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Report
CPAC 2014
ADVISING,
SUPERVISING,
MENTORING, OH MY!
WHAT HAT DO YOU
WEAR?
Kim Kushner,
Coordinator
for Student
Development
& Leadership
Kim.Kushner@
colorado.edu
303-492-5675
Lindy Stein,
Residence
Hall Director
Lindy.Stein@
colorado.edu
303-492-7732
University
of Colorado
Boulder
INTRODUCTIONS
Tell us:




Your Name
Your School
Why you are at this session
What you would like to get out of the
session
AGENDA/OUTCOMES
Review terminology for some of our most
important job responsibilities
Articulate and further define difference
between advising and supervising
Reflect on professional role and its
relationship to advising
Share best practices and struggles with
student organization advising
Create action plan/goals to better your role
as an advisor and student affairs practitioner
FRAMEWORKS
 Managing, Supervising, Advising and
Mentoring: Each Requires a Unique
Hat for the Professional by Monica
Marcelis Fochtman
 Advisor Resource Training (ART),
National Association of College and
University Residence Halls (NACURH)
ADVISE, MANAGE, MENTOR, SUPERVISE:
THE BASICS
Advise (v.): offer advice, to counsel;
recommend, suggest; inform, notify
Manage (v.): to direct the affairs or interests of;
direct or conduct business affairs
Manager (n.): One who controls resources &
expenses
Mentor (n.): A wise and trusted counselor or
teacher
Supervise (v.): To have the charge & direction of
Supervisor (n.): One who supervises
DRAW YOUR STUDENT AFFAIRS HAT
ADVISE, MANAGE, MENTOR, SUPERVISE:
THE UNIQUE HATS WE WEAR
Advise: Wearing the Hard Hat
Manage: Wearing the Clown Hat
Mentor: Wearing the Wizard Hat
Supervise: Wearing the Captain’s and First
Mate’s Hat
ADVISOR OVERVIEW
ADVISORS SHOULD:
ADVISORS SHOULD NOT:
Develop a good rapport with the students
Become such an advocate that they lose their
objective point of view
Suggest
Impose
Work with the executive board to complete tasks
Do the work of the President or for other members
of the executive board
Help ensure that the group examines all sides of
an issue
Lose their objectivity or sense of the bigger
picture/purpose
Help develop a sense of team spirit and
cooperation
Allow the organization to become a one or twoperson operation
Be assertive on necessary issues
Be laissez faire or autocratic
Have a relationship with the group that allows
challenge, support, and growth
Be the parent or smothering administrator
Attend all of the group’s meetings and programs
Assume they are to handle everything and will
benefit without your presence
Treat members as individuals and work with those
unique styles and skills
Practice the same style of advising throughout the
year or as the student leadership changes
ROLES OF AN ADVISOR
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
resource person
planner
financial counselor
role model
consultant
sounding board
liaison
developer
ROLES OF AN ADVISOR:
BEGINNING AND EVALUATION
Starting Point:
The advisor and group should
determine jointly the advisor’s role
Let students discuss what they feel
advisor’s role in group should be
The advisor should state a
definition of the role, including
institutional pressures that affect it
ROLES OF AN ADVISOR:
BEGINNING AND EVALUATION
 Evaluate the Role:
 Is the advisor following the agreed-upon role?
 Is there a need to renegotiate the role?
 Is the advisor available to the group?
 Is the advisor appropriately involved at meetings?
 Is the advisor helpful to individual officers and
members?
 Does the advisor offer constructive feedback and
appropriate suggestions?
 Does the advisor share information concerning
institutional policies and procedures with the group?
 Does the advisor assist leaders in learning and using
group development tools?
FINAL THOUGHTS:
BEST PRACTICES/GOAL SETTING
 What works for you as an advisor
and balancer of so many
professional responsibilities/hats?
 Where do you still need to grow?
 Write down 3 SMART goals you
have for this year regarding your
advising role
 SMART: Specific, Measurable,
Achievable, Realistic, Time-Framed
FINAL QUOTE

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