Shipping Division 6.2 Dangerous Goods, Patient Specimens & Dry Ice

Report
Shipping Division 6.2
Dangerous Goods,
Patient Specimens
& Dry Ice
August 2012
Topics
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Category A Infectious substances
Category B Infectious substances
Exempt patient specimens
Genetically modified organisms
Dry ice
Liquid nitrogen dry shippers
Liquid nitrogen wet shippers
Limited and excepted quantities of some dangerous goods
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Course Outline
• Training and testing is mandatory for shippers
• Potential liabilities both criminal and civil
• This training is designed to meet the training and testing
requirements as set forth in the regulations
• Guidance tools including flow charts for interpretation
• A series of quizzes to test your progress
• A comprehensive final exam
• Upon course completion, you will receive a printed
training record/certificate
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Course Objectives
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Apply dangerous goods regulations correctly
Explain the legal aspects
Explain responsibilities
Identify hazards both visible & hidden
Decide which substances are dangerous goods
Select proper packaging
Properly pack dangerous goods
Mark & label packages
Complete shipping documentation
Accept or reject shipments
Know your employer's responsibilities regarding a security plan
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Chapter 1
Regulations
Hazardous Materials Regulations
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Dangerous Goods Regulations
National and international regulatory bodies
Harmonization
Training
Testing, certification and recordkeeping
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Dangerous Goods
Regulations
• Dangerous goods can cause harm if they are
involved in an accident or incident
• Dangerous goods, hazardous materials and
hazmat all mean the same thing
• Regulations apply to transport of dangerous goods by air,
rail, road or vessel
• International and national guidelines may be different
• Differences between regulations can cause problems
• Harmonization relieves these problems
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
International Regulation Bodies
• United Nations Committee of Experts (UNCOE)
• UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods Model
Regulations (UN Model Regulations)
• International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) publishes Technical
Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air (ICAO TI)
• The UN Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) publishes the
International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Rail (RID)
• The European Agreement concerning the International Carriage of
Dangerous Goods by Road (ADR)
• The International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code published by the
International Maritime Organization (IMO) regulates for the International
Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS)
• The Universal Postal Union (UPU) publishes The Letter Post Manual
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
UNCOE
United Nations Committee
of Experts
ICAO
International Civil
Aviation Organization
publishes Technical
Instructions (ICAO TI)
UPU
The Universal Postal
Union (UPU)
publishes The Letter
Post Manual
49 CFR
Title 49 Code of
Federal Regulations
UNECE
The UN Economic
Commission for Europe
publishes the International
Carriage of Dangerous
Goods by Rail (RID)
IATA DGR
International Civil Aviation
Organization Dangerous
Goods Regulations
TDGR Canada
Transportation of
Dangerous Goods
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
IATA
• Regulations for air transport are more restrictive
• Delta Airlines, United Airlines, Air Canada, Air France,
Lufthansa and freight carriers such as Fed Ex, and UPS, etc.
are members of IATA
• IATA works with the airlines to improve safety and
efficiency in the transportation of dangerous goods
• The IATA DGR is in full compliance with the ICAO TI
• IATA dangerous goods regulations apply to anyone who
offers a consignment of dangerous goods to an IATA
member airline or air carrier (IATA DGR 1.2.1)
• IATA DGR are the set of guidelines for IATA members
• IATA is the most restrictive set of guidelines
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
National Regulations
• The US Department of Transportation (DOT) publishes the Title
49 Transportation of the Code of Federal Regulations (49 CFR)
• Parts 100-185 of the 49 CFR or Hazardous Materials Regulations
(HMR) http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=ecfr&tpl=%2Findex.tpl
• The HMR governs shipment of dangerous goods by air, rail, road
and sea
• The HMR is in harmony with UN Model Regulations
• The HMR recognizes the ICAO TI for air shipments, as long as
US variations are also followed (49 CFR 171.22)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
National Regulations
• Violations can result in a
civil penalty up to $50,000
• Criminal penalty up to
$500,000 and/or 5 years in
jail
• Penalties double when the
violation results in serious
injury or death
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Training
Who needs to be trained?
► Anyone who handles, offers for transport or transports
dangerous goods
Who certifies that a dangerous goods employee is
trained?
► Employers are responsible for the training of those who
handle, offer for transport or transport dangerous goods
What sort of test is required for certification?
► Testing may be performance, written and/or verbally based
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Training
There are four required areas of training
1. General Awareness/Familiarization Training
– Provides familiarity with general requirements of
dangerous goods regulations, and enables the employee to
recognize and identify hazardous materials
2. Function Specific Training
– Training that specifically addresses or is applicable to the
functions the employee performs
• ICAO and IATA use a table to outline some of the
specific aspects of the regulations that are required for
different positions.
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Training
3. Safety Training
– Each dangerous goods employee shall receive
safety training in the following three areas:
• Emergency response information required by 49
CFR 172.600-172.606
• Protection from the risks associated with the
hazardous materials that an employee will be
working with
• Accident avoidance
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Training
4. Security Awareness Training
– Security training for appropriate hazardous
material, including recognizing possible
security threats
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Recordkeeping
• A record of training must be created and maintained for all
dangerous goods employees
• The record must be retained for 36 months from the most
recent training completion date (ICAO 1;4.25, IATA 1.5.5.2)
• Retained for as long as the employee is employed and 90
days after (49 CFR 172.704(d))
• The record of training must include:
– The employee's name; most recent completion date of the employee's
training; description, copy, or the location of the training materials
used to meet the requirements,; name and address of the organization
providing the training; evidence that the employee has been trained
and tested.
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Testing and Certification
• The final exam at the end of this training will meet
the regulatory testing requirement
• The training certificate provided, plus retention of
this training material, constitutes a valid "record of
training“
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For how long is training valid for?
• ICAO/IATA require recurrent training every two
years (ICAO 1;4.2.3/IATA 1.5.0.3)
– Recent amendments to recurrent training (ICAO 1;4.2.3
IATA 1.5)
– Recurrent training that is conducted within the final 3
months of the 24-month period will be considered to
have been completed on the expiry date of the 24month period
• DOT requires recurrent training every three years
[49 CFR 172.704(c)(2)]
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Chapter 1 Review
• The national and international regulatory
bodies
• Harmonization of the regulations
• Training requirements
• Training certificates
• Recurrent training requirements
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Chapter 2
Introduction to Shipping
Topics to Discuss
• The shipper or consignor
• The operator or carrier
• The consignee or receiver
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Shipper’s Responsibilities
• The shipper prepares the shipment
• The shippers and operators have
regulated responsibilities
• Shipper must be aware of any changes
in the regulations
• Shipper's responsibilities include:
– Classification, Identification, Packaging,
Marking and Labeling, Documentation,
Import/Export Permits, and State and
Operator variations
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Operator’s
Responsibilities
• Operators (carriers) move the shipment
• The operator is responsible for the acceptance,
handling, loading, transporting and delivery
• Acceptance of a package by an operator transfers
some liability to the operator
• Operators are the last line of defense against the
transport of improperly prepared packages
• Operators use a checklist to check for errors
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Operator’s
Responsibilities
• Operator checklist will look for proper:
– Documentation, Quantity, Marking and Labeling, Proper
packaging for its intended use, visible leaks or damage
• An operator may refuse a package even if it is packed,
labeled and documented correctly.
– ICAO 7;(i) Nothing in the regulations should be interpreted
as requiring an operator to transport a particular article
or substance, or, as preventing an operator from imposing
special requirements on the transport of a particular
article or substance. (IATA 9.1.3)
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Consignee’s Responsibilities
• Inspect packages upon arrival
• If a package of Infectious substances is damaged or leaks
during transport, the consignee should report it to the
proper authorities (Incident reporting is discussed in
Chapter 8)
• Verify that the itemized list of contents is accurate
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Chapter 2 Review
• Shipper Responsibilities for:
– Classification, Identification, Packaging, Marking and
Labeling, Documentation, Other arrangements
• Operator Responsibilities
• Suggestions for the Consignee
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Chapter 3
Classification
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Topics to Discuss
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•
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•
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Dangerous goods
9 Classes of dangerous goods
Infectious substances
Exemptions
Dry ice
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Dangerous Goods
• ICAO TI 1;3.2 - dangerous goods " ... articles or substances
which are capable of posing a risk to health, safety, property or
the environment and which are shown in the List of Dangerous
Goods in these instructions (Regulations) or which are classified
according to these instructions (Regulations)"(IATA DGR 1.0)
• 49 CFR 105.5 The DOT defines hazardous material as "… a
substance or material that the Secretary of Transportation has
determined is capable of posing an unreasonable risk to health,
safety, and property when transported in commerce... The term
includes hazardous substances, hazardous wastes, marine
pollutants, elevated temperature materials, materials designated
as hazardous in the Hazardous Materials Table (see 49 CFR
172.101)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Hidden Dangerous Goods
• Unmarked, improperly packaged hidden dangerous goods
have the potential to cause catastrophic problems in air
transport
• There are numerous personnel who are specially trained at
detecting hidden dangerous goods
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Hidden Dangerous Goods
• ICAO 7;6.1/IATA 2.2 maintains a list of common
hidden dangerous goods. The list includes:
– Dry ice, camping equipment, repair kits, wheel
chairs, diving lights, strike anywhere matches
NOTE: Infectious agents, blood, body fluids, tissues,
cultures and other potentially biohazardous materials
must NEVER be carried onto an airplane in either
checked or carry-on baggage.
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Forbidden Dangerous Goods
• All infectious substances are allowed to be
transported by air
• Since not all operators accept infectious
substances, check if they will accept your
shipment
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
List of Dangerous Goods
• Many dangerous goods are listed by their common name; for example,
Ethanol
• Proper shipping name
• UN number
• Both the proper shipping name and UN number are the same in all
regulations
• The list is the key to dangerous good regulations
• List of Dangerous Goods on blue pages of ICAO TI and IATA DGR
• DOT list of hazardous material is found in the 49 CFR section 172.100
• Infectious substances are on the List of Dangerous Goods
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Classes of Dangerous Goods
• Class 1-Explosives
• Class 2-Gases
• Class 3-Flammable
Liquids
• Class 4-Flammable Solids
• Class 5-Oxidizing
Substances & Organic
Peroxides
• Class 6-Toxic &
Infectious Substances
• Class 7-Radioactive
Materials
• Class8-Corrosives
• Class 9-Miscellaneous
Dangerous Goods
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Classes of Dangerous Goods
• If a dangerous good can be classified under two different
classes, the most dangerous class is listed as the primary
class and the less dangerous class is listed as the subsidiary
risk
• NOTE: The numbers indicate the Class not the degree of
danger.
• This training focuses on:
– Division 6.2 - Infectious substances
– Class 9 - Genetically modified organisms
– Class 9 - Dry ice
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Classification of Biological
Substances
• Category A Infectious substances - high consequence, high containment,
life-threatening pathogens
• Category B Infectious substances - moderately hazardous and/or potentially
pathogenic substances
• Exempt human/animal specimens - human and animal specimens with
minimal likelihood of a pathogen
• Unrestricted biological materials - those that are known to be free of
pathogens or are expressly excepted from the regulations
• Genetically modified organisms and micro-organisms - non-pathogenic
organisms that are capable of altering animals, plants or microbial
substances in a way which is not normally the result of natural reproduction
• Medical or clinical waste - wastes derived from the medical treatment of
animals or humans or from bio-research
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Key Definitions
• Infectious substances are substances which are known or
reasonably expected to contain pathogens. Pathogens are
defined as micro-organisms (including bacteria, viruses,
rickettsiae, parasites, fungi) and other agents such as prions,
which can cause disease in humans or animals. (ICAO
2;6.3.1.1/IATA 3.6.2.1.1)
• Cultures are the result of a process by which pathogens are
intentionally propagated. This definition does not include
patient specimens as defined below. (ICAO2;6.3.1.3 /IATA
3.6.2.1.3)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Key Definitions
• Patient specimens are those collected directly from humans or
animals, including but not limited to, excreta, secreta, blood and
its components, tissue and tissue fluid swabs, and body parts
being transported for purposes such as research, diagnosis,
investigational activities, disease treatment and prevention.
(ICAO 2;6.3.1.4/ IATA 3.6.2.1.4)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Key Definitions
Regulations divide infectious substances into two categories,
Category A and Category B. However, it is necessary to
understand the following definitions before selecting categories:
• Category A: An infectious substance which is transported in a
form that, when exposure to it occurs, is capable of causing
permanent disability, life-threatening or fatal disease in
otherwise healthy humans or animals. The table of Indicative
examples of Category A Infectious substances includes
examples which meet this criteria. (ICAO 2;6.3.2.2.1/ IATA
3.6.2.2.2.1)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Key Definitions
• Category B: An infectious substance which does not meet the
criteria for inclusion in Category A. (ICAO 6;3.2.2.2/ IATA
3.6.2.2.2.2)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Exempt Patient
Specimens
• Patient specimens are those which are
taken directly from a human or animal
• Patient specimens for which there is minimal
likelihood that pathogens are present are not subject
to these Instructions (Regulations) if the specimen is
packed (properly)... and is marked with the words
"Exempt human specimen" or "Exempt animal
specimen", as appropriate. (ICAO 6;3.2.3.6 / IATA
3.6.2.2.3.6)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Examples of Exempt patient
specimens include:
• Blood or urine tests to monitor: Cholesterol levels,
Blood glucose levels, Hormone levels, Prostate
specific antigens
• Tests required to monitor organ functions
• Tests required for insurance or employment purposes
• Pregnancy tests
• Cancer biopsies
• Antibody detection
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
The Difference Between Category B
Infectious Substances and Exempt
Patient Specimens
• In order for a sample to be classified as an Exempt patient
specimen it must fulfill two requirements:
– It must be a specimen taken directly from a human or animal.
Cultures from patient specimens are not exempt
– Professional judgment has been made to confirm that it does not
contain a pathogen
• If a patient specimen is being transported for nondiagnostic purposes and the source patient is known to be
infected with a pathogen then the sample must be classified
as a Category A or B Infectious substance as appropriate
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Non-Regulated Biological
Substances
• Exceptions from the regulations
• A substance is excepted from the
regulations if it does not need to be
classified or packaged as a dangerous good
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Non-Regulated Biological
Substances (Exceptions)
• Substances which do not contain infectious substances, or
substances which are unlikely to cause disease in humans
or animals. (ICAO 6;3.2.3.1 /IATA 3.6.2.2.3.1)
• Substances which contain micro-organisms that are nonpathogenic to humans or animals. (ICAO 6;3.2.3.2 /IATA
3.6.2.2.3.2)
• Substances in a form that any present pathogens have been
neutralized or inactivated such that they no longer pose a
health risk. (ICAO 6;3.2.3.3 /IATA 3.6.2.2.3.3)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Non-Regulated Biological
Substances (Exceptions)
• Environmental samples (including food and water
samples) which are not considered to pose a significant
risk of infection. (ICAO 6;3.2.3.4 /IATA 3.6.2.2.3.4)
• Dried blood spots collected by applying a drop of blood
onto absorbent material, or faecal occult blood screening
tests and blood or blood components which have been
collected for the purposes of transfusion or for the
preparation of blood products to be used for transfusion or
transplantation and any tissues or organs intended for use
in transplantation. (ICAO 6;3.2.3.5 / IATA 3.6.2.2.3.5)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Other Biological
Material
•
ICAO 6;3.3 /IATA 3.6.2.3 Biological products are
divided into the following groups:
– Those which are manufactured and packaged in accordance with
the requirements of appropriate national authorities and transported
for the purposes of final packaging or distribution, and used for
personal health care by medical professionals or individuals.
Substances in this group are not subject to these Instructions
– Those which do not fall under the above designation and are
known or reasonably believed to contain infectious substances and
which meet the criteria for inclusion in Category A or Category B
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Medical or Clinical Waste
• Medical or clinical waste are wastes derived
from the medical treatment of animals or
humans or from bio-research. Examples
include: waste bandages, waste stocks and
cultures, sharps waste, etc.
• Waste containing Category A Infectious
substances must be classified as Category A
infectious substances
• Waste containing Category B Infectious
substances must be classified as Medical or
Clinical wastes
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Genetically Modified
Organisms
• Genetically modified organisms are organisms which
have been purposely altered through genetic engineering
in a way that does not occur naturally
• Genetically modified micro-organisms that can cause
disease in humans or animals (pathogens) must be
classified as either Category A or Category B Infectious
substances and shipped accordingly
• Non-pathogenic genetically modified organisms that are
capable of altering animals, plants or microbiological
substances in a way which is not normally the result of
natural reproduction are considered Class 9
Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
• A sample of a patient's blood containing HIV
– Category B
• A sample of a patient's blood suspected to
contain Ebola virus
– Category A
• A whole kidney being sent for transplantation
– Not Regulated
• A culture of Hepatitis B from a sample of a
patient's blood
– Category A
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Review
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•
•
•
•
•
List of Dangerous Goods
The nine classes of dangerous goods
Classification of infectious substances
Exemptions to the regulations
Biological products and medical waste
Class 9 Miscellaneous Dangerous goods
– Genetically modified organisms
– Dry ice
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Chapter 4
Identification
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Topics to Discuss
• List of Dangerous Goods
• The columns in the List of Dangerous Goods,
including:
–
–
–
–
Proper shipping names and UN numbers
State and operator variations
Special provisions
Packing groups
• Infectious substance identification
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Proper Shipping Name
• A dangerous good must only be assigned one proper shipping
name
• The proper shipping name is written in bold faced type.
Portions of the entry not bolded are not considered part of the
proper shipping name but are permitted
– Use the full name - Abbreviations are NOT allowed; Both singular or
plural forms are accepted. For example: substance or substances either is correct
• Generic proper shipping names
– n.o.s. - not otherwise specified; Flammable liquid, toxic n.o.s.;
Example - a mixture of gasoline and carbon tetrachloride
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Technical Names
• Technical names must be entered in brackets
immediately following the proper shipping
name
• The technical name must be a recognized
chemical name or name currently used in
scientific and technical handbooks, journals
and texts
• Trade names are not acceptable as a technical
name
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
UN Numbers
• Proper shipping names and UN numbers
are standard internationally
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Special Provisions
• They are found in the List of Dangerous
Goods and only apply to the proper
shipping name where they are listed
– UN 2814 Infectious substances, affecting
humans - special provisions A81 and A140
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Packing Groups
• Packing group I - Substances presenting
high danger
• Packing group II - Substances presenting
medium danger
• Packing group III - Substances presenting
low danger
Example - Flammable liquid, toxic n.o.s. can be divided into
packing group I, II or III
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
State and Operator Variations
• ICAO and IATA allow countries (State) and airlines, air
carriers, or couriers (Operator) to submit variations to the
regulations. If a variation is less restrictive; it is mentioned
as information only
• US(G)-United States, CA(G)-Canada, FR(G)-France, FXFedEx, 5X- United Parcel Service
• Be aware of any variations affecting your shipment
– For example, a shipment of dangerous goods being sent from
Mexico City, Mexico to Ottawa, Canada by United Airlines, the
shipper must follow all applicable variations for Mexico, United
States, Canada and United Airlines.
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
State and Operator Variation
Examples
• ES(G)-01 In domestic transport and in international transport
originating in Spain, Spanish shall be used in all markings and
on the Shipper's Declaration for Dangerous Goods, in addition
to the language required by the States of transit and destination
• CA(G)-05 Infectious substances are not permitted in the mail in
Canada
• FX-09 Division 6.2 items classified as Risk Group 4 by the
World Health Organization (WHO) will not be accepted for
carriage
• AC-01 Advanced arrangements must be made for all shipments
of dangerous goods as defined in these regulations
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Infectious Substance
Identification
• Category A has two proper shipping names
– UN 2814 Infectious substance, affecting humans
– UN 2900 Infectious substance, affecting animals
• Category B Infectious Substances
– UN 3373 Biological substance, Category B
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Medical and Clinical Waste
UN 3291
• Medical or clinical wastes containing Category A Infectious
substances must be assigned to UN 2814 or UN 2900 as appropriate.
Medical or clinical wastes containing Infectious substances in
Category B must be assigned to UN 3291. (ICAO 2;6.3.5.1 /IATA
3.6.2.5.1
• Medical or clinical wastes that are reasonably believed to have a low
probability of containing Infectious substances must be assigned to UN
3291. (ICAO 2;6.3.5.2 /IATA 3.6.2.5.2)
• Decontaminated medical or clinical wastes which previously contained
infectious substances are not subject to these Instructions (Regulations)
unless they meet the criteria for inclusion in another class. (ICAO
2;6.3.5.2 /IATA 3.6.2.53)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Genetically Modified Organisms
& Dry Ice
• UN 3245 Genetically modified organism
• UN 3245 Genetically modified micro-organism
• NOTE: Genetically modified organisms are not
assigned technical names.
• UN 1845 Dry ice
• UN 1845 Carbon dioxide, solid
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Review
• List of Dangerous Goods
– Proper shipping names, UN numbers, Hazard
labels, Special provisions, Packing groups,
State and operator variations
• Proper shipping names and UN numbers
– Infectious substances, Genetically modified
organisms, Dry ice
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Chapter 5
Packing
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Topics to Discuss
•
•
•
•
•
Quantity limits from the list of Dangerous Goods
Packing instructions
Packing - Packaging – Package
Triple packaging
Detailed instructions for packing:
– Category A Infectious substances
– Category B Infectious substances
– Exempt patient specimens
– Genetically modified organisms
• Refrigerants
• Small quantities of dangerous goods
• Overpacks
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Quantity Limits
• Quantity limits are per package, not per consignment
• Column 11 in ICAO TI (J in IATA DGR) indicates the
maximum net quantity of dangerous goods per package
permitted on a passenger aircraft
• If amount exceeds quantity in column 11 (J) it can only be
loaded on a cargo aircraft
• Column 13 in ICAO TI (L in IATA DGR) lists the
maximum quantity allowed for cargo aircraft shipments
• For example: Ethanol in packing group II allowed on a
passenger aircraft is 5 L and 60 L per package on a cargo
aircraft
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
353
364
Y341
954
354
954
365
Y342
620
620
959
959
361
352
Y341
355
Y343
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
364
366
Packing Instructions
• ICAO/IATA both use the same format which
is found in the yellow pages in the ICAO TI
and the IATA DGR
• Column 10 and 12 indicate packing
instructions.
• For example: 5 L of Ethanol needs to be
packed according to Packing Instruction 352
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
353
364
Y341
954
354
954
365
Y342
620
620
959
959
361
352
Y341
355
Y343
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
364
366
• PACKING - The art and operation by which articles or substances are
enveloped in wrappings and/or enclosed in packaging or otherwise
secured
• PACKAGING - Receptacles and any other components or materials
necessary for the receptacle to perform its containment function and to
ensure compliance with the minimum packing requirements of these
Instructions (Regulations)
• PACKAGE - The complete product of the packing operation
consisting of the packaging and contents prepared for transport
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
UN Specified Packaging
• Packaging for dangerous goods needs to be
strong, durable and able to withstand a
reasonable amount of damage without
leakage
• Package tests are required for dangerous
goods packaging
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
• "u" over "n" inside a circle
• 4G - Type and shape of packaging
– 4 – Box, 5 – Bag, G – Fibreboard, H – Plastic
• Y - Packing groups
– X - Packing groups I, II and III; Y - Packing groups II and
III; Z - Packing groups III
• 145 - Maximum gross mass
• S - Solid dangerous goods or inner packagings
• 09-Year of manufacture
• US - United States
• PACK1-765 – Manufacturer
• The example is a fibreboard box, Gross maximum of 145
kilograms, Packing groups II or III, Solid dangerous goods or
inner packagings, PACK1, United States, 2009
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
• NOTE: The UN specification mark for Category A
Infectious substances is slightly different than other
UN specification marks.
• Packing groups do not apply to infectious substances
and the package design tests are different than other
dangerous goods. Therefore the UN specification
mark contains the words Class 6.2, referencing that
the package meets the requirements for infectious
substance packaging.
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Exceptions for Small
Quantities
• Small amount of certain dangerous
goods can be shipped as exceptions
to the regulations
• Excepted Quantity
– Small quantity exceptions allows shipments of some
biological specimens in ethanol or formalin
• NOTE: There are no small quantity exceptions for
infectious substances.
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Limited Quantity
• Many dangerous goods can be safely carried with relaxed standards for
packaging when in small or "limited" amounts
• These are referred to as "Limited Quantities" or "LTD QTY". Some
dangerous goods can be carried as limited quantities only under the
following conditions:
– They are identified as such on the List of Dangerous Goods
– The completed package is under the volume or mass limit listed for LTD QTY
– They comply with all the appropriate limited quantity packing, marking and
labeling requirements
• For example: Limited quantity of ethanol - up to 1 L, Packing
Instruction Y305
• NOTE: There are no limited quantity provisions for: Infectious
Substances or Dry Ice
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Triple Packaging
• A leak-proof primary receptacle (such as a
sealed cryovial, test tube, etc.)
• A leak-proof secondary receptacle
• Sufficient absorbent to be placed inside the
secondary (if the sample is solid no absorbent
is necessary)
• Rigid outer packaging of adequate strength for
its capacity, weight and intended use
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
PI 620Category A Infectious Substances
• Packages must be in good condition and present no hazard
• The infectious substance must be packed in triple packaging
• Multiple fragile primary receptacle(s) must be wrapped individually
• Itemized list of contents placed between the secondary and rigid outer
packaging
• Primary or secondary can withstand an internal pressure of 95 kPa and
a temperature range of -40°C to 55°C (-40°F to 130°F)
• At least 100 mm (4 inches) in smallest external dimension
• IATA adds that the name and telephone number of a person
responsible be marked on the outside of the package
• Must have UN specification mark
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
PI 650Category B Infectious Substances
•
•
•
•
•
Good quality packaging
Sample must be packed in triple packaging
Itemized list of contents between the secondary and outer packaging
Multiple fragile primary receptacle(s) must be wrapped individually
Primary or secondary containers can withstand an internal pressure of
95 kPa and a temperature range of -40°C to 55°C (-40°F to 130°F)
• Primary receptacle(s) cannot exceed 1 L and entire package is limited
to 4 L or 4 kg for solid substances.
• At least 100 mm (4 inches) in two dimensions
• Outer packaging or air waybill marked with the name and telephone
number of a person responsible
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Packaging for Exempt
Patient Specimens
• The package must consist of three components:
– A leakproof primary receptacle
– A leakproof secondary receptacle
– An outer packaging of adequate strength for its capacity, mass and
intended use and at least one surface having minimum dimensions of
100 x 100 mm
For liquid patient specimens, absorbent material in sufficient
quantities to absorb the entire contents. The absorbent material
must be placed between the primary and secondary packaging.
Multiple fragile primaries must be wrapped individually
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Other Dangerous Goods
• Other dangerous goods must not be sent with infectious
substances
• Exception - if the dangerous good is necessary to maintain
the viability, stabilizing or preventing degradation or
neutralizing the hazards of the infectious substance
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
PI 959 –
Genetically Modified Organisms
•
Packing Instruction 959 - Packed according to Packing Instruction 620
without testing or UN specification mark
• Packages must be in good condition and present no hazard
• The package must consist of three components:
– Leak-proof primary receptacle(s) (such as a sealed cryovial, test tube, etc.)
– Leak-proof secondary packaging
– Rigid outer packaging of adequate strength for its capacity, weight and intended
use
•
There are no package quantity limits for Genetically modified
organisms
• NOTE: IATA requires the name and telephone number of a person
responsible on the outside of the package.
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Refrigerants & Dry Ice
• Place refrigerants outside the secondary receptacle
• Wet ice is not recommended
• Packing Instruction 954 - Secondary receptacle shall be secured within
the outer package to maintain the original position of the inner
packages after the dry ice has dissipated
• NEVER PLACE DRY ICE IN A SEALED CONTAINER
• The packaging must permit the release of carbon dioxide gas
• Allow ventilation for packages containing dry ice
• NOTE: Effective Jan 01, 2011, the ICAO/IATA packing instructions
will be changing for dry ice from 904 to 954.
• NOTE: There are no regulatory differences between Packing
Instructions 904 and 954.
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Liquid Nitrogen
• Liquid Nitrogen Division 2.2 Non-Flammable,
non-toxic gas
• There are two options for using liquid nitrogen as a
refrigerant: Dry shipper and free standing.
• Dry shipper - liquid nitrogen is fully absorbed in porous
material, package design does not allow pressure build-up
and no release of liquid nitrogen regardless of orientation
• Free standing liquid nitrogen must be classified as Division
2.2 Dangerous Good UN 1977 Nitrogen, refrigerated
liquid
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Gel Packs
• Gel packs are not regulated and may be
reused
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Excepted (Small) Quantities
• Column 9 gives excepted quantity code
• The following requirements must be met in the packaging of
excepted quantities:
– Inner packagings - Glass, porcelain, stoneware, earthenware, metal or
plastic
– The intermediate packagings must contain the contents without
leakage, regardless of orientation
– For liquids - Sufficient absorbent material to absorb the entire contents
should leakage occur. The absorbent may also act as cushioning
– The intermediate packaging must be secured in strong, rigid outer
packaging (wood, fibreboard, or equally strong material). The package
must be of sufficient size to contain all necessary marks
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Shipping dangerous goods in
excepted quantities
• Applicable to shipments where each inner receptacle
contains, in general, no more than 30 ml or 30 g, and each
complete package contains, in general, no more than 500
ml or 500 g.
• There are no shipping papers required, the box is a normal
inexpensive one that can pass a drop test and stacking test,
and there is just one label to be applied to the outside of the
box:
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
353
Y341
355
Y344
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
364
366
Limited Quantities
• Used when a shipper needs to ship small quantities
of dangerous goods which are not permitted, or
have exceeded the quantity of, the Excepted
quantity provisions.
• Acceptable for some products of some hazardous
goods 'Classes' and some 'Packing Groups' that
contain very small quantities of dangerous goods.
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Shipping dangerous goods in
limited quantities
• Applicable to shipments where each inner
receptacle contains, in general, no more than 0.5 L
or 0.5 kg, and each complete package contains, in
general, no more than 1 L or 1 kg.
• The Shipper's Declaration for Dangerous Goods is
required. The box may be a normal, inexpensive
one that can pass a drop test and stacking test. The
box must be marked with the Proper Shipping
Name and UN Number. In addition, the box must
bear the Dangerous Goods in Limited Quantities
label (technically a mark but best purchased from a
label printing company):
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Limited Quantities
• Limited Quantities are found on the List of Dangerous Goods.
The Packing Instructions start with the letter Y
• Combination packaging - inner and outer packaging
• Packing instructions - maximum quantity limits per inner
container. List of Dangerous Goods - outer package quantity
limits
• Limited quantity packages do not need to have the UN
specification mark. However they do require a mark indicating
that they have successfully passed the required tests.
• Limited quantity or LTD QTY
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Y342
354
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
365
Packing Design Tests
• Includes all aspects of the package - inner and
outer packagings
• The package manufacturer will have this
information
• There are three main package tests:
– Stacking tests
– Puncture tests
– Drop tests
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Overpacks
• Overpack means an enclosure that is used by a
single shipper to provide refrigeration, protection
or convenience in the handling of a package or to
consolidate two or more packages
• NOTE: Any package placed in a overpack must be
completely compliant with the required
regulations for the substance to be shipped.
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Examples of Overpacks
• Placed in a protective outer packaging, such as a box or
crate
• Placed into an insulated chest and surrounded with gel
packs, dry ice or other refrigerant
• Placed or stacked onto a load board such as a pallet and
secured by strapping, shrink wrapping, stretch wrapping or
other suitable means
• There are no packing or testing requirements for overpacks
• A simple cardboard box could be used as an overpack. If
two packages were taped together, the tape would be
considered an overpack
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Proper Packaging
• Improper packing voids UN specification mark
• If a package is certified with plastic primaries,
glass primaries are not allowed
• Do not substitute one manufacturer's secondary
with another manufacturer's outer packaging
• NOTE: Once again the shipper will be held
responsible for improperly prepared packages or
non-compliant packages.
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Common Packing Errors
• Not properly closing/sealing primary and secondary
containers
• Not providing enough absorbent or no absorbent at all
• Forgetting to include an itemized list of contents
• Not reading/following the packaging manufacturer's
instructions provided with the packaging
• Using the packaging in a way that has not been tested or
certified (Mixing components from different manufacturers
results in a non-tested and non-certified packing design.)
• Exceeding the quantity limits for the package
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Reuse of Packages
• ICAO/IATA "Before an empty package which
had previously contained an infectious substance
is returned to the shipper, or sent elsewhere, it
must be thoroughly disinfected or sterilized and
any label or marking indicating that it had
contained an infectious substance must be
removed or obliterated."
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Review
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Quantity limits from the List of Dangerous Goods
Packing instructions
UN specified packaging
Small quantities of dangerous goods
Triple packaging
Packing Instruction 620 Category A Infectious substances
Packing Instruction 650 Category B Infectious substances
Exempt patient specimens
Packing Instruction 959 Genetically modified organisms
Refrigerants
Packing Instruction 954 Dry ice
Liquid nitrogen
Small quantities of dangerous goods
Overpacks
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Chapter 6
Marking and Labeling
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Topics to Discuss
• Correct marking and labeling information
including:
– Hazard labels
– Handling labels
• Overpacks
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Marks and Labels
• Markings and labels must be durable and visible
• Each package must display the following information on the outer
packaging:
–
–
–
–
Complete address of the shipper and consignee
The name and telephone number of a person responsible
Appropriate hazard label(s) for each dangerous good
Proper shipping name for each dangerous good
• NOTE: The technical name for a Category A shipment need not be shown on the
package (See special provision A140).
– UN identification number for each dangerous good adjacent to the proper shipping name
– Quantity of the dangerous goods ( required for GMOs and dry ice)
– NOTE: Required for Category A shipments and LTD QTY.
• Labels are to be placed adjacent to the proper shipping name & UN
number
• All marks and labels on one side of packages (size permitting)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Hazard and Handling Labels
• Hazard labels are squares set at an angle of 45
degrees or diamond-on-point
• The dangerous goods class number must be placed
at the bottom of the diamond. The division
number is not required
• Handling Labels: Direct handling procedures For example: Orientation arrows
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Category A Infectious Substances
• Label name: Infectious substance - Minimum
dimensions: 100 × 100 mm (for small packages:
50 × 50 mm) - Number of labels per package: One
- Color: Black and white
• The label should also contain the following text:
– INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCE In case of damage or
leakage immediately notify a Public Health Authority
in U.S.A notify director-CDC, Atlanta GA 1-800-2320124
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Category B Infectious Substances
Marking
• Category B substances require a mark rather than a hazard
label
• Minimum dimensions: 50 × 50 mm - Line thickness at
least 2 mm
• UN3373 must be at least 6 mm in height - Number of
marks per package: One - Color: Any contrasting color
• NOTE: The mark fulfills the requirement for the UN
number so the package only requires the proper shipping
name Biological substances, Category B.
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
• Exempt patient specimens
– Marking of Exempt patient specimen packages as "Exempt
human specimen" or "Exempt animal specimen“
• Hazard label for Class 9 Miscellaneous dangerous
goods
– Label Name: Miscellaneous hazard label - Minimum
dimensions: 100 × 100 mm (for small packages: 50 × 50 mm)
- Number of labels per package: One - Color: Black on white
• Hazard label for free liquid nitrogen
– Label name: Non-flammable, non-toxic gas - Minimum
dimensions: 100 x 100 mm - Number of labels per package:
One - Color: Green with black or white gas cylinder
– NOTE: Required for both open and closed receptacles.
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Package Orientation
• Label name: Orientation label - Minimum dimensions:
Standard A7: 74 × 105 mm - Number per package: Two on
opposite sides - Color: Black and white or red and white
(on a contrasting background)
• NOTE: For infectious substances the orientation arrows
are only required when the primary receptacle exceeds 50
mL. If primary containers exceed 50 mL then the closures
of the primaries must be oriented with the orientation
arrows.
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Cargo Aircraft Only Label
• Label name: Cargo Aircraft Only Minimum dimensions: 120 x 110 mm
(for small packages of infectious
substances dimensions may be halved) Color: Black on orange
• NOTE: Until Jan 01, 2009 the CAO
label contained the words "Do not load
in passenger aircraft". Both labels will be
accepted until Jan 01, 2013 at which
time only the label with the words
"Forbidden on passenger aircraft" will be
accepted.
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Handling Labels for Free Liquid
Nitrogen
• "KEEP UPRIGHT" must be
placed in 120° intervals or on
all sides
• Mark clearly "DO NOT DROPHANDLE WITH CARE"
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Keys to Marking and Labeling
• Try to keep all required marks and labels on one face of the
package
• Hazard labels should be placed in the diamond-on-point
orientation
• Proper shipping name, UN number and net weight (or
quantity) must be marked adjacent to corresponding hazard
label
• Be sure to obliterate, remove, or completely cover any
irrelevant marks or labels
• Do not write on or cover any portion of the hazard label within
the diamond portion of the label
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Marking and Labeling
for Excepted Quantities
• This label is an "E" inside a circle. The
circle is inside a box of red hatchings. The
"E" and circle are also in red
• Under the "E" the class or division of
dangerous good is placed to indicate a
basic risk
• If the shipper's name and address are not
on the package, they are included on the
mark under the class or division
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Marking and Labeling for
Limited Quantities
•
•
•
•
Shipper and consignee address
Limited quantity mark
All pertinent hazard labels
UN number
– UN XXXX adjacent to the hazard label
– UN number in a diamond-on-point orientation - Line
width: Minimum: 2 mm - Letter size: Minimum 6 mm
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Marking and Labeling of Overpacks
• Each package in an overpack must be packed, marked, labeled and
addressed individually
• NOTE: Each package must be fully compliant with the regulations before it
can be placed in an overpack.
• If the marks and labels on the inner packages are not visible they must be
reproduced on the exterior of the overpack
• The quantity marked on the overpack is the sum of the packages inside of
the overpack for identical dangerous goods
• When labels are reproduced the word "Overpack" must be included
• For example, if clear shrink-wrap is used to consolidate several packages
and the marks and labels are visible through the shrink-wrap then further
marking and labeling of the overpack shrink-wrap is not necessary
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
You are shipping 60 mL culture of
Hepatitis B virus. What marks and
labels are required?
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Infectious substance affecting humans
UN 2814
Cargo aircraft only
60 mL
Person responsible
Class 6 label
UN specification
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
You are shipping a 20 mL blood sample
obtained directly from a patient who has
tested positive for HIV. What marks and
labels are required on the package?
• UN 3373 Label
• Person responsible ( if not on waybill)
• Biological substance, Category B
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
You are shipping a 3L sample of human blood
to test for glucose levels. It has been
determined that the sample does not contain
any pathogens. What marks and labels are
required on the package?
• Exempt human specimen
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
You are shipping a 3L sample of human blood
to determine if it contains Herpes B virus.
The sample is being sent with 7 kg of dry ice
to keep the sample frozen. What marks and
labels are required on the package?
•
•
•
•
•
•
UN 3373 Label
Person responsible ( if not on waybill)
Biological substance, Category B
UN 1845
Dry Ice 7kg
Class 9 label
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
You are shipping a tissue sample from a dog
to test for cancer. The sample is not
infectious but it is being sent in 60mL of
formalin. What marks and labels are required
on the package?
•
•
•
•
•
•
Exempt animal specimen
UN 1198
Formaldehyde solution, flammable 60 mL
Class 3 label
Corrosive label
LTD QTY Label
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Review
• Hazard labels
• Handling labels
• Overpacks
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Chapter 7
Documentation
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Topics to Discuss
•
•
•
•
General Information
Shipping Document
Waybills
Examples
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Shipping Documentation
• Dangerous goods shipments require
documentation unless otherwise specified
• Shipper must prepare three copies: 1 - Consignor,
2 - Operator, 3 – Consignee
• NOTE: Some carriers may require more than three
copies.
• Both the carrier and the shipper must maintain
these records for two years
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Shipper’s Declaration
not needed for:
•
•
•
•
•
UN 3373 Biological substance, Category B
Exempt human specimens
Exempt animal specimens
UN 1845 Dry ice
NOTE: When dry ice is used as a refrigerant for dangerous
goods which require a Shipper's Declaration, the shipper
must include dry ice in the declaration.
• Excepted Quantities
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Preparing the Shipper's
Declaration
• Complete all the information on the form
• Ensure that the information on the form is accurate, easy
to identify, legible and durable
• Ensure that the information on the form exactly matches the
information on the package
– Including addresses, weight, proper shipping name, etc.
• Only trained and certified persons may sign the form
• The person who signs the form does not need to be the same as the person
listed in the shipper's address box
• Mistakes may be amended by drawing a single line through the incorrect
text, making the change and then signing (full signature, not initials) next to
the change. Do not use correction fluid
• The diagonal hatchings printed vertically in the left and right margins must
be printed in red ink
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Shipper’s Declaration
• If the Shipper’s Declaration is not 100% correct, it is wrong
and operators will not accept your shipment.
• Enter the name and address of the shipper. A phone number
is not required, but recommended.
• Enter the full name and deliverable address of the consignee.
A PO Box is not acceptable.
• Enter the waybill number if it is known. This box may be left
blank as the operator may enter or amend as needed.
• The pages section is the number of pages needed to record or
list all of the dangerous goods in the consignment, not the
number of copies.
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Shipper’s Declaration
• Aircraft Limitation-If the package exceeds
passenger aircraft limitations, the “Passenger and
Cargo Aircraft” section must be crossed out.
• Airport of Departure- Full name of airport of
departure (if known)
• Airport of Destination- Full name of airport of
destination (if known)
• Shipment Type- cross out “Radioactive”.
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Nature and Quantity of Goods
• The info should be transferred from the List of Dangerous
Goods
• Enter the four digit UN ID Number for each dangerous
good in the consignment.
• Enter the Proper Shipping Name,. A technical name in
parenthesis is required by most authorities.
• Enter the class and division.
• Enter the Packing Group if it is applicable if, not
applicable, leave it blank.
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Nature and Quantity of Goods
• Enter the total quantity of the consignment. For a single
package, it will be the net weight or volume of the
infectious substance and must match the quantity
previously marked on the package.
• Type of package refers to the material of the outer
packaging. Most infectious substance packages will be
fibreboard.
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
• Enter the Packaging Instruction used.
• If you have used a special provision, then the number
must be indicated in the authorization section
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
• In the additional handling information, enter the name and
number of the person responsible for the shipment.
• The 24 hour number must be monitored at all times while
the dangerous good is in transportation by a person who is:
– Knowledgeable of the hazards and characteristics of the dangerous
goods being transported.
– Has comprehensive emergency response and accident information
for the dangerous good or who has immediate access to a person
who possesses such knowledge and info.
– The words “Emergency Contact or 24 hour Number” must be
written. A name is not required.
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
• Enter the name and title of the person
signing the shipper’s declaration
• Enter the city and date
• This person is certifying that all regulations
have been met.
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
20mL culture of Hepatitis B virus
in a fibreboard box?
•
•
•
•
•
•
UN 2814
Infectious substance affecting humans
(Hepatitis B virus)
6.2
I fibreboard box x 20mL
620
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
5 L shipment of non-pathogenic
Genetically modified organism
packed in a fibreboard box?
• UN 3245
• Genetically Modified organism
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Waybills
• This document can be completed by the shipper or the
operator
• If the waybill contains information on both dangerous
goods and non-dangerous goods, the dangerous goods
must be listed first (ICAO 5;4.2/ IATA 8.2)
• Waybills for dangerous goods shipments must include, in
the Handling Information Box, the statements:
– "Dangerous Goods per attached Shipper's Declaration" or
– "Dangerous Goods per attached DGD" (Dangerous Goods
Document)
– "Cargo Aircraft Only" or "CAO" (as applicable)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
• If a shipment does not require a Shipper's Declaration, then
the nature and quantity of goods section on the waybill
must contain:
• UN number
• Proper shipping name
• Class or division number
• Number of packages
• Net quantity per package
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Review
•
•
•
•
•
General Information
Shipper’s Declaration for Dangerous Goods
Waybills
Need for accurate, neat, legible entries
Shipper’s checklist
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Chapter 8
Emergency Response and Security
Training
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Topics to Discuss
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Emergency Response Guidebook
Reporting of spills or emissions
Response to fire
Incident reporting
General security awareness
Security training
Security plans
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Emergency Response
Information
• More information is now needed along with the 24 Hour
Emergency Response telephone number. Now, you must
include the contractor name and customer number.
• Again, besides a 24 Hour Emergency Response number,
DOT requires you to provide additional emergency
response information in a manner that is available for use
when away from the package containing the hazardous
material.
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Emergency Response
Information
• To comply with this requirement, either provide the MSDS for the
material along with your shipping paper (DDG) or provide the
proper emergency response guide book pages for your material
based upon its UN number. In either case, whether you use the
MSDS or the ERG pages, the following information must be
present:
– The basic description and technical name of the hazardous material,
Immediate hazards to health , Risks of fire or explosion, Immediate
precautions to be taken in the event of an accident or incident , Immediate
methods for handling fires, Initial methods for handling spills or leaks in the
absence of fire, Preliminary first aid measures
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
• If you use the ERG guide book pages to
meet the above requirements then you need
to indicate the "basic description and
technical name of the hazardous material"
(its proper shipping name and UN number)
on the guide book pages.
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Emergency Response
Guidebook
• Transport Canada, U.S. DOT, the Secretary of Transport
and Communications of Mexico with collaboration from
the Centro de Información Química para Emergencias of
Argentina have developed an Emergency Response
Guidebook
• This book is used by fire fighters, ambulance, police and
other emergency services personnel who may be the first
to respond to a dangerous goods accident and incident
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Emergency Response Procedures
• Avoid handling the package
• Handle only while wearing protective clothing
• Inspect adjacent packages for contamination and set them
aside
• Inform the appropriate public health or veterinary authority
• Provide information on any other countries of transit
• Inform the local authorities, the consignor, consignee and
the person responsible
• Contact the appropriate national authority
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Spills, Leaks or Fires
• Do not touch or walk through the spilled material.
• Do not touch damaged containers or spilled materials
• Absorb the spill with earth, sand or other non-combustible
material
• Cover the damaged package or spilled material with a
damp towel or rag
• Keep it wet with liquid bleach or other disinfectant
• Small fire - Use a dry chemical, soda ash, lime or sand
• Larger fire - Use an extinguishing agent suitable for the
type of surrounding fire
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
First Aid
•
•
•
•
If possible, move the victim to a safe, isolated area
Call emergency medical care if required
Remove contaminated clothing and shoes
Immediately flush the victim's skin or eyes with running
water for at least 20 minutes
• Effects of exposure to the substance, be it inhalation,
ingestion or skin contact, may be delayed
• The victim may be a source of contamination
• Ensure that any medical personnel are made aware of the
material involved so they can take precautions
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Incident Reporting
• ICAO 7;4.4 An operator must report dangerous goods
accidents and incidents to the appropriate authorities of the
state of the operator and the state in which the accident or
incident occurred in accordance with the reporting
requirements of those appropriate authorities. (IATA 9.6.1)
• The DOT requirements for incident reporting are found in
49 CFR 171.15 and 171.15
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Security Awareness
• Dangerous goods have and can cause major incidents with loss
of life, property and environmental damage
• Intentional misuse of dangerous goods
• Strict security measures are recommended
• ICAO 1;5.1.1 International regulations dictate that any
individual who handles dangerous goods should consider
security requirements for dangerous goods according to their
responsibilities (IATA 1.6.1.1)
• The DOT requires that each hazmat employee must receive
training that provides an awareness of security risks associated
with hazardous materials transportation and methods designed
to enhance transportation security [49 CFR 172.704 (4)]
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Security Awareness Training
•
•
•
•
ICAO 1; 5.2 The nature of security risks
Recognition of security risks
Methods to address and reduce such risks
Actions to be taken in the event of a security breach (IATA
1.6.2)
• Including security plans (if appropriate)
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Security Plans
• Category A Infectious substances are High Consequence
Dangerous Goods
• This means they have a high potential for misuse in a
terrorist incident and which may result in or produce
serious consequences such as mass casualties or mass
destruction (ICAO 1; 5.3.1 IATA 1.6.3.3)
• Any shipper or operator who handles and/or transports
high consequence dangerous goods should adopt a security
plan to guard against potential incidents
Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Take Quiz
To complete your training, please click on the “take quiz” box above or
use this direct test link:
https://audubon.tulane.edu/ehs/enterssn.cfm?testnum=109
Tulane University
Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)
Please contact Kellie C. Mayer
(504) 419-1391
[email protected]
for questions and/or interactive discussion.

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