Discovery Meeting Presentation

Report
Discovery Meeting:
Finger Lakes/ Seneca
Watershed
FEMA REGION II
May 6-14, 2014
Finger Lakes Contributing Watersheds
Agenda
 Introductions
 Purpose of This Meeting
 Risk MAP Program Overview
 Discovery Process
 Flood Risk Products
 Finger Lakes* Watershed Data
 Mitigation Planning
* Seneca HUC8 = Finger Lakes Watershed
 NFIP and Community Rating System
 Risk Communication
 Next Steps
 Discussion Session
2
Introductions
Project Team
 FEMA Region II:
FEMA Region II Representative
RSC Representative
 New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
William Nechamen – Chief of Floodplain Management
Jennifer Horton – Environmental Engineer
Dave Sherman – Environmental Program Specialist

Bergmann / Atkins team
Cleighton Smith, Senior Water Resources Engineer – Bergmann
Jacob Tysz, Senior Scientist I – Atkins
Cidney Jones, Water Resource Engineer – Bergmann
3
Who’s Here?
 State or Federal Representatives
 County Officials
 Local Communities
• CEOs/Elected Officials
• Floodplain Administrators
• Emergency Planners
• Town Engineers
 Non-Governmental Organizations
 Private sector
 Other
4
Does Your Community …
 Have a designated floodplain administrator?
 Have GIS capabilities?
 Have an approved hazard mitigation plan?
 Participate in the Community Rating System?
 Have coordinated comprehensive and hazard
mitigation plans?
5
Purpose of This Meeting
 Explain the Discovery process
 Share your concerns about flood risk
 Share any additional flood data you may have:
• Areas of recent or proposed development
• Areas of historical flooding
• Overstated or understated flood hazard areas
• Areas of possible mitigation interest
• Risk communication needs
 Explain the FEMA flood risk products and how they can
increase your community’s resilience from floods
 Share your thoughts on which FEMA flood risk products
or mitigation projects you would like in your community
6
What is Risk MAP?
 FEMA works with communities to develop flood risk
products and flood hazard maps that are:
 Based on the best available data from the community and
latest technologies
 Conducted on a watershed basis
 You can use Risk MAP tools and data to:
 Improve and implement your Hazard Mitigation
Plans
 Use information to influence decisions about
development, ordinances, and flood mitigation projects
 Communicate with citizens about flood risk
 Our common goal: to maintain the sustainability of
your community by increasing its resilience from
floods and other natural hazards
7
Sustainable Communities
 Sustainability
• “meets the needs of the present without
compromising the ability of future
generations to meet their own needs”
• Traditional indicators of sustainability are
social, economic and environmental health
 Sustainable Communities Take Action to Reduce
Risk and Mitigate Hazards
• By mitigating against natural hazards, and reducing
vulnerability to them, we are enhancing sustainability
• Sustainable communities minimize exposure of
people and property to natural disasters; sustainable
communities are disaster-resilient communities.
8
Shifting from MapMod to Risk MAP
Risk MAP = Risk Mapping, Assessment, and Planning
9
Risk MAP Project Flowchart
10
Discovery Process
 FEMA and communities “discover” and assess flood risk data
 Discovery Data Collection Period
• Stakeholder coordination and data analysis
 Discovery Meeting
• Initial Discovery Map
 Post-Meeting Review
• Final Discovery Map and Discovery Report
 Scope Refinement
Watershed
Stakeholder
Coordination
Data
Analysis
Discovery
Meeting and
follow up
11
PostMeeting
Review
Scope
Refinement
Discovery Products and Results
• Discovery Report
– Including summary of data, analysis,
meetings, and action items or
decisions
• Discovery Map
– Visual representation of meeting
outcomes and feedback from
stakeholders
• Project Study Areas
• Index of FIRM Panels to be Updated
• National Metrics
12
Project materials posted to the RAMPP
website and available to you include:
 Pre-Discovery Webinar Presentation and Meeting Notes
 DRAFT Discovery Report, including Appendices and Attachments
 Meeting PowerPoint presentation
 Wall Maps used at meetings
https://www.rampp-team.com/ny.htm
Scroll down near the bottom of the page to:
13
Opportunities for Collaboration
 Project Charter/Cooperating Technical
Partnership
 GIS capabilities
 Public/private partnerships
 Education and outreach
 Strategic communications plan
development
 Information materials development
and dissemination
 Media relations
 Training
 Web site and social media links
14
Flood Risk Products
Traditional Regulatory Products
Non-Regulatory Products (new for Risk MAP)
DFIRM Database
Traditional products are
regulatory and subject to statutory
due-process requirements
Risk MAP products are nonregulatory and are not subject to
statutory due-process requirements
15
Flood Risk Report
 Increase General Flood Risk Awareness
• Risk and Causes
• Risk Reduction Techniques and Mitigation
Practices
 Deliver Community and Project Level Results
• Project Results Summarized by:
− Communities
− Watershed or Project Area
 Provide Information to Augment or Enhance
Other Efforts
• Local Hazard Mitigation Planning
• Local Emergency Management Planning
• Local Planning and Building Development
16
Changes Since
Last FIRM
Unchanged
Unchanged
SFHA Increase
SFHA Increase
SFHA Decrease
Unchanged
17
17
Flood Depth and Analysis Grids
 Datasets that show
depth, velocity, and
probability of flood
inundation as functions
of event’s magnitude
 Serves as key inputs to
HAZUS Risk
Assessment Analyses
 Increases flood risk
awareness
18
Flood Risk Assessment
 Identifies flood-prone areas and vulnerable
people and property
 Provides estimate of potential damage
HAZUS MH
Flood Risk Assessment
19
Areas of Mitigation Interest
 Dataset that shows items that may have an
impact (positive or negative) on the identified
flood hazards and/or flood risks
 Examples include:
•
•
Riverine and coastal flood control structures
(e.g. dams, levees, coastal berms, etc.)
•
At risk essential facilities and emergency
routes that could overtopped
•
•
•
Stream flow constrictions (e.g. undersized
culverts and bridge openings, etc.)
Previous assistance and claims “Hot Spots”
(clusters of IA and PA claims, RL)
•
Significant land use changes
•
Significant riverine or coastal erosion
•
Locations of successful mitigation projects
 Enhanced/optional product
20
Finger Lakes/ Seneca Watershed
•
Study area is located in New York within FEMA Region II, New York
−
Cayuga County
−
Onondaga County
−
Ontario County
−
Schuyler County
−
Seneca County
−
Tompkins County
−
Wayne County
−
Yates County
And small portions of
−
Chemung County
−
Cortland County
−
Livingston County
−
Monroe County
−
Steuben County
−
Tioga County
21
Why Finger Lakes Watershed?
 Age of maps and availability of recent data
 Areas of high annual losses
 Numerous LOMC
 Incidence of repetitive loss structures
 Number of declared flood disasters
22
Data Collection and Collaboration
 Discovery is the process of data mining, collection, and analysis with
the goal of investigating a flood risk or mitigation project or risk
discussions within a watershed.
 The following data was researched and reviewed before the meeting:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Average Annualized Loss data
Repetitive Loss Data
LOMCs
Effective Data (FIS, DFIRM, FIRM)
List of Communities & Contact Info
Hazard Mitigation Plan (online)
Hazard Mitigation Assistance Program grants
received
• Individual or Public Assistance information
• Disaster history or history of disaster
declarations
CRS, NFIP status
MNUSS –flood hazard mapping needs
High Water Marks
Dams and/or levees
Mid-term Levee Inventory (MLI)
Topo/Elevation Data
Gages
NHD streamline
Various GIS data for the discovery products
Structure Info (bridges, culverts)
23
Elevation Data Acquisition
• LiDAR for Wayne, Seneca, Yates, Schuyler and portions of
Onondaga Counties are in progress this Spring
24
Data Collection: Effective Studies
County
Cayuga*
Chemung
Cortland*
Livingston (Springwater)
Monroe (Penfield and Perinton)
Effective FIRM Date
2007
1983 – 1996
2010
1984
Ontario
2008
1979 – 1999
Prelim 6/30/2008
1977 -- 2004
Schuyler
1978 – 1988
Seneca
1979 – 1988
Steuben
Tioga (Spencer)
1977 – 1995
2012
Tompkins
Wayne
Yates
1979 – 1988
1977--1992
1981 – 2001
Onondaga
*Countywide FIRM
25
 Current FIRMs outdated –
some date to 1970s
• Changes in NFIP policies and
methodologies have since
occurred, creating need for an
update
Discovery Map: Flood Risk
26
Discovery Map: Potential Loss
27
Data We Need from You
 Review data collected during pre-Discovery meetings
 Areas of Concern
• Areas of recent or planned development
• Areas of high growth or other significant land changes
 Areas of historical flooding
 Other flood risks
 Mitigation projects
 Your ideas about Risk MAP products and mitigation projects that may help
your community
 Your ideas about other ways to increase your community’s resilience from
flooding
To explain some of the actions that your community may take to reduce risk,
we’ll review mitigation grants and planning and participation in the NFIP
program
28
Hazard Mitigation Planning
 Risk MAP and Mitigation Planning
Coordinated
and
participative
• Local hazard mitigation plans must be
updated every five (5) years.
Planning
Process
Refer to
the Plan &
• Use new Risk MAP information to
update local HMP.
Identify
hazards that
can affect the
jurisdiction
Keep it
Current
• Flood Hazard Profile
• Risk Assessment
Mitigation
Planning
Cycle
Adopt the
plan and
implement
the
mitigation
strategy
• Mitigation Strategy
Assess the
risks from
these
hazards
Develop
strategy to
mitigate
the risks
29
Categories of Flood Mitigation
Activities
30
Possible Mitigation Activities
Mitigation should be part of overall hazard mitigation plan
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
2 foot of freeboard for new structures.
Cumulative substantial improvement
clause.
List of publicly owned buildings that
have flood risk.
Acquisition of flood prone structures.
County GIS system.
Updated weather tracking equipment.
Stream bank stabilization projects
Identified sanitary sewer mains
vulnerable to erosion from flood
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
31
Adopted a wellhead protection ordinance.
Vulnerability assessment of water and
wastewater infrastructure.
Elevate, move and acquire flood
damaged structures.
Identify vulnerable critical facilities.
Implement mitigation measures for
repetitive loss properties.
Require elevation of new structures and
substantially improved structures.
Natural stream restoration
Mitigation Grant Programs (FEMA)
• Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP)
Available after a major disaster declaration - the amount
of funding is 15% of the total federal assistance provided
by FEMA for disaster recovery under the major disaster
declaration.
• Pre-Disaster Mitigation (PDM)
Nationally competitive grant program that funds cost
effective, comprehensive mitigation activities that reduce
injuries, loss of life, and damage to property.
32
Mitigation Grant Programs - FEMA
(cont’d)
• Flood Mitigation Assistance (FMA)
Provides funding to assist States and communities in
implementing measures to reduce or eliminate the longterm risk of flood damage to buildings, manufactured
homes, and other structures insured under the NFIP.
FMA incorporates the former Flood Mitigation Assistance
Program with the former Repetitive Flood Claims and
Severe Repetitive Loss Grant programs.
33
Mitigation Grant and Loan Programs
 NYSOEM Manages FEMA Mitigation Grant Programs
 NYSDEC: Stream Restoration and Water Quality Improvement
Grants
 NYS Office of Community Renewal
 NYS Department of State
 NYS Environmental Facilities Corporation
 NYS Energy Research and Development Authority
 NYS Department of State Office of Communities and Waterfronts
 Corps of Engineers
 HUD
 NRCS
34
National Flood Insurance Program
 Allows property owners to
purchase flood insurance at
below market rates
 State and local governments
agree to adopt and enforce
floodplain management
ordinances
 Over 20,300 communities
participate in the NFIP
• 1,490 in New York
35
Community Rating System (CRS)
 Flood insurance premium rates discounted to reward community
actions that reduce flood losses, facilitate accurate insurance ratings,
and promote the awareness of flood insurance

Class rating system from 1 to 10

Each Class improvement (500 point increments) results in additional
5% discount

Uniform minimum credits give you points for activities on the state
level (state laws) and make achieving a Class 9 relatively easy

18 creditable activities, organized under four categories:
•
Public Information
•
Mapping and Regulations
•
Flood Damage Reduction
•
Flood Preparation

http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/CRS/

Three communities in the watershed participate in CRS
36
Recommended Higher Standards
• Go Beyond 2 feet of freeboard
• Restrictions on hazardous material storage
• Regulated high risk land uses (e.g. manufactured homes/critical
infrastructure)
• Setbacks/Buffers
• Conservation/open space area
• Cumulative Substantial Damage/Substantial Improvement
• Lower threshold for Substantial Damage
• Subdivision design triggering flood study
• Prohibitions
 SFHA development
 Manufactured homes
 Fill
• Community Identified Flood Areas
37
Risk Communication
 Federal/State/Local goals:
• To reduce risk to life and property, ensure safer, sustainable
communities
• To effectively communicate risk and increase public awareness,
leading citizens to make informed decisions regarding their risk
 Key factors contributing to successful achievement of these goals
are:
• Community engagement and exchange of flood risk information
• Effective collaboration through partnerships
• Strategic communications plan development
• Local understanding and implementation of mitigation action and
strategies
38
Next Steps
 Communities will provide additional data
 NYS DEC will:
• finalize Discovery Map and Discovery Report and
distribute to communities and other stakeholders
• update FEMA systems (Coordinated Needs
Management Strategy, National Digital
Elevation/Orthophotography Programs, etc.)
• prepare Scope of Work for any Risk MAP projects
 Communities and FEMA will coordinate regarding
Community Cooperation Agreement, signed by the
highest elected official, regarding community’s
contribution to project
39
Feedback Deadline
 We need comments returned by June 20, 2014
 Digital comments can be submitted to the NYSDEC
floodplain mailbox:
[email protected]
 Written comments can be sent to:
New York State Department of Environmental
Conservation
Attention: Jennifer Horton
Floodplain Management Section
625 Broadway, 4th Floor
Albany, NY 12233-3504
40
Resources
 Risk Assessment, Mapping and Planning Partners:
https://www.rampp-team.com/ny.htm – draft Discovery
report, PowerPoint presentation, and maps are posted
here
 FEMA: www.fema.gov
 FloodSmart, the official site of the National Flood
Insurance Program (NFIP): www.floodsmart.gov
 NFIP Reform:
www.fema.gov/business/nfip/nfip_reform.shtm
 National Committee on Levee Safety:
www.nfrmp.us/ncls
41
Contact Information
• FEMA :
• Paul Weberg: [email protected]
• NYS DEC
• William Nechamen: [email protected]
• Jennifer Horton: [email protected]
• Bergmann / Atkins
• Cleighton Smith: [email protected]
• Jacob Tysz: [email protected]
• Cidney Jones: [email protected]
This is a review of information already collected; chance to take
another look.
42
Discussion Session
 We want to hear from you!
 What are areas of recent or planned development or
high growth or other significant land changes?
 What other flood risks are there?
 What other mitigation plans and projects are there?
 Do any of the Risk MAP products make sense for
your community?
 What are your community’s concerns?
 How can we (both FEMA and you)
communicate risk within your
community and increase resilience
from floods?
43

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