Dairy Production.ppt

Report
Agricultural and Horticultural
Science 3.2
Milking
Aotearoa
Achievement Standard 90650
Investigate production and
marketing of a nationally
significant primary product
Credits: 4
Level : 3
Contents
Section
1.
2.
3.
4.
The NZ Dairy Industry
How is Dairy Production Measured
Making Milk using food.
Management Techniques to improve
production.
Te NZ Dairy Industry
NZ’s biggest export earner
$NZ 10 billion
export earnings
(2008-9)
11,735 dairy
herds and 4.5
million dairy
cows
2% of total world production at
around 17.3 billion litres
1.5 billon kgs of milksolids.
Holstein-Friesian is the prevalent dairy
cow breed in New Zealand making up
43% of total dairy cows
Te NZ Dairy Industry
New Zealand is the
world’s largest butter
exporter and accounts
for about 44% of all
traded butter.
The number of cows in milk has increased by
about 10% over the last 5 years.
NZ exports skim and whole milk
powder. 27% and 38%,
respectively, of world trade.
Measuring Dairy Production
(The first big question)…
• To answer this think about what a dairy farm
produces.
Answer = ___________
• Then, what is this ‘raw’ product is made into
to…
Answer = ___________
Measuring Dairy Production
Next think about what it is in the raw product that is of
value to the marketer (person selling the final product)
Answer = ___________
To help with the above it would be wise to consider what
the raw product contains ie what makes up a litre of raw
milk:
Answer = ___________
composition
Link to raw milk
Raw Milk
•
•
•
•
Raw milk's composition varies slightly among
cow species, type of food and other conditions,
so the figures are only approximations.
Fat 3.9%
Protein 3.4%
Water 87%
Other 5.7 %
• Link to what is in raw milk
Raw mik contains…
What’s in it?
Compare the components of raw milk
to:
Water
Fat
Protein
Other
Cheese contains…
Butter contains…
Milk powder contains…
Water
Fat
Protein
Other
Water
Fat
Protein
Other
Water
Fat
Protein
Other
The value in the raw milk is in the amount or protein and fat.
The value in the raw milk is in the amount or protein and fat.
The key idea!
A dairy farmer is not interested in how many
litres of milk they produce, but rather the
amount of milk solids (MS).
What would happen to a dairy
farmer who decided to add
water to their milk?
Payment is based on A+B-C
Where: A = Milk Fat
B = Milk Protein
C = Litres
Why do milk companies
penalise producers who have a
low milk solid / litre ratio?
If a cow produces 40kg of milk
fat and 60 kg of milk protein
per year. How many kgs of MS
does it produce?
Measuring Milk Production
A major market force of the NZ dairy system is QUALITY
of the raw milk (measured in amount of milk solids)
Other market forces play a role
Quantity the amount of milk solids a farm can produce
Consumer preference for example organic milk
Reliability of supply can the farm put out a regular amount of milk?
Seasonality What happens if there is a drought?
Timing is the producer able to supply all year round
Now we know…
… that a producer gets paid on the amount (kg) of
milk solids (MS). Production is measured in MS.
The KPIs that he uses to see how will he is
producing compared to other farms:
• kgMS/ cow
A hectare (ha) is 100m x 100m or
2. Most dairy farms are 200 –
10,000
m
• KgMS/ ha
500 ha.
And sometimes
• kgMS/ kgDM
A kg of dry matter(DM) is one kg of
dry grass/ hay/ silage/ etc.
In summary
• There are two aspect of marketing we need to
further investigate:
1. How important is it that NZ dairy farmers
produce MS at low cost to compete in the
world trade of dairy products?
2. How important is it that farms produce
consistent volumes throughout the year?
Section two
Making Milk Using Food
We will now explore the process of growing food
and making milk
How to make milk
Cow Food
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Grass
Hay
Dairy NZ – Feed Values
Grass Silage
Feed Values - Exercise
Maize Silage
Bi Products such as PKE or Brewers Grain
Crops (such as Kale)
Concentrates (such as Barley)
Grass is cheap
• The NZ Dairy Industry has a major competitive
advantage in our ability to produce food for
cows cheaply. We call this food – pasture.
Pasture is grass, clover and other paddock
species.
Grass is cheap.
Nelson
42 51 39 28 17 11
8 25 49 73 50 46
Grass Supply
The previous slide shows the feed supply
curve for a dairy farm in Victoria Australia.
• Exercise – Produce a graph showing
the feed supply of a NZ based dairy
farm.
Use the data on the Dairy NZ website :
http://www.dairynz.co.nz/page/pageid/2145861167/Pasture_Growth_Data
Graph template:
Click on map
to show NZs
Major
dairying areas
In summary
• Pasture supply curves and pasture demand
curves show the area feed deficit and feed
surplus.
• Supplements are used to reduce feed deficit.
• Supplements allow a farmer to take excess food
during a surplus and store until required into a
deficit
• Different foods have different amounts of
energy/kgDM. We can compare them using the
MJME/KgDM

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