Winter Driving Techniques, cont.

Report
Winter Driving Safety Tips
Offered by the Franklin & Marshall Department of Public Safety
© Copyright 2014, Franklin & Marshall Department of Public Safety
1
Introduction
The Department of Public Safety wants you to have a safe winter
season.
This presentation is intended to help you avoid problems that can
occur during winter driving.
While we can’t ensure you will be trouble free, the safety tips
offered may help you avoid typical travel delays during inclement
winter weather.
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WINTER WEATHER PREPERATIONS
• Wipers - Good working order
• Ice Scraper - A necessity
• Windshield Washer Fluid - Fill Up
• Anti-freeze - 50% water 50% Coolant
• Battery & Belts - Check condition
• Oil - Replace your oil with Winter grade oil
• Tires - Check treads, pressure and owners manual recommendations (Seasonal)
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BEFORE TRIPS:
PACK A WINTER CAR KIT
• Snow brush w/ scraper
• Flashlight w/ batteries
• Blanket
• Mittens, socks & hat
• Small shovel
• Sack of sand or kitty litter
• Jumper cables
• Hazard sign, flares or flag
• Windshield washer fluid
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BEFORE TRIPS: CHECK
• Battery
• Antifreeze
• Wipers & fluid
• Ignition system
• Thermostat
• Lights
• Hazard lights
• Exhaust system
• Heater
• Brakes
• Defroster
• Oil level
5
RISK
• Is my car equipped for the weather?
• Can I make this trip later?
• What would be the safest route?
• Am I prepared for emergencies?
I’m not stubborn. I’m just very determined.
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Warm Up & Clean Off
• Idle the engine – do not race it.
• Clean off the vehicle completely.
• Clean all light lenses.
• Scrape all windows and mirrors clear.
• Good all-round visibility is important.
Remember – being in a hurry now may result in an accident
down the road.
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Carbon Monoxide
• Each year 1,500 people are killed in the U.S. by
carbon monoxide.
• More than 10,000 are exposed to levels so
dangerous that medical attention is required.
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Carbon Monoxide, cont.
• Carbon Monoxide is Odorless & Colorless
• First signs include Nausea, Headache, Dizziness
• It Causes Drowsiness
• Automatic starters can cause a build-up before
you get into the car.
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Carbon Monoxide Prevention
• Never run the vehicle in a closed area, i.e., your garage.
• Have your exhaust system checked for leaks.
10
Know Your Vehicle
For safe winter driving, know how your car should react in snow.
• Rear wheel drives push you.
• Front wheel drives pull you along.
The systems may feel a little different, but always steer in the
direction of a skid, and make gentle corrections to regain control.
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Know Your Brake System
To make a stop on a slippery road surface:
• Regular brakes – pump the brake pedal.
• Anti-lock brakes (ABS) – press down and hold. The brakes will do the
pumping
12
If you skid
Skidding can occur for a variety of reasons:
• Black ice
• Driving too fast for conditions
• Sudden acceleration
• Sudden steering corrections
• Braking
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If you skid, cont.
If your vehicle begins to skid, take the follow actions:
Front end skid – release the brake and let the front wheels roll freely
to regain traction and steering control.
Rear end skid – take your foot off the accelerator and turn in the
direction that the rear of the vehicle is skidding, pump the brakes
slightly.
14
Black Ice
Black ice is especially dangerous because you can’t see it.
• Areas where you commonly encounter it include:
• Bridges
• Overpasses
• Underpasses
• Shaded areas
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Black Ice, cont.
If you encounter black ice:
• Don’t panic.
• Make no sudden changes in direction or speed.
• Ease off the accelerator.
• Gradually steer in the direction that the rear of the vehicle is
skidding.
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Hydroplaning
At speeds as low as 30 mph, tires start to ride up on a film of water
like water skis. This is called hydroplaning.
• At 55 mph, tires may be totally riding on the top of the water film.
• In a rain storm your tires may lose all contact with the road at 55
mph.
• If this is the case, there is no friction to brake, speed up or turn.
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Hydroplaning, cont.
A gust of wind, a change in road level, or a slight turn can create a
skid.
• To avoid hydroplaning, you must slow down in heavy rain, standing
water or slush on the road.
• Do not drive or bald or badly worn tires.
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Fog
When you encounter fog, use your low beam headlights.
• If possible, stop, get off the road and wait until conditions improve.
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More Winter Driving Techniques
• Driving at reduced speeds enables you to stop quicker.
• Activate turn signals sooner than usual. This give other drivers more
time to react.
• Touch your brake pedal to warn other drivers of your intention to
slow or stop.
• Maintain at least triple the normal distance from the vehicle in front
of you.
• Keep your gas tank at least half full.
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More Winter Driving Techniques, cont.
• Allow more time for travel.
• Drive with your lights on.
• Look well ahead of you.
• Anticipate problems.
Always wear your seat belts!
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If you get stuck in snow- - • Clear a path.
• Straighten the front wheels.
• Use abrasive material under the wheels (sand, cat litter).
• Gently press the accelerator.
• Don’t spin the wheels.
• As a last resort, rock the vehicle from forward to reverse (check the
owners manual).
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Summary
At the Department of Public Safety, our goal is to keep all students,
staff and guests safe under any conditions. We hope this presentation
will help you stay safe during winter driving.
William J. McHale,
Director/Chief of Police,
An accredited law enforcement agency
Version 1.0 120714
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