OFF-ICE TRAINING

Report
STRENGTH TRAINING
FUNDAMENTALS
DARRYL NELSON
TRAINING RESOURCES

www.hockeystrengthandconditioning.com









www.strengthcoach.com
Advances in Functional Training by Boyle
Brawn by McRobert
Athletic Body in Balance by Cook
New Rules of Lifting by Cosgrove
Core Performance by Verstegan
Easy Strength by Dan John
[email protected]
www.youtube.com/user/darryln75
SKILL & TALENT
The Little Book of Talent by Coyle
 The Talent Code by Coyle
 Talent is Overrated by Colvin
 Outliers by Gladwell
 Spark by Ratey

FOOD & NUTRITION
The Paleo Solution by Wolf
 The Omnivore’s Dilemma by Pollan
 Ultraprevention by Hyman and Liponis
 The Vegetarian Myth by Keith
 The End of Overeating by Kessler

FUNCTIONAL TRAINING
Train what you see in sports. Functional
training just make sense.
 What are the demands of sport? Does
long distance training make sense?
 Does quick feet training make sense?
Does high rep weight training make
sense? What about muscle fiber type?
 Does machine training make sense?
 Your ice hockey players are sprinters!

FREE/BODY WEIGHT







Training should be 3-D & involve coordination
& body awareness.
Multi-joint exercises & multi-planar movements
Single extremity exercises.
Strength and power oriented.
Olympic lifting, squatting, pulling, resisted
running
Putting force into the ice is the most important
aspect of skating fast
Ask what does hockey really demand
EXERCISE

Weyland Study: Faster Top Running Speeds
are Achieved with Greater Ground Forces Not
More Rapid Leg Movements. Weyland, P., Sternlight, D.,
Bellizzi, M., Wright, S., Journal of Applied Physiology, 89: 1991-1999, 2000
 Tabata
.
Study: 6 weeks of training for 1 hour, 5
days a week, at 70% vo2max resulted in smaller
gains in vo2max and anaerobic power than
performing 8 sets of 20s intervals followed by 10s
of rest. Tabata, I., Nishimura, K., Kousaki, M., et al. (1996). Effects of
moderate-intensity endurance and high-intensity intermittent training on
anaerobic capacity and VO2max. Medicine and Science in Sports and
Exercise, 28(10), 1327-1330.
HOCKEY PHYSIOLOGY
In the 1920s the average body mass was approximately 75 kg.
In 2003 the average mass was 92 kg. This increase of 17 kg
represented a 23% gain in mass that appears to be in the form
of muscle tissue.
 There are many factors contributing to the increasing size of the
players. Players are assessed by scouts on 10 task
requirements with size and strength and aggressiveness and
toughness being part of the selection process. Other factors
include increased time spent in training, particularly strength
training. In recent years, Teams have added fitness and
strength specialists to the coaching staff. Most NHL teams,
including the Canadiens, have in house facilities containing
excellent equipment for physical development for the players.
 Physiological profile of professional hockey payers.
2006 NRC Canada. D.L. Montgomery.

Acceleration
STRENGTH & POWER
Strength Training

similar documents