Wells & Olson, 2003).
What factors affect a person’s memory
and their ability to identify a suspect?
Source: http://www.helium.com/items/1276135-accurate-eyewitness-accounts
Witness Factors
• Age may play a role in the accuracy of an eyewitness’ statement or
identification of a suspect. Studies have shown that when a lineup
contains the actual culprit, both young children and elderly perform well,
but when the lineup does not contain the culprit there is a higher rate of
mistaken identifications.
• The race of the witness may also play a role. The Cross Race Effect
(CRE) is a phenomenon in which people are better at recognizing faces
of their own race rather than those of other races.
• The use of drugs can alter a person’s ability to recall the events of a
crime even after they are no longer under the influence.
• A person’s memory of an event can be influenced by other witnesses,
investigators, and/or the media. Investigators use open-ended questioning
and follow procedures for conducting line-ups to limit their influence on
a witness’ memory of an event or identification of a suspect.
Source: http://www.helium.com/items/1276135-accurate-eyewitness-accounts
Crime Scene & Suspect Factors
• A crime that is extremely traumatic for an eyewitness may affect his/her
recall of the event. For example, a witness confronted with a weapon
tends to focus on the weapon rather than the perpetrator’s face.
• Someone who is able to focus on a perpetrator's face for a minute or
longer will tend to have a more accurate memory than someone who saw
the person for only a few seconds.
• Studies have shown that faces that are either highly attractive, highly
unattractive, or distinctive are more likely to be accurately recognized.
Simple disguises, such as hats or sunglasses, can interfere with accurate
eyewitness identification. However, body piercings and tattoos increases
the likelihood of an accurate identification.
• The time of day in which the crime occurred as well as a person’s view
of the scene may affect what a he/she is able to see. In addition, a person
who is familiar with the area in which the crime took place, may have a
better recall of the positions of the victims or suspects.
Source: http://www.helium.com/items/1276135-accurate-eyewitness-accounts
Crime Scene Challenge
• Now that your eyes and brain are warmed up, let’s
test your observation skills a bit more.
• You will have 2 minutes to study the photograph of a
crime scene on the next slide.
• Try to pay attention to details as you will be asked 10
questions about the crime scene!
• You are not allowed to write anything down until
after the time is up.
• Ready?
Answer each question below.
1. What color coffee mug was in the picture?
2. When was the deadline?
Yesterday
Blue
Red
Today
3. What time was on the clock on the wall?
Tomorrow
10:40
11:05
4. How many sticky notes were on the whiteboard?
Four
7. What color was the victim's shirt?
Black
8. How many plants were in the picture?
None
Bill
Blue
10. Where was the book in the picture? On a box
Source: http://forensics.rice.edu/html/picture_begin.html
Eight
Trash Can
Brian
Printer
Carl
Red
One
9. What was the color of the marker in the desk drawer?
1:55
Six
5. Which of the following was NOT in the picture? Stapler
6. What was the name on the plaque on the desk?
Yellow
Two
Red
In the trash can
Blue
Green
Under the body
Facial Composites
Investigators work with sketch artists and eyewitnesses to create
facial composites, or sketches of a person’s face. Today many
police departments are using facial reconstruction software to
help them with this task.
The composite may be used internally to assist officers in
identifying the suspect or used externally through local media
(radio, TV, and newspaper) to solicit leads from citizens.
FACES – A software program that
offers many options to help you
recreate a person’s facial features.
The Art of Crime Detection
• Go to the following website and PLAY 
http://eduweb.com/portfolio/artofcrimedetection/
Week 1 - Thursday
Spot the Differences
Happy Birthday
Jan 30
Source:
http://www.slylockfox.com/arcade/6diff/index.html
Find the 6 differences between the two pictures.
Warm Up/Essential Question
• What are the 3 most important steps when
approaching a crime scene?
• What are the necessary parts of a crime
scene?
• Essential Question: How should evidence
be properly gathered from a crime scene?
The Crime Scene
bsapp.com
Approaching a Crime Scene
bsapp.com
Approaching a Crime
Scene
Personal Safety and the well
being of victims
Preserve and Isolate the
crime scene
Record the crime scene
bsapp.com
Recording the Crime
Scene
Photograph
s
Sketches
Notes
bsapp.com
Rough Sketch to Final
bsapp.com
Notes
Match to sketch
Use a key
Quick, short, bulleted
What can you not see
from the photo?
bsapp.com
Photography
Scene
Multiple
views
Entrances
Exits
Windows
Evidence
Close ups
Perspectives
Multiple
angles
bsapp.com
Consensus
Forensic science begins at the crime
scene, where investigators must recognize
and properly preserve evidence for
laboratory examination
The first officer to arrive must secure the
crime scene
Investigators record the crime scene by
using photographs, sketches, and notes
and make a preliminary examination of the
scene as the perpetrator left it.
Collecting Evidence
Victim's clothing
Fingernail scrapings
Head and pubic hairs
Blood (for typing purposes)
bsapp.com
Vaginal, anal, and oral swabs
Recovered bullets from the body
and/or surrounding area
Hand swabs or washings from
shooting victims
bsapp.com
Collecting Evidence
Bag
&
Tag
bsapp.com
Collecting Controls
Prints
DNA Samples
Hair
Other evidence from
possible suspects or victims
for comparison to evidence
bsapp.com
Take NOTES! You will need
them Monday….
• Get this off google drive 
Crime Scene Sketch Analysis
1. What is missing from this sketch? List as
many things as you can, and tell why they
are important.
2. What is done correctly and well? Why is it
important.
3. What other information would you like to
know about this crime scene.
4. Is this a rough sketch or a scale sketch?
Justify your answer.
5. Write a short story about what you think
happened here….be creative
Week 1 - Tuesday
Spot the Differences
Dinner Time
Source:
http://www.slylockfox.com/arcade/6diff/index.html
Feb 2
Find the 6 differences between the two pictures.
Bellwork Feb 3, 2015
• What did you ALL forget to include in your
rough sketch (look at your notes)
• Why is this important?
• Compare your sketch to somebody else’s
EQ: How can I make my rough sketch into a
good final scale sketch?
Bellwork Feb 4, 2015
• What are the qualities of a good crime scene
sketch?
• Why is it important that they be to scale and
accurate?
• Why are they important in addition to
photographs?
• Compare your sketch to somebody’s that was
not in your group. Give them constuctive and
positive feedback.
• EQ: What do I need to study for Friday’s
test????
Bellwork Feb 5, 2015
• Read the intro to Lyle and Louise, this is
the case we will be using.
• Write down any questions you have.
• We will do our first “Lab” next week with
this case.
• EQ: Why are ethics important as a crime
scene investigator?
CSI Web Adventures
• http://forensics.rice.edu/index.html
• 5 cases to solve
Homework:
Collecting Controls
What do You Need a
Warrant For?
bsapp.com
Happy Monday, Let’s look at a
REAL crime scene! Crime 360
• How does the fact that these are real
people affect how you will view this?
• How will you be respectful during this
viewing.
• If you are having trouble watching, what
should you do?
• EQ: How does a real CSI case differ from
CSI the TV show?
Questions about Crime 360/Exit
ticket
• What procedures that we have talked about in
class did you see detectives use?
• To get a more accurate view, detectives now
use the laser scan of a crime scene, eliminating
the need for crime scene sketches. How are
the laser scanners better than sketches? Are
there any down sides?
• Think about this show as a whole, how is it
different from an episode of CSI (or other
dramatized show you may have seen)? Which
do you like better?

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