Bio-economy Presentation - Animal Health Cluster 11 March 2014

Report
TheNational
B I O - E C O N O M Y S T R AT E G Y
Dr Maneshree Jugmohan-Naidu
D: Biotechnology
Content
1) Definition and Aims of the strategy
2) Timeline
3) Context
4) challenges/opportunities
5) Bio-economy Strategic Objectives
6) Defining progress
2
Bioeconomy Strategy 2013
"Bioeconomy" refers to
activities that make use of
bio-innovations, based on
biological sources,
materials and processes to
generate sustainable
economic, social and
environmental development.
Aims of the Bio-economy Strategy:
•
•
•
•
Provides an economic engine for the new economy which will in turn
provide a basis for future growth.
Science-based "biosolutions" can be used to, for instance –
– manufacture high-value protein products such as
biopharmaceuticals and vaccines;
– produce biofuels;
– improve and adapt crops;
– remedy industrial and municipal waste;
– reduce production costs;
– reduce environmental impacts;
– improve improve the global competitiveness in the health,
agriculture and industrial sector the quality of products;
– improve the performance of a range of economic sectors.
A key objective is incorporating market pull into innovation activities
Allows SA to respond more directly to global challenges such as the
disease burden, food security, competitive industry, climate change and
energy requirements as well as to maximise local beneficiation,
improved quality of life and economic growth.
Linked to other policies
Timeline
Nat Biotech
Strategy
2001
2009 Outputs:
Instruments:
BRICs; NBN;
PUB 2003
•
14 platforms established
•
73 projects funded
•
Investment into 31 companies
•
221 products & 142 services
•
940 jobs
•
439 bursaries/indirect study
support
•
R247 mill leveraged (on R1 bill)
Bioeconomy
5% of GDP
2050
Incorporation
of ‘learnings’
Merge into
TIA 2009
Bio-economy
Strategy
development
2009-2013
Functioning
NSI 2020
6
Value
Chain
Performers
Funding
Agencies
Outputs
Biotech Landscape
Basic
Applied
Tech Develop Commercial
Where to Next: Strategy to strengthen the Bioeconomy…….
Universities
Industry
Science Councils
Service Platforms
SARChI
CoE
Centres of Competence/Platforms
NIPMO
NRF
Publications/new knowledge/HCD
TIA/DST
IDC
Patents/new knowledge products
SWOT Analysis – SA NSI
Strengths
 Government commitment to
The Bio-economy through its
policies/strategies and funding
 ‘Mega’ biodiversity
 Strong academic environment
 Excellent infrastructure
 Extensive Indigenous Knowledge
 Stable political environment
and growing economy
 Emerging small companies
Weaknesses
 Fragmented NSI - Researchers do not work together to
conceptualise bigger projects which take into the value
chain pipeline Innovation culture
 Public Awareness
 Water scarce country
 Extended times for regulatory approval
 Lack of skilled, qualified and experienced personnel
 Intellectual property management
 Entrepreneurial culture at universities and public research
institutions underdeveloped
 Small biotechnology companies are not self sustainable,
relying on Government funding.
Opportunities
Threats
 Private sector involvement in the implementation of Loss of skilled, qualified and experienced human
Government policies/strategies
resources to othercountries
 Private sector willingness to train postgraduate students in
Bio-entrepreneurship
 Climate Change
 International investment
 Emerging venture capitalists
 Aging skills
 Other Government’s Departments willing to be involved in
the development of the Bio-economy
CONTEXT: Key features of
SA Bio-economy’s NSI
o Portfolio Analysis Findings:
o Investments at HEI’s & SC’s:
o Disruptive innovation.
o Don’t advance to market.
o Companies:
o Incremental innovation
o IP based companies
succeed vs. non-IP based.
9
Challenges/opportunities
•
Large but under-employed rural communities
•
High burden of disease, excellence in R&D, but underinvestment in innovation opportunities
•
Increasing global food quality standards
•
Under-utilised – but substantial - livestock populations
•
Need for continual improvement of commercially-relevant
plants & animals
•
Need to revitalise certain labour-intensive industries to
maintain global competitiveness – eg. sugar; forestry
•
Carbon footprint / green economy
•
•
Commercialise& mainstream IKS biodiversity products
Climate Change
10
Bio-economy
Approach
Manage NSI according to industry
sectors, and incorporate value
chain approach
Three thematic chapters:
• Agriculture
•
Health
•
Industry & Environment
Enabling
Environment
Develop &
Demonstrate
Commercialise
Transfer &
Adoption
through
partnerships
11
Bio-economy: Agriculture
Ensure food security, enhance nutrition and improve health and enable
job creation through expansion and intensification of sustainable
agricultural production and processing.
• Strategic projects
– Crop/livestock improvement both for biotic and physical stresses associated with
climate change (including indigenous crops)
– Agroprocessing initiatives
– An integrated food nutrition research programme
– Animal vaccine capabilities
– Energy-crop initiatives
– Biocontrol and biofertilisers
– Aquaculture
– Soil conservation
– Water resource management
• Build high-value skills and capacities to enable agro-innovation
• Co-funding initiatives for innovation
Bioeconomy: Health Sector
Support and strengthen the country's local RDI capabilities to
manufacture APIs, vaccines, biopharmaceuticals, diagnostics and
medical devices to address the disease burden while ensuring security
of supply of essential therapeutics and prophylactics.
Strategic projects
• Develop improved therapeutics and drug delivery systems to
address priority diseases – including African Traditional Medicines
• Develop new and improved vaccines and biologics
• Develop improved diagnostics
• Develop improved medical devices
• Build clinical research and development capabilities
• Establish pharmaceutical manufacturing
Bio-economy: Industry and Environment
Support research, development and innovation in biological
processes for the production of goods and services, while
enhancing water and waste-management practices to
support green economy.
Strategic projects
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Strategic industrial biotechnology programmes
Strengthen and develop bioprospecting capacity and capabilities
Strengthen local bioprocessing capabilities
Develop integrated biorefineries from bio-based feedstocks
Strengthen wastewater research, development and innovation
Strengthen waste research, development and innovation
Synergies with enabling and emerging technologies.
Establish an advisory committee for industrial bio-economy
Industrial bio-economy
Industrial applications
Bio-based
chemicals
Bio-materials
Bulk and
speciality
chemicals
Sustainable Environmental
Management
Bio-energy
Biodiesel
Biocatalysts
Biocomposites
Bioethanol
Biocontrol
products
Biopolymers
Biobutanol
Biogas
Water
Bioremediation of
domestic and
industrial
wastewater
Waste
Bioleaching
Biometallurgy
Biosorption
Additives
Enabling technologies
Biocatalysis
15
Industry
REGULATION
Human health products (MCC); Food
products (Codex); GMO products (GMO
Act); Biocontrol (Act 36) etc
The Market
Government
SERVICES
Commercial
products
Skills & Human
and services
Capital
REGULATORY COMPLIANCE
Commercialise
IP PROTECTION
(Exploit IP)
(BiosafetySA; clinical trialing;
preclinical platform)
(NIPMO)
Biodiversity Regulations
(access & benefit sharing)
INCUBATION
Innovate
(Facilities; business &marketing skills)
(Develop IP)
MTAs/ Genomic Sovereignty
PILOT SCALE PRODUCTION
Applied
Research
(Current Skills)
Research Ethics
(bio-processing; bio-fermentation;
bio-pharming)
TECHNOLOGY SERVICES
(Genomics; Proteomics;
Metabolomics; Metagenomics;
Bioinformatics; etc)
BioDesign
(Future Skills)
BIO-REPOSITORY
(Human;Animal; Plant; Microbes)
Coordinating Committees
Role of DST – Key strategic objectives
•
•
Coordinate stakeholders and role players.– Promote active participation of ALL stakeholders is key towards successful
implementation, performance objectives and milestones – hence the
coordination committees
– Coordination of projects across value chain (networking of, & value-addition to,
projects)
– Orchestration of RDI innovators (incl. Technology Platforms; Team SA)
– Alignment of RD&I with industry and govt. needs
Develop strategic innovation competencies.
– Development of the full value chain from concept to product.
– Bioinformatics, functional genomics, structural biology, synthetic biology and
systems biology.
– Technology service platforms.
– Pilot-scale infrastructure.
– Incubation facilities.
– Financing.
– Human capital development – capital resources not just financially but also
multidisciplinary expertise
– Instruments to address specific knowledge needs.
– Knowledge management to develop a bioportal.
Role of DST – Key strategic objectives, contd.
• Develop strategic innovation programmes to address strategic gaps
or opportunities for the country
– Identify and drive RD&I in long-term programmes which address
National priorities
– HIV / AIDS [existing initiatives: DST/MRC - SHIP; SHARP], TB
[DST/MRC – SHIP; SATRI]
– Ongoing crop/animal improvement [ARC; TIA]
– Mainstreaming indigenous products and agricultural goods
[IKS; ARC; CSIR; TIA]
– Strengthening Industry (revitalisation with alternative, competitive
products & processes based on biotechnologies) [Eucalyptus Forestry;
Sugarcane Industry; Waste treatment; Biocatalysis; TIA & CSIR]
18
Indicators (to be informed by study)
Bioeconomy
HCD
R&D
Commercialisation
Coordination
Bioeconomy
contribution to GDP
Student outputs per
year
No. of publications
and citations in highimpact journals per
capita.
No. of products and
services
No. of collaborative
research
partnerships
Technology balance
of payment of bioinnovation outputs.
Throughput of nonacademic skills
training (incl.
entrepreneurialism)
Cumulative no. of biopatents / plant
breeders rights
No. of start up
companies
No of companies
reaching break even
No. of
collaborativeproduc
t development
partnerships
No.of bio-innovation
firms, including
dedicated bioinnovation firms by
sector
Size of bioworkforce as
percentage of S&T
workforce.
No.of regulatory
approvals for locally
produced
health/agricultural
products.
No. multinational
corporations in bioeconomy sectors
locating R & D
facilities locally
No. of funding
partnerships
Leveraging
international
resources
No. of projects
progressing
between funding
institutions
No. of regulatory
approvals for locally
produced
health/agricultural
products.
19
Thank you!
Maneshree Jugmohan-Naidu
@dst.gov.za
20

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