Secondary - Caritas Australia

Report
Introduction to Caritas Australia
Who we are
A snapshot
Caritas Australia is the Catholic
agency for international aid and
development.
Caritas Australia helps people to
help themselves, regardless of
race, political beliefs, gender or
religion.
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Who we are
A snapshot
Our work is guided by the Catholic
Social Teaching moral framework,
with an emphasis on upholding
the Dignity of the human person.
Our core focus is the poorest of
the poor - the most vulnerable
and marginalised.
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Five Fast Facts:
LORENZ WORTHMANN BEGAN CARITAS IN 1897, GERMANY.
FOUNDED IN AUSTRALIA IN 1964 AS THE CATHOLIC OVERSEAS RELIEF COMMITTEE.
IN 1996, THE NAME CHANGED TO CARITAS, WHICH MEANS LOVE AND COMPASSION
IN LATIN.
THE INITIAL FOCUS WAS TO RESPOND TO DISASTERS WITH FUNDING. THE EMPHASIS
IS NOW ON LONG-TERM DEVELOPMENT AND SELF-SUSTAINABILITY IN VULNERABLE
COMMUNITIES.
CARITAS AUSTRALIA HELPS THE POOREST OF THE POOR IN OVER 30 COUNTRIES
AROUND THE WORLD AND IS PART OF AN INTERNATIONAL NETWORK COMPRISING
OVER 200 COUNTRIES AND TERRITORIES.
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Our global network
Caritas Australia is the Catholic Agency for
International Aid and Development in Australia.
The organisation is part of Caritas Internationalis,
an international confederation of 165 Catholic relief,
development and social service organisations working to build
a better world for the poorest of the poor
in over 200 countries and territories.
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One Human Family, Zero Poverty Film- Caritas Internationalis
Our Organisational Structure
Our Organisational Structure
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What we do
Our work can be summarised as:
Humanitarian aid
Long term development
Advocacy and education
Staff from CRS visit Cagayan de Oro after Typhoon Bopha,
Phillipines.
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A woman from the Xishuangbanna
minority ethnic group weaving. China
Credit: St. Jospeh’s Nundah
Credit: Caritas Australia
Credit: CRS
within Australia and with our International Partners.
A parish school ‘Walking for justice’
as a PC fundraiser.
Humanitarian Aid
Credit: ACT/Caritas
Credit: REUTERS/ Yuriko Nakao Courtesy of AlertNet.org
Responding to Disaster
SUDAN
ACEH, INDONESIA
Caritas works through local partners to provide emergency food
supplies, clothing, housing and medical attention.
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Long Term Development
Credit: Sean Sprague
Helping people help themselves
Farid and Alpona milk their cow and sell cow milk for
additional income. Bangladesh
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Caritas supports
communities through
development programs
focusing on various global
issues, such as:
• health and hygiene
• education
• food security and
agriculture
• water and sanitation
Education and Advocacy
Encouraging Social Change
Credit: Caritas Australia
Caritas supports
people to challenge
the structures that
keep them poor.
Fernandez Peira de Silva, lives in a favela in Sao Paulo, Brazil. He works with
Movimiento de Defensa do favelados , which works with participants in
advocacy, and working to develop individual gifts for the community.
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Education and Advocacy
Changing Attitudes in Australia
Credit: Caritas Australia
Caritas Australia
educates Australians by
promoting a just and
compassionate society
and encouraging
everyone to become a
‘leader for justice’.
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Our advocacy program
provides ways for
Australians to stand up
against injustice.
Education and Advocacy
Changing Attitudes in Australia
We provide extensive education
resources for adults and the
school audience on global issues,
linked to the Australian
Curriculum.
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Primary and Secondary resource brochures
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Where we work
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How we work
• Through local partners
• Integrated Human Development
• Increasing capacity for self-help
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Why we do it
Catholic Identity
"Jesus stood up to read, and the scroll of the prophet Isaiah was
given to him. He unrolled the scroll and found the place where it
was written:
‘The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to
bring good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim release
to the captives and recovery of sight to the blind, to let the
oppressed go free, to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favour.’
Then he began to say to them, ‘Today this scripture has been
fulfilled in your hearing.’“
(Luke 4: 16-19, 21)
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CST principles unpacked
Why we do it
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Human Dignity
The Common Good
Solidarity
Subsidiarity
Participation
Preferential Option for the Poor
Stewardship of Creation
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Credit: Erin Johnson
Catholic Social Teaching Principles
Credit: Laura Sheahen/Caritas ACT 2013
Human
Dignity
A mother holds her baby, who has just received the polio vaccine and other immunizations. At
the clinic in Hamedia camp near Zalingei, Darfur,
All people are created in the image of God.
People do not lose dignity because of disability,
poverty, age, lack of success, or race.
This emphasises people over things,
being over having.
CST principles unpacked
Common
Good
The rights of individuals must be balanced
with the wider common good of all.
CST principles unpacked
Solidarity
• We are one ‘body’. When one suffers, we all suffer.
• We are called to stand with those who struggle.
• We are called to stand with those who work for
justice.
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CST principles unpacked
Credit: Peter Saunders
Subsidiarity
Village women meet for Australia-supported Harith Ashia ('Green Hope') integrated
natural resource management program. India
• People have the right to make their own decisions
about what affects them.
• A higher level community should not interfere in the
life of a community – it should support and enable.
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CST principles unpacked
Credit: caritas Switzerland
Participation
In Chawir, there are two large communal gardens. Around 200 women work here
everyday. Chad.
• Everyone has a right to participate in society.
• Everyone has a right to participate in what is
necessary for human fulfilment.
e.g. work, education, political participation.
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CST principles unpacked
Stewardship
of Creation
• The goods of the earth are gifts.
• We hold them in trust and must look after them.
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CST principles unpacked
Credit: Catholic Relief Services
Preferential
Option
for the
Poor
Makeshift shelters made with sticks, blankets and plastic sheeting are the only means of shade
or warmth for many of the Malian refugees who have fled the West African food crisis situation
in Niger.
• Seeing the world through the eyes of the poor.
• Looking at public policy decisions in terms of
how they affect the poor.
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Community
•
We support communities
rather than individuals
Needs are identified by locals
Credit: Caritas Australia
•
o Cooperative effort
o Helping people help
themselves
This leader is in Nkhungulu village, Malawi, he is role-playing for the community
how to learn development techniques from neighbours, and how they can continue
to support and learn from each other.
Partnership
•
Partner and fund local
NGOs (e.g.
Caritas Chokwe, Mozambique)
Through the whole development
process:
-
Technical support
-
Management and planning advice
-
Mentoring
-
Guidance
Credit: Caritas Australia
•
This community outside of Lilongwe city, Malawi had relied on a dirty nearby water
spring for water. Through this program the community have now built a borewater
source close to their village.
Participation
Capacity building by involving
stakeholders in the local
community:
o Consultation;
Sean Sprague
•
o Planning;
o Implementation;
o Evaluation of the program.
The Caritas Australia-supported CONTRASIDA program advocates to the national
government on behalf of those affected by HIV/AIDS, promoting fair access to
government health programs, medical services, employment, education, and full civic
participation. El Salvador.
Participation
Social change through:
• Capacity building
Credit: Caritas Australia
• Advocacy programs
• Collaboration with other
actors, e.g. government
Peter Maduki of Caritas Tanzania shows Caritas staff the village of Endashang’wet,
Tanzania and their community’s vision for five years’ time.
and social institutions
Stewardship
• Sustainable development
• Sustainable farming
• Minimising environmental
Credit: Caritas Australia
damage
• Good stewardship of
resources
A farmer who has received help with sustainable agriculture techniques.
Afghanistan.
Poorest of the Poor
• People are the subject of
their own development
• Programs are tested
Credit: Catholic Relief Services
• Locating poorest and
most marginalised may
require more time and
resources
A Malian refugee receiving her hygiene kit in Kizamou, Abala district, Niger. The
Caritas network is distributing hygiene kits to thousands of families affected by the
West African 2012 crisis.
Millennium Development Goals
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Caritas Australia and AusAid partnership: working
towards the achievement of the MDGs.
http://www.blueprintforabetterworld.org/
Community Engagement Tools and Programs
Walk as one
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A Just climate
Act for justice in the DRC
Publish what you pay
What can I do - Activity
Deepening our responses
Justice Perspective
Charitable Act
Solidarity Act
Donate to Project
Compassion
Caritas K’s
Awareness Raising Act
Hold an event/assembly
Action for Change
Write to your MP/Sign a
petition
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What can I do from Australia?
Prayer &
Reflection
In our office
Public speaking
Fundraising
At events
Volunteer
Resources
caritas.org.au
CaritasNews
e-publications
Just Leadership Days
Professional Dev.
Immersions
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Stories of
transformation
as inspiration
to….
Learn
about the
issues
Amplify the
voice of the
poor
Give
financially
Campaigns
A Just Climate
Walk As One
Social Media
Project Compassion
Bequest
Major Gifts
Caritas Ks
Regular Giving
Online
Appeals
What is distinctive about Caritas?
Our Catholic Identity
Credit: Erin Johnson
Part of the extensive
Catholic Church
network
A church in Sao Paulo, Brazil.
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Find out more
www.caritas.org.au
1800 024 413
Last updated August 2013
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