Math Symposium PowerPoint

Report
Update on High School Assessments
and Graduation Requirements
Spokane Math Symposium
November 2014
Katy Absten
Math Specialist
OSPI
Washington Summative Assessments
2014–15 and beyond
English/LA
Mathematics
Grade 3
Smarter
Smarter
Grade 4
Smarter
Smarter
Grade 5
Smarter
Smarter
Grade 6
Smarter
Smarter
Grade 7
Smarter
Smarter
Grade 8
Smarter
Smarter
MSP
Grade10
Smarter ELA
exit exam
Year 1or Year 2
EOC exit exam
EOC Biology
exit exam (until NGSS)
Smarter
Smarter
(or below for EOCs)
(until Class of 2019)
Grade 11
Grade 11 or 12
(class of 2015 & 2016)
Science (no change)
MSP
HSPE Reading
and/or Writing
Retake
Smarter=Smarter Balanced Assessment; MSP=Measurements of Student
Progress;
EOC=End of Course exams; HSPE=High School proficiency Exam
Assessment Menu - Mathematics
General Assessments
• Smarter Balanced
Math
• Yr1 & Yr2 EOC Exit
Exams
Alternatives
• Collection of Evidence
• College Entrance Scores
– SAT, ACT, IB, AP
•
•
•
•
Out of State Tests
Grades Comparison
Recent Transfer Waiver
Special Education
Alternatives
• Bridge to College
Mathematics course…?
Claim distribution by grade/ course
What about Graduation?
Legislature has given the State Board the option to
set a different cut score for graduation purposes
The ELA exit exam cut score will be determined from
10th graders’ performance on the Smarter Balanced HS
ELA test (for classes of 2015-2018, at least).
Math EOC exit exam cut scores will be determined from
this year’s performance on new EOC tests (for classes
of 2015-2018). Exit exam cut score on Smarter
Balanced math may also be set next summer – SBE
discussion next month.
Graduation Cut-score on the 11th
Grade SBAC
Washington State Board of Education
Evolving Graduation
Requirements
Class of…
English Language Arts
2014
Reading
HSPE
2015
HSPEs or
Smarter Balanced
(Exit exam cut score)
HSPEs or
Smarter Balanced
(Exit exam cut score)
Smarter Balanced
(Exit exam cut score)
2016
2017 &
2018
2019 and
beyond
Writing
HSPE
Mathematics
Science
Either Algebra or
Geometry EOC
Either Algebra or
Geometry EOC/EOC Exit
Exam
Either Algebra or
Geometry EOC/EOC Exit
Exam or
Smarter Balanced
Smarter Balanced
11th Smarter Balanced
(College & Career Ready (College & Career Ready
cut score)
cut score)
Biology
EOC (until
Next Gen
Science
Standards)
Learn More and Stay Engaged



To experience the assessment yourself,
take the Practice Test:
www.SmarterBalanced.org/practice-test
For the latest news and developments on
Smarter Balanced in Washington:
http://www.k12.wa.us/smarter/default.aspx
For questions about Smarter Balanced or the
assessment system transitions, contact:
[email protected] 360-725-6348
Resources/Communications
• Webpages
– To learn more about the Smarter Balanced
Consortium: http://www.smarterbalanced.org/
– To learn more about Washington’s new
standards: http://www.readywa.org/
• Toolkits
– To learn more about graduation requirements in
WA:
http://www.k12.wa.us/GraduationRequirement
s/GraduationToolkit.aspx
– http://sbe.wa.gov/graduation.php
Using the Smarter Balanced 11th
Grade Assessment in Washington
Higher Education Student
Placement & the Role of High
School Transition Courses
November 2014
Bill Moore,
Director, Core to College & K-12 Partnerships
360-704-4346, [email protected]
Core to College Project Goals
1. Build faculty ownership and understanding of
the CCSS as meaningful and useful collegereadiness standards
2. Promote local use of CCSS and Smarter
Balanced assessment in ways that improve
high school to college transition for students
3. Develop overall higher education agreement
for use of CCSS and Smarter Balanced
assessment
WA Core to College web site
Higher Education Agreements on Smarter Balanced
11th Grade Assessment
 Offer high school students the opportunity to use their SBAC
11th grade scores to place into college-level courses without
remediation or additional placement testing
 Apply to placement considerations at public 2- and 4-year
institutions in WA for any students enrolling directly after high
school graduation with SBAC 11th grade scores
 Will be in effect for the graduating classes of 2016-2018,
then reviewed and adjusted if necessary based on student
performance data
 Details at http://www.wsac.wa.gov/college-readiness or
http://c2cwa.wordpress.com/final-sbac-agreement_wa/
Smarter Balanced Agreement:
CTCs
11th Grade
Score
Level
4
3
Math Placement Options Available Based on Score
Any entry college-level math course through pre-calculus
I
 An entry college-level terminal math course not on the
calculus pathway
 An entry-level calculus pathway math course,
contingent on a B or better in a calculus pathway class
in the senior year of high school
Smarter Balanced Agreement (2): CTCs
11th
Grade
Score
Level
2
1
Math Placement Options Available Based on Score
An entry college-level terminal math course not on the
calculus pathway, contingent on a B or better in the
statewide math college readiness/transition course or
through local institutional processes (transcript, high
school GPA, additional testing, etc.)
Additional placement information, determined by local
institutional processes (transcript, high school GPA,
additional testing, etc.), needed for all entry-level courses
Smarter Balanced Agreement: Public
Baccalaureates
Strategies for College Readiness and Success
Avoidance
Diagnosis & Placement
Curricular Interventions
Student Supports
adapted from an ECS Resource Guide
What is the “right math”?
Students Who Take College Algebra
10%
Virtually no students who
pass college algebra ever
start Calculus III, which is a
key course for STEM majors.
30%
60%

•
College algebra and traditional
developmental math sequences were
designed in the 1950’s to prepare
students for calculus.
But the majority of students are in
majors that do not require calculus.
Ever Take Calculus 1
Take Business
Calculus
Do Not Take Any
Form of Calculus
Dunbar, S. 2005. Enrollment flow to and from courses below
calculus . In A Fresh State for Collegiate mathematics:
Rethinking the Courses below calculus, N.B. Hastings et al.
(Eds.). Washington DC: MAA Notes, Mathematical
Association of America.
17
Recommendations from the Math Community
18
“Avoidance” Strategy: Transition Courses
Define key
standards
Core to
College
grant
Determine
course
framework, pilot
course
materials
Recruit districts
& provide
professional
development
for teachers
Jointly developed
and led by higher
ed faculty and high
school teachers
College
Spark grant
(10/1412/17)
Building a Bridge to College
Mathematics
Katy Absten
Math Specialist
OSPI
Bill Moore
Director, K-12 Partnerships
SBCTC
Bridge to College Mathematics
A Core to College Project
Goal: Develop transition curricula in English and Math,
co-designed by higher education faculty and high school
teachers and curriculum specialists, that could be offered
to high school seniors by any interested school district in
Washington state.
• Students successfully completing the curricula and the end-ofcourse assessments would be guaranteed placement into
college-level coursework if they go directly into a Washington
higher education institution.
Non-Calculus/STEM pathways
OSPI Math Webinar_Part 4_ 5-29-2014
21
Transition Course:
Bridge to College Mathematics
 Designed for students who score below
“college-ready” on the 11th grade Smarter
Balanced assessment
 Addresses key standards in Common Core to
prepare students for success in non-calculus
pathway college math classes
 Embeds explicit emphasis in Standards for
Mathematical Practices throughout the
course
Current Partners










School Districts
Community Colleges
ESD RMCs
South Kitsap SD
Central Kitsap SD
Battleground SD
Central Valley SD
Battleground SD
Grandview SD
Shoreline SD
Rochester SD
Mead SD
Kelso SD
•




 ESD 114
 ESD 121
Cascadia CC
Spokane Falls CC
Shoreline CC
Peninsula CC
Clark CC
Spring 2014 Design Team
• Draft course standards document based on
April joint K-12 & higher ed meeting
• Search for Common Core aligned instructional
materials
• Select SREB Math Ready materials & create
WAMAP units for pilot course.
SREB Math Ready!
• The Southern Regional Education Board works
with 16 member states to improve public
education at every level, from pre-K through
Ph.D.
• High school courses to ensure readiness
– Focused on the reading/writing and math CRS
– Students assessed as not ready must take courses
in grade 11 or 12
– Success in course signifies readiness
SREB Materials
General goals: experience and understand the
structures of the course
3 main components
• Formative Assessment Lessons
(MARS/MAP/MDC/Shell Center) Each unit has at least
1 @ 2/3 through unit. Designed so the
common misconceptions emerge.
• Hooks—Each unit starts with a “hook” to
engage students and pre-assess—frame of
reference throughout unit.
• Tasks that make up the day to day instruction.
Smarter Balanced
Assessment Claims
• Claim 1 – Concepts & Procedures – The student can explain
and apply mathematical concepts and interpret and carry
out mathematical procedures with precision and fluency.
• Claim 2 – Problem Solving – The student can solve a range
of complex well-posed problems in pure and applied
mathematics, making productive use of knowledge and
problem solving strategies.
• Claim 3 – Communicating Reasoning – The student can
clearly and precisely construct viable arguments to support
their own reasoning and to critique the reasoning of others.
• Claim 4 – Modeling and Data Analysis – The student can
analyze complex, real-world scenarios and can construct and
use mathematical models to interpret and solve problems.
Summer 2014: June 25-26, August 4-7
Pilot teams and community college faculty review & refine
units, develop common vision for course culture
SREB alignment to draft course standards
Achieve EQUIP Rubric
I. Alignment to the Depth of the CCSS
II. Key Shifts in the CCSS
III. Instructional Supports
IV. Assessment
Continuous cycle of learning together to deepen our
understanding of CCSS-M and refine the work
Timeline & Vision
• May-June 2014: Design team creates draft course: 8
units
• Summer 2014: Pilot teams review & refine units,
develop common vision for course culture
• 2014-2015: Cycle of implementation &
refinement of pilot course materials, deepen
focus on course culture.
• 2015 and beyond: College Spark funding for
continued implementation support scaling up
statewide
OSPI Math Webinar_Part 4_ 5-29-2014
30
2014-2015 Pilot Network
Cycle of implementation & refinement of pilot course
materials, deepen focus on course culture.
3 Regions:
• Eastside: Mead, Grandview, Central Valley
• Southwest: Battleground, Kelso, Rochester
• Puget Sound: Shoreline, Northshore, Seattle, Central
Kitsap, South Kitsap
Online WAMAP collaboration & feedback
Fall & Spring regional meetings
Winter retreat
OSPI Math Webinar_Part 4_ 5-29-2014
31
Transition Courses: Next Steps
 Seeking teachers/districts interested in betatesting English course units in current school
year
 Recruiting districts interested in offering the
full math and/or English courses beginning in
2015-16 school year
 Identifying statewide leaders/trainers in math
and English to train and support teachers in
teaching the courses
Summer 2015
Scaling up
Subgroup of pilot teachers refine the materials @
feedback from the year.
Statewide trainer and regional leader preparation
New teacher training.
2015-2016 Statewide Implementation
• 75-100 districts>>>150 teachers
• Geographic cohorts>>>regional training &
collaboration

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