Survey on Income and Living Conditions (SILC)

Report
Survey on Income and Living
Conditions (SILC)
Pamela Lafferty
Statistician
CSO
Pamela Lafferty
Central Statistics Office 2012
Format of presentation
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•
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•
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Background
Doorstep to dataset
Indicators
What do the CSO do with the data?
What do EUROSTAT do with the data?
Access to the data
– RMF
– EU data
– AMF ISSDA
• Q&A session
Central Statistics Office 2012
Background to EU-SILC
• Launched in 2003 (under a gentleman's agreement)
replacing the LIIS which was run by the ESRI.
• Officially began in 2004 across Europe and is now being
carried out in 30 countries across Europe.
• Two types of data
– Cross sectional data
• pertaining to a given time or a certain time period with variables
on income, poverty, social exclusion and other living conditions
– Longitudinal data
• pertaining to individual-level changes over time, observed
periodically over, typically, a four year period.
Central Statistics Office 2012
Background to EU-SILC: Ireland
• SILC is a Sample survey in Ireland with a sample of
approximately 5000 households per year selected
using a two stage sample design
• Information is collected continuously throughout the
year with up to 130 interviews being conducted each
week.
• Response rate of close to 76% in 2010.
• Income reference period – 12 months prior to the date
of interview.
• Estimates are weighted up to population totals using a
grossing factor which is calculated using a combination
of Census and QNHS totals.
Central Statistics Office 2012
Doorstep to Dataset
Data from
Interview
Data is
sent to
EUROSTAT
CSO
Data is
validated
Data is
cleaned
&
verified
Population
weight is
created
Indicators
are
derived
Datasets are
created
Researchers
access the
data
Analysis is
completed
Data is
published
RMF is
created
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AMF is
created
Key Indicators
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•
•
•
•
•
•
Household Income
Equivalised income
Income Inequality
At Risk of Poverty rate
Material deprivation
Consistent Poverty rate
EU indicators
Central Statistics Office 2012
Other important data is collected on:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Health
Childcare
Over-indebtedness
Education
Housing conditions
Special modules e.g. Social Participation,
Intergenerational transmission of poverty.
Central Statistics Office 2012
What do the CSO do with the data?
• Main indicators are published by key sociodemographic characteristics.
• The results are presented to government officials
from relevant government departments.
• Results are also presented to the Minister for
Social Protection and other Ministers.
• Press conference to release the results to the
public.
• Thematic releases e.g. Elderly, Households with
children
Central Statistics Office 2012
What do the CSO do with the data?
• Requests for additional information from a range of users.
Examples:
- The Department of Health asked us to carry out some
analysis on health status by income quintile.
- The OECD requested health data by level of education.
- Age Action Ireland requested data on the income received
by the elderly on private & occupational pensions and
private health care by decile.
- In 2009 we completed some analysis for Amnesty
International on Medical and GP cards.
- Department of Social Protection – contribute to the
National Anti-poverty Strategy.
Central Statistics Office 2012
Main results: 2010
Figure 1 Poverty and deprivation rates by year
Rate %
40.0
35.0
30.0
25.0
20.0
15.0
10.0
5.0
0.0
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
At risk of poverty rate
Deprivation rate for those at risk of poverty
Deprivation rate for those not at risk of poverty
Consistent poverty rate
Central Statistics Office 2012
What do EUROSTAT do with the
data?
• The data files are transmitted to EUROSTAT from
each Member State by November 30th of each
year.
• EUROSTAT compile the data and calculate the key
indicators for the EU and each individual country.
• They produce a publication with the main results.
• They prepare microdata files that researchers can
access.
Central Statistics Office 2012
Main Results: EU
EU2020
Poverty
Target
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
EU-27
25.2%
24.4%
23.6%
23.1%
23.4%
Ireland
23.3%
23.1%
23.7%
25.7%
29.9%
EU Material
Deprivation
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
EU-27
19.0%
17.9%
17.3%
17.1%
17.5%
Ireland
11.4%
10.3%
13.6%
17.1%
19.6%
Central Statistics Office 2012
Access to the data: Ireland
• Resource constraints limit the amount of
special analysis.
• Encourage users to become Officers of
Statistics to gain access to the Research Micro
data File (RMF).
• This file contains the majority of the
information collected with the exception of
data which allows a respondent to be
identified.
Central Statistics Office 2012
Access to the data: Ireland
• Examples:
• ESRI SWITCH Model
– Based on SILC data
– Assessing the impact of policy changes
• Department of Health
– Required data for scenario analysis
– Wanted to assess the impact on the numbers with
medical cards if the thresholds were changed
Central Statistics Office 2012
Who has access to the RMF?
Bona fide researchers from the following
institutions also have access to the RMF:
– Social Inclusion Division
– Dept of Social Protection
– UCD, NUIG, TCD
– Department of Finance
– Department of Health
– Central Bank
– ESRI
Central Statistics Office 2012
Access to the data: EUROSTAT
EU micro data is available to researchers
carrying out statistical analyses for scientific
purposes. Individual micro data are
anonymised in such a way that statistical units
cannot be identified.
– Access is in principle restricted to universities,
research institutes, national statistical institutes,
central banks inside the EU and EEA countries, as
well as to the European Central Bank.
– Please see the EUROSTAT website for more details.
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What about the Annonymised
Microdata File (AMF)?
• The RMF is anonymised and sent to ISSDA.
• Researchers who do not require micro-data for their
analysis or who could not gain access to the RMF then
apply to ISSDA directly for access to the data.
• Access restrictions for CSO ISSDA data:
– CSO data is available from ISSDA for non-commercial,
social science research only. Requests for any other use of
the data must be directed to the CSO.
– Data requests for consultancy or commercial purposes
should be directed to the CSO.
– Census data (SAPS and COPSAR) is only available from
ISSDA for academic use in Ireland
Central Statistics Office 2012
Freely available facts and figures are essential for
driving improvements in public services. It puts
information, and therefore power, in the hands of
the public and the service providers to challenge or
demand innovation in public services.
Central Statistics Office 2012

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