Rubrics

Report
Best Practices In College Teaching:
Designing Effective Rubrics
Debra Dunlap Runshe
Have you ever had a student look at
you like this?
Have you ever felt like this?
Do you need a rubric?
If you agree with any of these statements a rubric
may be for you…
 You are getting carpal tunnel syndrome from writing the
same comments on almost every student paper.
 You have graded all your papers and worry that the last ones
were graded slightly differently from the first ones.
 You’ve sometimes been disappointed by whole assignments
because all or most of your class turned out to be unaware of
academic expectations so basic that you neglected to
mention them (e.g., the need for citations or page numbers).
(Stevens & Levi, 2005)
Webinar Objectives
By the end of this webinar, you will be able to:
 articulate how rubrics can be useful.
 describe characteristics of a rubric.
 distinguish between analytic and holistic rubrics.
 design a rubric.
Where are you now?
Do you use rubrics to assess student work?
If so, how?
What do you already know about rubrics?
What are some things you want to learn about
using rubrics to assess student work?
Definition of a Rubric
Rubrics are criterion-referenced rules for assessing
student performance holistically or analytically (on
different dimensions).
A scoring tool that lays out the specific expectations
for an assignment, providing a detailed description of
what constitutes acceptable or unacceptable levels of
performance. (Stevens & Levi, 2005).
Parts of a Rubric
 Task description
 A scale
 Dimensions of the assignment
 Descriptions of performance level
(Stevens & Levi, 2005)
Analytic vs. Holistic Rubrics
Analytic rubric: Common when evaluating
independent dimensions or components of student
work.
Holistic rubric: Common when the assessed
criteria are considered in combination and when
quality is judged broadly.
Holistic Rubric
Task Description
Scale
Level 1
Scale
Level 2
Scale
Level 3
•Dimension 1 description
•Dimension 2 description
•Dimension 3 description
Scale
Level 4
Scale
Level 5
•Dimension 1 description
•Dimension 2 description
•Dimension 3 description
•Dimension 1 description
•Dimension 2 description
•Dimension 3 description
•Dimension 1 description
•Dimension 2 description
•Dimension 3 description
•Dimension 1 description
•Dimension 2 description
•Dimension 3 description
Holistic Rubric
Article Review
A
•Insightful development and mature style
•Cogent analysis of or response to the text
•Uses sophisticate sentences effectively
B
•Clearly competent
•Thoughtful analysis of or response to the text
•Less fluent and complex style than 6, but chooses words accurately, varies
sentences effectively
C
•Satisfactory
•Adequate analysis of response to the text
•Usually chooses words of sufficient precision, sentences of reasonable variety
D
•Unsatisfactory in one of more ways
•May analyze or respond to text illogically
•Frequently imprecise word choice and little sentence variety
F
•Serious weaknesses, of several kinds
•Simplistic, inappropriate, or incoherent analysis of or response to text
•Inaccurate word choice, monotonous or fragmented sentence structure
Analytic Rubric
Task Description
Scale
Level 1
Dimension 1
Dimension 2
Dimension 3
Scale
Level 2
Scale
Level 3
Scale
Level 4
Analytic Rubric
Oral Presentation
Exemplary
Competent
Content
Full understanding
of topic
Good Understanding Does not seem to
of parts of topic
understand topic
Stays on topic
Stays on topic
Stays on topic
100-95% if the time 94-75-% if the time
It was hard to tell
what the topic was
Preparedness
Completely
prepared and has
obviously
rehearsed
Does not seem at
all prepared to
present
Eye contact
Establishes eye
contact with
everyone in the
room
Somewhat
prepared, but it is
clear that rehearsal
was lacking
Sometimes
establishes eye
contact
Developing
Does not look at
people during the
presentation
Constructing a Rubric
A rubric is a protocol for grading based on:
 critical components
 scoring scale
So, what is worth grading on (the components)?
What is worth grading on?
 Comprehensive literature




review
Clarity of rational for
chosen research design
including importance to
field
Understanding of
methodology to be used
Includes and addresses
potential limitations and
implications for practice
Proper references to texts,
other resources
 Organization, conformity






to format
Precision of measurement,
quality of data
Clarity of explanations,
expression
Strength/tightness of
arguments
Grammar and mechanics
Writing style
Use of APA Style
Constructing a Rubric
Four Important Steps
1. Reflection
2. Listing of Objectives
3. Grouping and Labeling
4. Application of Scales
(Stevens & Levi, 2005)
Step 1: Reflection
Eight questions to consider:
1. Why did you create assignment?
2. Have you given this or similar assignment before?
3. How does the assignment relate to the rest of the
course?
4. What skills do students need for successful
completion?
5. What exactly is the task assigned?
6. What evidence can students provide to show they
have successfully completed the assignment?
7. What does an exemplary product look like?
8. What does the worst example of a product look like?
(Stevens & Levi, 2005)
Step 1: Reflection
Objectives
Activities
Assessment
Step 2: Listing of Objectives
What specific learning objectives are for this
assignment?
What is the highest level of performance you
expect for each learning goal?
Step 3: Grouping and Labeling
Dimensions of an Academic Research Proposal
Research Question
Literature Review
Methodology
Limitations and Significances
Transitions
Grammar and Style
Step 4: Application of Scales
 Exemplary, proficient, marginal, unacceptable
 Advanced, intermediate high, intermediate, novice
 Distinguished, proficient, intermediate, novice
 Accomplished, average, developing, beginning
 Outstanding, very good, good, poor, unsatisfactory
 A, B, C, D, F
 Satisfactory, unsatisfactory
Scoring Scale Example
“Elegance of Argument” component:
5
Original and clearly stated thesis; persuasive,
well-organized, imaginative use of source
material
4
Clearly stated thesis; good use of sources; well
organized
3
Facts straight with reasonable explanation of the
subject under consideration
2
Poorly stated thesis, inadequate survey of
available sources, poor organization
1
No awareness of argument or complexity
Let’s Create a Rubric
 Think about building a rubric for buying a house.
 Identify the components that are critical in
completing this task.
 Write the descriptive levels for the components.
Step 1: Reflection
Step 2: Listing of Objectives
Step 3: Grouping and Labeling
Step 4: Application of Scales
Advantages of a Clear Rubric
 Provides timely feedback
 Prepares students to use detailed feedback
 Encourages critical thinking
 Facilitates communications with others
 Helps refine teaching methods
 Levels the playing field
(Stevens & Levi, 2005)
Rubrics Help Students to Self-assess
 Provide examples of work corresponding to
different levels
 Provide coaching on components of quality before
the whole assignment is undertaken
 Have students use the rubric to assess each other’s
practice assignments and develop norms of
fairness
 Have students use the rubric to assess their own
work and provide feedback on their selfassessment
Other Considerations
 Research other rubrics
 Peer evaluation
 Revise, revise, revise
eTools for Rubric Construction
RubiStar:
http://rubistar.4teachers.org
iRubric:
http://www.rcampus.com/indexrubric.cfm
AAC& U’s VALUE Project
(Retrieved from www.aacu.org/value/metarubrics.cfm August 22, 2011)
VALUE Rubrics
Learning Outcomes for the development of VALUE Rubrics
Intellectual and Practical Skills
 Inquiry and analysis
 Critical thinking
 Creative thinking
 Written communication
 Oral communication
 Reading
 Quantitative literacy
 Information literacy
 Teamwork
 Problem solving
Personal and Social Responsibility
 Civic knowledge and engagementlocal and global
 Intercultural knowledge and
competence
 Ethical reasoning
 Foundations and skills for lifelong
learning
Integrative and Applied Learning
 Integrative and applied learning
Summary
During this webinar, we:
 discussed how rubrics can be useful.
 described characteristics of a rubric.
 distinguished between analytic and holistic rubrics.
 designed a rubric.
Why use rubrics?
So students look like this …
Thank you for your participation!
Debra Dunlap Runshe, Instructional Development Specialist
University Information Technology Services
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis
Information Technology and Communications Complex (IT 342H)
535 West Michigan Street, Indianapolis, IN 46202
Phone: 317-278-0589
Email: [email protected]
References and Resources
ALTEC at University of Kansas. RubiStar. Web site:
http://rubistar.4teachers.org
Carnegie Mellon, Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence. Grading and
performance rubrics. Retrieved June 11, 2010 from
http://www.cmu.edu/teaching//designteach/teach/rubrics.html
Kansas State University, Office of Assessment. Measures, rubrics, & tools for
assessing student learning outcomes. Web site: http://www.kstate.edu/assessment/plans/measures/samples/index.htm
McGonigal, K. (2006, spring). Getting more “teaching” out of “testing” and
“grading." Speaking of Teaching, 15, 2. Retrieved June 11, 2010 from
http://ctl.stanford.edu/Tomprof/postings/738.html
Moskal, B. M. (2003). Recommendations for developing classroom
performance assessments and scoring rubrics [Electronic version]. Practical
Assessment, Research & Evaluation, 8(14). Retrieved June 11, 2010 from
http://pareonline.net/getvn.asp?v=8&n=14
Moskal, B. M. (2000). Scoring rubrics: what, when and how? [Electronic
version]. Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation, 7(3). Retrieved
June 11, 2010 from http://PAREonline.net/getvn.asp?v=7&n=3
References and Resources
Palomba, C.A., & Banta, T.W. (1999). Assessment essentials: Planning,
implementing, and improving assessment in higher education. San
Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
Quinlan, A. M. (2006). A complete guide to rubrics: Assessment made easy for
teachers, K-college. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.
Reazon System, Inc. iRubric. Web site:
http://www.rcampus.com/indexrubric.cfm
rSmart, a Sakai Commercial Affiliate. Resources for teaching and learning.
Web site: http://openedpractices.org/resources
Simkins, M. (1999). Designing great rubrics. Technology & Learning, 20 (1),
23-24, 28-30.
Stevens, D. D. & Levi, A. J. (2005). Introduction to rubrics. Sterling, VA: Stylus.
Suskie, L. (2009). Assessing student learning: A common sense guide. (2nd
ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
TLT Group. Rubrics. Web site: http://www.tltgroup.org/resources/Rubrics.htm
Walvoord, B.E. (2010). Effective grading: A tool for learning and assessment.
San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
Quick Guide to Rubrics
What are rubrics?
A rubric is a criterion-referenced scoring tool for assessment linked to learning objectives that is used
to assess a student's performance. Rubrics allow for standardized evaluation according to specified
criteria, making grading simpler and more transparent.
What benefits do rubric offer, and to whom?
Rubrics benefit both the instructor and the students. They are used both to guide student learning
and to assess student learning outcomes.
Creating rubrics
Steps in creating rubrics include: 1) articulate the objective(s) of the assignment; 2) identify criteria to
be evaluated; 3) determine the levels of performance across the criteria; 4) describe the performance
at the various levels for each criterion.
Resources for rubric creation
AAC&U’s VALUE rubrics from www.aacu.org/value/metarubrics.cfm
Rubistar http://rubistar.4teachers.org
iRubric http://www.rcampus.com/indexrubric.cfm
Rubric Template
(Describe here the task or performance that this rubric is designed to evaluate.)
Stated Objective or
Performance
Stated Objective or
Performance
Stated Objective or
Performance
Stated Objective or
Performance
Beginning
1
Developing
2
Accomplished
3
Exemplary
4
Description of identifiable
performance characteristics
reflecting a beginning level of
performance.
Description of identifiable
performance characteristics
reflecting development and
movement toward mastery of
performance.
Description of identifiable
performance characteristics
reflecting mastery of
performance.
Description of identifiable
performance characteristics
reflecting the highest level of
performance.
Description of identifiable
performance characteristics
reflecting a beginning level of
performance.
Description of identifiable
performance characteristics
reflecting development and
movement toward mastery of
performance.
Description of identifiable
performance characteristics
reflecting mastery of
performance.
Description of identifiable
performance characteristics
reflecting the highest level of
performance.
Description of identifiable
performance characteristics
reflecting a beginning level of
performance.
Description of identifiable
performance characteristics
reflecting development and
movement toward mastery of
performance.
Description of identifiable
performance characteristics
reflecting mastery of
performance.
Description of identifiable
performance characteristics
reflecting the highest level of
performance.
Description of identifiable
performance characteristics
reflecting a beginning level of
performance.
Description of identifiable
performance characteristics
reflecting development and
movement toward mastery of
performance.
Description of identifiable
performance characteristics
reflecting mastery of
performance.
Description of identifiable
performance characteristics
reflecting the highest level of
performance.
Score
Rubric Title (highlight and replace with your title)
(Description of task or performance - highlight and replace with your description.)
Score

similar documents