Planning an Event

Report
Planning an Event
What is Planning About?
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Planning is always future oriented
Planning focuses on formulating goals
Planning is political in nature
It involves leadership and values
It occurs within an
organizational framework
The Role of Policies
• Policies implement the mission and goals of the
organization
• Policies are a set of rules governing the activities of
the members of an organization or group
• They can be formal (written) or informal (unwritten)
• Policies show what actions are desirable,
permissible, or forbidden.
• Policies should not become so
rigid that they inhibit flexibility
or creativity
Event Project Planning
• Project planning is “the design and
implementation of a plan to create a new
event, on time, and within established
parameters pertaining to resources, venues
and impacts” Donald Getz
• Projects have definite
starting and ending dates
Concept or Conceptual Planning
The Process
Asset Mapping/Feasibility Study
Decision to Proceed or Terminate
Formulation of a Preliminary Plan
The Contract or Approval
Detailed Project Planning
Plan Implementation
The Event
The Event Wrap-Up
Project Termination
Concept or Conceptual Planning
• The process may begin with
– an idea for a new event,
– a perceived need to revise or replace an
existing event
– an RFP (request for proposal) from the
potential sponsor
– Scope Creep
Asset & Liability Mapping
• Map (Identify & Locate) the community assets
– Cultural/Historical/Natural Resources
– Transportation, Dining & Lodging Infrastructure
– Community Support and Volunteer resources
• Map the Liabilities (competing events)
geographically and through time.
Feasibility Study--Purposes
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Determination of ability to get funds or approval
Market tests and demand forecasts
Assessment of affordability and/or profitability
Physical aspects—weather, venues, accessibility,
accommodations
• Potential impacts
• Desirability & Suitability
Feasibility Study--continued
• Does the venue or community have a track record
of hosting successful events?
• What are the population characteristics?
• Are sponsors available?
• Is there a potential pool of volunteers?
• What is the economy?
• What are the politics and/or
ideology of the community?
Feasibility--Economics
• Estimate the likely costs and revenues—calculate
the financial feasibility
• Can the financial cost be met?
• What happens if revenue falls short or costs
escalate—who pays?
• Consider possibility of political disruption or bad
weather
• Is a formal EIA required?
Decision to Proceed or Terminate
• The feasibility analysis will lead to a decision or to
a modification of the original concept.
• The Decision-making process may involve public
input (if you have governmental sponsors).
• If it is a for-profit event, poor feasibility should
lead to termination of abandonment of the
project,
• For a governmental unit, tax
dollars may be available to
cover shortfalls
Preliminary Plan Elements
• Feasibility of venues, targets, cost, revenues,
impacts, and approvals
• A program outline for the event
• A preliminary budget
• Schedule for construction (if required)
• A preliminary marketing plan
• Identification of human resources
• Organization and
management systems
Approval/Termination
• Once the preliminary plan is written, it should
be submitted for approval
• Approval may come from a private client, a
commercial group, an organization, or a
governmental entity
• Once approval is received,
detailed planning commences
• If not approved, either modify
or shelve (terminate)
Detailed Planning—Task Analysis
• The process begins with a task analysis and
work plan
• This will be followed by a critical path analysis
• A task is a discrete activity that can be
performed by one or more people with known
resources, within a defined
period of time
• All tasks will eventually be
integrated and scheduled
Tasks, continued
• Tasks are assigned to various people
(managers, subcontractors, work groups)
• Clusters need to be established in the
beginning
– geographical (the stage, the exhibition floor,
the food court, etc.)
– functional (marketing, human resouces)
– Technical (audio-visual, lighting)
Task Analysis breakdown
Event goals, budget, schedule
5.1.4 Police Presence
1 Venue
5.1.3 Staffing
2 Marketing
5.1.2 Signs & Barriers
3 Sponsorship
5.1 Parking
4 Program
5 Logistics
6 Administration
5.2 Public Transport
5.3 Supplies
5.4 Performers
5.5 Ticketing/Cash
5.1.1 Site Preparation
Scheduling of Tasks
• Usually, the event date is set—this is the final
deadline, and all tasks need to be scheduled
for completion before this date
• Initiation of certain tasks may depend upon
completion of other tasks
• The sequencing of these tasks
may involve CPA (Critical
Path Analysis) or PERT
Program Evaluation and
Review Technique
Critical Path Analysis
• Tasks are arranged in chronological order,
working backward from the event date
• Each prerequisite activity is scheduled in the
proper sequence
• This results in a network of interconnected
tasks which is the Critical Path
Steps in critical path analysis
• 1 identify all crucial tasks
• 2 set and prioritize goals
and objectives
• 3 determine time lines
and critical dates
• 4 establish the critical
path
• 5 establish controls for
the process
Program Evaluation and Review Technique
• Similar to CPA but does not work backward
from a date
• PERT is based on identification of minimum,
most likely, and maximum projected time lines
• Like CPA, it imposes logic on the planning
process and involves the task analysis process
• In PERT, resources are
assigned to the tasks
• Control is maintained
The Network
C
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Network Notes
• Computer software is often employed in this
process—the better ones are both expensive and
complex
• Avoid “looping” in complex networks—a situation
in which completion of an activity appears to be
dependent upon a later one
• There should be no “dangling” or loose activities
which are not followed by
another
More on CPA and PERT
• Project software will facilitate resource
analysis
• Project software can generate calendars and
Gantt charts
Decision Points
• Specific decision points should be
predetermined to force “go, no-go” decisions
• These decision points may apply to the event
as a whole, or to determine if some parts of
the program will or will not be included
Elements of Plan Implementation
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Risk analysis / risk management plan
Contingency plans
Emergency procedures
Training
Information and Marketing
Terminating the Event
• Paying bills and collecting all promised and
owed revenues
• Auditing the accounts
• Filing and processing insurance claims
• Settling any lawsuits
• Cleaning and closing venues
• Disposal of land or resources
• Thanking, rewarding, and
out-placing staff and volunteers
Microsoft Project
• Microsoft Projet

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