Breaking Down the Barriers

Report
Welcome!
Training Founders
Agenda Highlights
Welcome and Introductions
Independent Living
Systemic Barriers
Know Thyself
Understanding the Barrier
LUNCH
Role Playing
Evaluation & Conclusion
Introductions &
Objectives for the Day
what we hope to achieve
Advocacy in Action Video
a message from
Bill Adair
Executive Director, CPA Ontario
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJ2C5NV8hTo
An individual’s ability to effectively communicate, convey, negotiate
or assert his or her own interests, desires, needs, and rights.
Tips for Self-Advocacy
• Know and understand your rights and responsibilities
• Learn all you can about your disability, needs, strengths and
weaknesses
• Know what accommodations you need as well as why you need
them
• Know how to effectively/assertively communicate your needs
and preferences
• Find out who the key people are and how to contact them if
necessary
• Be willing to ask questions when something is unclear or you
need clarification
A wide range of strategies are available in
addressing systemic barriers.
Choose the approaches YOU want to take from the
tools we introduce today.
A public “media” strategy may work, or media may
not see it as valuable – be careful not to burn
bridges!
Rome wasn't built in a day! With perseverance,
building and preserving relationships with service
providers and others will help achieve mutually
acceptable results.
Independent Living
Systemic Barriers
Know Thyself
Emotions & empowerment
Take some distance – Put your emotions on the “back
burner” and return to them later; get some
perspective.
Relax – Have a coffee or a glass of wine; read the
paper; go to a gallery.
Talk it out – Connect with family and friends; rant if
you need to.
Use humor – Laugh at the situation; release
frustration.
Strategize – Plan a way forward; sound out your plan
with others.
Possible Partners
"Individually,
we are one drop.
Together,
we are an ocean.”
- Ryunosuke Satoro
None of us should have to
address systemic barriers
alone.
When considering what
approach to take,
CPA Ontario staff
Other disability organizations (Citizen
Advocacy, Ottawa Community Support
Coalition, Citizens with Disabilities Ontario,
March of Dimes, MS Society, etc.)
Legal supports
Family members
Friends
Government Partners (we will discuss
meetings with decision makers later today)
Understanding the Barrier
the value of research
When researching a topic, we need to find out what
the CORE ISSUES are, including
the Five Ws:
… and the
of the situation
Once the core issue is established, we need to find
out what
1) What have others done in similar situations?
2) What proof might be offered against the provider
(person or organization) you are dealing with?
How might this proof be contradicted?
3) What does this research show by way of possible
solutions?
With the core issue and possible
solutions identified, what
1) What resources does the provider
have?
2) What opportunities exist for linkages
with other providers?
Considering the partners or
resources available,
1) Where can we find a “win-win”?
2 )If no optimum solution is available,
what is the next best one?
Engaging the Right People
Or, What is Their Perspective?
Whom
about this?
Personal Support Worker, other
service providers
Case manager, Executive Director?
Store manager, Corporate Executive
Officer?
What is the
of service
providers when considering where they
are coming from?
Where are they coming from?
Is it a lack of knowledge?
A lack of resources?
Role Playing – Verbal Language
Role play example:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QFOvbIpE1Ms
When we use the term “You do this” or
“You’re like that” this may be perceived by
the other person as accusatory.
When we use the term “I feel like this is
what happens”, this creates some
distance – and the other person is less
defensive.
SCENARIO 1: Mall
PERSON 1 is using a mobility aid
(walker, wheelchair, etc.) is in the
mall and can’t get into a store.
She asks a store clerk if he/she can
get something, only to be asked,
“Don’t you have a nurse to do this
for you?”
SCENARIO 2: Crowded public transit
bus
PERSON 1 in a wheelchair
overhears PERSON 2 that people
with disabilities should use
designated wheelchair bus, not the
able-bodied public bus.
SCENARIO 3: Crowded public transit
bus
PERSON 1 in a wheelchair motions
to PERSON 2 to give up his seat so
he/she can get on the bus.
PERSON 2 does not comply.
SCENARIO 4: Home
PERSON 1 who has a disability is on
the phone with PERSON 2, the
attendant services case manager.
The attendant has not shown up for
the scheduled shift.
ACT THE SCENE
Part 1: PERSON 1 uses “You do”
language.
ACT THE SCENE
Part 2: PERSON 1 uses “I feel”
language
ACT THE SCENE
The impact of assertive communication:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjFuyZydvhg
Role Playing – Body Language
Role play example:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hCEUDAMuNg0
Body language is conveyed through signals that
we send with our facial expressions, eye contact,
posture and tone of voice.
While less obvious than verbal language, body
language is important. It gives an impression
with respect to how you feel and how open you
are to working with others to resolve systemic
barriers.
With respect to
consider:
Is there enough space between you and the person?
Do you feel comfortable?
If the person is too close, consider moving back.
If possible , are you looking at the person while
speaking to him or her?
If possible, are you speaking audibly and clearly?
SCENARIO : Employer’s office
PERSON 1 with a physical disability
is late for work because of the
accessible transit bus being late that
morning.
PERSON 2 is the employer that does
not understand why this happens.
ACT THE SCENE
Part 1: PERSON 1 uses body language
that is not engaging when explaining
the situation.
ACT THE SCENE
Part 2: PERSON 1 uses body language
that is engaging.
ACT THE SCENE
When interacting with someone in a more
confrontational context, be aware, if you use a
wheelchair, that the person talking to you may
be “towering” above you.
Remind yourself that this does not mean that
the person is “towering” above you in terms of
the points you make.
Consider asking the person to sit down at eye
level with you.
Meeting with Decision
Makers
A decision maker is a person who is
vested with authority and resources to
help bring about change.
Examples of
are:
Supervisors
Planners
Executive Directors
City Councilors
Members of Provincial Parliament
Members of Parliament
There are two main types of meetings that you will have:
1. Brief “elevator” meetings
a. These occur informally and require you to be ready to give a
quick 30 second summary of what you are advocating for
b. These usually take place when you happen to run into someone,
like in an elevator, or on the street
2. Formal meetings
a. These are longer, scheduled meetings where the majority of
your information will be presented. If you’re meeting with an
MP, these are usually a maximum of 10 minutes.
Whether planning for an informal, or a formal
meeting, it is important to plan out what you
want to say.
When developing
, based on the
research, make three core points:
What the issue is
How it affects you personally and others
How you feel the person may help
Listen for
and
“If you can provide more information to
show that…”
“If you can find a partner able to provide X
amounts of service, I can find an
organization that will…”
Writing to your decision maker is sometimes the only
option. Keep in mind:
• State why you are writing, how it affects you/why you
are concerned
• Tell them how you feel, and what you want them to do.
• Tell them you expect to hear back about what they are
going to do about the issue
• Be courteous
• Always include the date, your name and the address at
which you can be contacted.
• ALWAYS keep a copy of the letter
Role Playing – MPP /
Constituent Scenario
SCENARIO 1: MPP’s office
PERSON 1 with a physical disability
wants to have more affordable,
accessible housing options.
He/she is speaking to PERSON 2,
his/her Member of Provincial
Parliament.
ACT THE SCENE
Part 1: PERSON 1 uses positive
VERBAL and BODY LANGUAGE.
He/she PRESENTS THE ISSUES
CLEARLY.
ACT THE SCENE
Part 2: PERSON 1 is DISTRACTED and
VAGUE.
ACT THE SCENE
“We’re Not Done Yet!” –
Where to Go from Here
After meeting with the decision maker,
do the following:
• Did it meet expectations?
• How did the person respond?
What are the next steps?
Another meeting with the decision
maker?
Possibly a follow-up e-mail or letter
thanking them for their time?
A meeting with another partner?
Is there anything else we need to do to
move this issue forward?
Conclusion and Evaluation
Please don’t forget to fill out the
you leave today!
We look forward to
improve this training –
and
to
Please note that a “post-training”
evaluation will be sent to you three
months from now.
In the meantime, many thanks! Check
out the Blooper Reel!
Contact Information
Nathan Hauch
Champlain SCI Solutions Alliance
Coordinator
613.723.1033 Ext. 227
[email protected]

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