Text

Report
COMMON CORE STATE
STANDARDS - IMPLEMENTATION
Broward County Public Schools & Just Read, Florida
Agenda
2
Morning
Time
8:00-8:30
Afternoon
Topic
Time
12:00-12:30 Introduction – Stuart Greenberg
8:30-9:30
12:30-1:30
Complex Literary Texts – Katie Moeller
Reading and Writing
9:30-9:45
1:30-1:45
Break
9:45-11:00 1:45-3:00
Marking/Coding Text
Complex Informational Text
– Ruth Gumm
Topics
3
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Why the CCSS Foundational Reading Skills are
Important
Complex Literary Text
Complex Informational Text
Text Marking:
 Supporting
Vocabulary & Reading Comprehension
Foundational Skills
4
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
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Please read the COI document.
Discuss at your table why the
foundational skills in this document are
important to K-2 instruction.
Be prepared to share your thoughts.
The Value of the Foundational Skills
5
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The National Reading Panel (NRP) reviewed 52 studies that
showed that explicit teaching of phonemic awareness to
kindergartners and first-graders helped them in learning to
read.
Explicit and systematic instruction is particularly helpful for
students at risk for reading difficulties.
Children's reading development is dependent on their
understanding of the alphabetic principle – the idea that
letters and letter patterns represent the sounds of spoken
language. Learning that there are predictable relationships
between sounds and letters allows children to apply these
relationships to both familiar and unfamiliar words, and to
begin to read with fluency.
Florida Department of Education - Just Read, Florida!
Effective Phonics Instruction
(Stahl, 2005)
6
 develops
phonological awareness
 develops the alphabetic principle
 provides a thorough grounding in the letters
 need not teach rules, use worksheets, dominate instruction
or be boring
 provides practice reading and writing words in isolation
and connected text
 leads to automatic word recognition (sight words)
 is only one part of a much broader reading program
Florida Department of Education - Just Read, Florida!
Model for English Language Arts
Common Core State Standards
7
Florida Department of Education
Common Core State Standards
Standards – Reading Foundational Skills
8
Print Concepts
Phonological Awareness
Phonics &Word Recognition
Fluency

Common Core State Standards K-2
Reading Foundational Skills
9

These standards are directed toward fostering students’
understanding and working knowledge of concepts of
print, the alphabetic principle, and other basic conventions
of the English writing system. These foundational skills are
not an end in and of themselves; rather, they are
necessary and important components of an effective,
comprehensive reading program designed to develop
proficient readers with the capacity to comprehend texts
across a range of types and disciplines. Instruction should
be differentiated: good readers will need much less
practice with these concepts than struggling readers will.
The point is to teach students what they need to learn and
not what they already know—to discern when particular
children or activities warrant more or less attention.
LITERARY TEXT AND THE
COMMON CORE STATE
STANDARDS
Improving Reading Comprehension
Read-Alouds and the
Reading-Speaking-Listening Link
11
“Students benefit from participating in rich,
structured conversations with an adult in
response to written texts that are read
aloud, orally comparing and contrasting
as well as analyzing and synthesizing.”
Florida Department of Education - Just Read, Florida!
Why read aloud to children using
complex text?
12

Please take a moment at your table to discuss and
jot down in your personal notes:
 Why
are well planned read-alouds part of daily
instruction?
 What
are the research-based effective practices
related to read-alouds?
Florida Department of Education - Just Read, Florida!
Why read-alouds using complex text?
13
Children’s listening comprehension outpaces reading
comprehension until the middle school years; it is important
that kindergarteners build knowledge through being read to
as well as through reading, with the balance gradually
shifting to reading independently. Read-alouds allow
children to experience written language without the burden
of decoding, granting them access to content they may not be
able to read and understand by themselves. They are free to
focus their mental energy on the words and ideas presented
in the text, preparing them to tackle rich written content on
their own later.
Florida Department of Education - Just Read, Florida!
Interactive Literary Discussions during
Read-Alouds
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Discussing concepts of print enhances print awareness
Discussing word use helps students learn new words/vocabulary
Discussion of elements of the story improves comprehension
HIGHER LEVEL LITERACY PRACTICES DURING READ-ALOUDS:
 Analyzing, interpreting and thinking critically about the text
 Focus the discussion on interpretive meaning rather than literal level
comprehension
 Consider reading books aloud at least twice to allow interpretive
meaning making to develop over repeated readings of a text.
Insert slides of The Paper Crane
15
First reading of the text to the audience.
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Interpretive Questions
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The mysterious man in the story says very little, yet he
affects many people, even those he did not see or meet.
How did he do that? [cause/effect]
What did the crane symbolize, or stand for?
Using text evidence, discuss the transformations or
changes that take place in the story. Which one was the
most significant and why do you think that?
Additional possible interpretive questions
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Was there any significance or importance to when
the man came in?
The man had no money to offer, but what did he
have to offer? Was it as important as money? Was
it more important or less important than money?
Based upon the illustrations and the text, what can
be inferred about the value of the gift?
What changes are made?
49
Traditional Read-Alouds
Interpretive Meaning based
Read-Alouds
IRE Pattern:
teacher initiation  student
response  teacher evaluation
Focus of Discussion primarily on literal-level
Interactive Discussion - focus on
Higher level interpretive meaning
Why does Jack go up the beanstalk
a third time after he already has
endless riches?
ie. what were the names of the
characters in Jack and the
Provide evidence from the story to
Beanstalk?
support your answer.
Florida Department of Education - Just Read, Florida!
Interpretive Questions and Factual
Questions
50

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Factual questions have only one correct answer that you can
support with evidence from the text. A factual question asks
you to recall something the author has written and you can
usually answer the question by pointing to one passage in the
selection.
Interpretive questions do not have just one correct answer. For
interpretive questions, correct answers are any answers that
you can support with text evidence. There may be a
preponderance of text evidence across the story to support a
response.
Florida Department of Education - Just Read, Florida!
What is your criteria for selecting text
for read-alouds?
51
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Common Core Text Exemplars
Narrative story structure to support literary discussion
Choose high-quality children’s literature, complex enough to
warrant discussion
Rich, descriptive language
Artful incorporation of text and illustrations that support
interconnecting meaning from text and illustrations
A book length that can be read in its entirety in 20 to 30 minutes,
including discussion
Instructional Routines and Hints for Planning
52
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Preread books before reading with students, so you have some
ideas of points that will support deep discussion. Preplan discussion
prompts.
Focus on truly interpretive points in the text- those that are open to
multiple valid interpretations from differing perspectives.
Redesign read-aloud routines to encourage free student
participation throughout the reading, instead of relying and
enforcing hand raising.
Read texts aloud at least twice to allow interpretive meaning
making to develop.
Instructional Routine
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Read once, then ask questions. Invite students to ask
questions and suggest possible answers. Encourage
students to back up a suggested answer from the
text; students are not to guess.
Read again, and examine significant words.
Consider the range of possible meanings of a
significant word, phrase or group of words.
Use interpretive questions to discuss the meaning of
episodes and interpret the work as a whole.
Florida Department of Education - Just Read, Florida!
The Paper Crane by Molly Bang
54

Please listen as I read the story. Note how the
following teaching behaviors:
 Questions
used – the cognitive demand (write down the
questions I ask the audience)
 Vocabulary
taught (record vocabulary taught)
Florida Department of Education - Just Read, Florida!
Processing the Demonstration of the
Read Aloud
55

With your table rank order the questions I used
during the read-aloud by cognitive demand:
 High
cognitive demand
 Moderate cognitive demand
 Low cognitive demand

What planning was required to be prepared for
this read-aloud? (table discussion/sharing out)
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Now it’s your turn….
56

Take this poem and plan as a table:
 Questions
you would use to develop students’ thinking
 Vocabulary you might teach and how you would teach
it.
Florida Department of Education - Just Read, Florida!
Directions
57
At your table:
 Plan the questions
you would use to
develop students’
thinking
 Select the
vocabulary you
would teach
POEM: By Myself
When I’m by myself
And I close my eyes
I’m a twin
I’m a dimple in a chin
I’m a room full of toys
I’m a squeaky noise
I’m a gospel song
I’m a gong
I’m a leaf turning red
I’m a loaf of brown bread
I’m a whatever I want to be
An anything I care to be
And when I open my eyes
What I care to be
Is me
-Eloise Greenfield
Some possibilities….
58
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Based on the clues in stanza four, what is the best definition of the word dimple?
(words in context)
In this poem, why does the poet say she is a leaf turning red, or a loaf of brown
bread, or a room full of toys?

In the second stanza, she says, “And I close my eyes”…..why does she do that?

Which detail best supports the idea that the poet really likes herself?”


In the following stanza, the author writes, “I’m a room full of toys”,
suggesting…… (a phrase in context)
Why does the writer have herself becoming so many things? (a gong, a leaf
turning red, a loaf of brown bread, a twin….)
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Writing and the Common Core State Standards
Writing: Text types, responding to reading, and
research
60
The Standards acknowledge the fact that whereas some writing skills, such as the
ability to plan, revise, edit, and publish, are applicable to many types of
writing, other skills are more properly defined in terms of specific writing types:
arguments, informative/explanatory texts, and narratives. Standard 9 stresses
the importance of the writing-reading connection by requiring students to draw
upon and write about evidence from literary and informational texts.
Using the Paper Crane as a Reading
and Writing Experience
61
Many folk tales follow a predictable pattern.
common pattern with some variations:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Protagonist at home
Protagonist has problem
Protagonist leaves home to solve problem and
Performs kindness/es for stranger/s
Stranger gives protagonist gift/s
Gift helps solve problem
Protagonist returns home
A
The Fisherman and His Wife by the Brothers
Grimm
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An example of a variation of
this folktale structure.
Writing based upon Reading
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Using the folktale structure, as a table, write a “group” folktale,
recording your tale on a sheet of paper, and be prepared to
share your table’s folktale with another table.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Protagonist at home
Protagonist has problem
Protagonist leaves home to solve problem and
Performs kindness/es for stranger/s
Stranger gives protagonist gift/s
Gift helps solve problem
Protagonist returns home
Building a Writing Community
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
Writers need an audience and a sense of purpose.
By sharing writing with others, children see the
responses their writing generates.
Please get with another table near you and each
table share your folktale by reading it aloud to the
other table.
Florida Department of Education - Just Read, Florida!
Writing by Responding to Complex
Text
65

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
In the fall of the year how might you use this
activity?
In the winter and towards spring how might this
activity change in terms of students gradually
accepting responsibility?
[versus the gradual release of responsibility]
Fostering independence is very important
66
Text Marking to Support Reading Comprehension
Just Read! Florida
INFORMATIONAL TEXT AND
THE COMMON CORE STATE
STANDARDS
Improving Vocabulary & Comprehension
Common Core State Standards
68

Calls for an interdisciplinary approach with a
balance of literature and informational texts in:
 history
 social
studies
 science


Preparation for reading complex informational
texts should begin at the very earliest elementary
school grades.
Domain-specific nonfiction can be infused within the
English language arts block.
Florida Department of Education - Just Read, Florida!
COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS: Reading Informational Texts
Key Ideas and Details
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With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
With prompting and support:



identify the main topic and
retell key details in a text.
With prompting and support, describe the connection in text between two:



individuals
events
ideas or pieces of information
Craft and Structure

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With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
Identify the front cover, back cover, and title page of a book.
Name the author and illustrator of a text and define the role of each in presenting the ideas or information in a
text.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
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With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the text in which they appear
(e.g., what person, place, thing, or idea in the text an illustration depicts).
With prompting and support, identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.
With prompting and support, identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic
(e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding.
COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS: Language
70
Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown & multiple-meaning words
and phrases based on kindergarten reading and content.
a. Identify new meanings from familiar words and apply them accurately
(e.g., knowing duck is a bird and learning the verb to duck.)
b. Use the most frequently occurring inflections and affixes
(e.g., -ed, -s, -re, -un, -pre-, -ful, -less).
5. With guidance and support from adults, explore word relationships and nuances
in word meanings.
a. Sort common objects into categories (e.g., shapes, foods) to gain a sense of
the concepts the categories represent.
d. Distinguish shades of meaning among verbs describing the same general
action (e.g., walk, march, strut, prance) by acting out the meanings.
6. Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading
and being read to, and responding to texts.
Florida Department of Education - Just Read, Florida!
COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS: Writing
71
Text Types and Purposes
2. Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose
informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and
supply some information about the topic.
Research to Build and Present Knowledge
7. Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., explore a number of books by
a favorite author and express opinions about them).
8. With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or
gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
Florida Department of Education - Just Read, Florida!
Teacher Use of Informational Texts
72
Narrative texts have largely
dominated read-alouds in the
primary classroom.
Mixed Genre
13%
Expository
4%
(Duke, 2000)
In the past, when teachers read aloud
& interpreted difficult nonfiction,
young readers learned information
but failed to read expository text.
(Palmer & Stewart, 2003)
Teachers need to directly instruct how
to navigate & extract information in
order to become fluent & strategic
readers of this genre.
(RAND, 2002)
Narrative
82%
Pentimonti et al, 2010
The Water Hole by Eric Carle
73
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
Mixed genre text
The way a teacher uses it in read-aloud
will determine benefits from its use:



Focus on literary elements: entertainment
Focus on informational elements: content knowledge
A read-aloud can increase learning benefits by:



emphasizing the book’s informational elements
pairing it with another informational text (i.e., Animal Dictionary)
rereading, each time with a more precise focus:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Specific name of animal (i.e., panda bear, toucan, etc.)
Specific type of animal (i.e., mammal, bird, etc.)
Animal comparisons (i.e., animals with horns, pouches, etc.)
Animal habitats (i.e., mountains, jungle, etc.)
ACTIVITY: Using Informational Texts
74
How do I use informational text in my classroom?
With a partner, discuss the following:

What percentage of read-alouds in my classroom are:
READ-ALOUD TEXTS IN MY CLASSROOM
Literary/Narrative Text
Informational/Expository Text
The Water Hole by Graeme Base
The Paper Crane by Molly Bang
The Water Hole by Graeme Base
Monarch Butterfly by Gail Gibbons

How do I currently use informational texts?

Where could I locate more informational texts?
Informational Text:
The Benefits Align with Elements of Text Complexity
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Expands student development of:
• more sophisticated oral language
Elements of
Text Complexity
(Reese & Harris, 1997; Smolkin et al, 2008)
•content area knowledge in
science and social studies
Text Structure
Levels of Meaning
(Stone & Twardosz, 2001; Hirsch, 2003)
•expository text structures
(Duke & Kays, 1998; Donovan & Smolkin, 2001)
•reading interest in various topics
(Duke 2000; Casteel & Isom, 1994)
Language
Knowledge
Demands
Selecting Informational Texts
76
Criteria for Selecting Informational Texts for Primary Classrooms
Cover
Does the cover showcase and accurately represent content information inside the book?

Content/Topic
Illustrations
Organization
Font size/type
Does this text & its potential use align with and meet one or more of the Common
Core State Standard(s)? Which standard(s) does it target?
 Does the text relate to a topic that is a focus in one or more of the subject areas? (i.e.,
reading, science, social studies, etc.) Which content, topic, and subject area?
 Does this text share a theme with another informational text for use as paired/series
text?
 Does the writer share:
- accurate, reliable, and current facts?
- intriguing information?
- references or research sources?
Do the illustrations:
 include accurate and sufficient labels or captions?
 explain and/or enhance the content?
Are the sections, headings, sub-headings, and illustrations:
 well-organized and clearly distinct from one another?
 well-designed with table of contents, index, or glossary?
Are the letters/font large and simple enough for students to clearly see?
ACTIVITY: Instruction in the Fall
77
Text: From Seed to Pumpkin
Author: Wendy Pfeffer
Materials for Activity:
Handout pages 2, 3, & 4



With a partner, identify specific Common Core Standard(s) that
correspond with instructional tasks for reading, language, and
writing.
On the timeline, place specific instructional routines in sequence.
(See three of the instructional routines on the following page – p 4.)
Discuss how instruction for this lesson facilitates the performance
task for this text.
From Seed to Pumpkin is a Kindergarten exemplar of complex informational text located in Appendix B of the
Common Core State Standards (CCSS).
From Seed to Pumpkin
78
PICTURE SORT ROUTINE
Parts of a Pumpkin
Basic Needs of a Pumpkin
Florida Department of Education - Just Read, Florida!
From Seed to Pumpkin
79
MAIN IDEA ROUTINE
(Using approximately 10 words or less)
Pumpkins need sunlight, water, and air to grow from a seed.
Florida Department of Education - Just Read, Florida!
From Seed to Pumpkin
80
Routine for Retelling and Writing
The farmer plants
the seeds.
•Seeds
A stem shoots up
from the ground and
becomes a seedling.
Leaves grow bigger by
turning sunlight into
food energy and
mixing air with water.
The plant grows bigger
every day by soaking
up water from the soil.
•Seedling
•Plant
•Leaves
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ACTIVITY: Instruction in the Spring
81
Text: How a Seed Grows
Author: Helene Jordan
BACKGROUND INFORMATION
• From the Let’s-Read-And-Find-Out Science Series
(same series as From Seed to Pumpkin)
• About the processes of planting and growing seeds so the teacher:
• briefly demonstrates during read aloud for students to observe
differences in seed growth across days.
• relates to the book in different ways over several lessons.
• can use both books in a lesson as paired texts
(How a Seed Grows and From Seed to Pumpkin)
INSTRUCTION: Main Idea & Summarizing
82
Sprouts
Lesson 4:
Bean seeds grow sprouts
a little bit everyday.
Roots
Lesson 3:
Lesson 1:
Bean seeds grow roots
a little bit everyday.
Different seeds grow in
different ways.
Seeds
Lesson 5: Summary Statement
Lesson 2:
Planting requires seeds, a
container, soil, water, and
sunlight.
Planting
Lesson 5: Summary Statement
The book How a Seed Grows is about how different seeds grow in different ways, how to plant
bean seeds, and how watch their roots and sprouts grow a little bit every day.
The book From Seed to Pumpkin
describes how pumpkins seeds grow
and what they need in order to grow
into pumpkin plants.
ACTIVITY: Instruction in the Spring
83
Text: How a Seed Grows
Author: Helene Jordan
Materials for Activity:
Handout pages 5 & 6


With a partner, identify specific Common Core Standard(s)
that correspond with instructional tasks for reading, language,
and writing.
Determine which routines in lessons 1-5 facilitate student
understanding in:





Text structure
Basic comprehension
Vocabulary development
Content-area concepts
Complex thinking
84
Florida Department of Education - Just Read, Florida!
Teacher-Directed Instruction
85
EXAMPLE OF TEACHER-DIRECTED INSTRUCTION USING INFORMATIONAL TEXT
Instructional Focus
& Process
Text Segment from
Monarch Butterfly
Teacher Comments
VOCABULARY OF INFORMATIONAL TEXT:
The teacher focuses on meanings of general academic & discipline-specific vocabulary.
After reading the text segment, the teacher
The teacher rereads text aloud In a few days the egg hatches. points to text and says: This word larva is one we
& briefly stops at strategic
Out crawls a small caterpillar, haven’t heard before. Let’s say the word larva together:
places in text using:
also called a larva.
“larva.” Larva is one of the growing stages of the caterpillar.
 choral response
(Teacher holds up large picture of caterpillar)
 pictures to illustrate
First, the caterpillar hatches from the egg (teacher uses
 pantomime (perhaps with
plastic egg to animate hatching action), then it
objects) to animate action
becomes larva. Everyone, what happens to the egg? “It
 graphic organizers to
hatches.” What does it hatch into? “Larva.” (Teacher
show relationships
records words on graphic organizer next to
 repetitive use of new word
picture of caterpillar, then points to words for
students to say them with her again)
Florida Department of Education - Just Read, Florida!
EXAMPLE OF TEACHER-DIRECTED INSTRUCTION USING INFORMATIONAL TEXT
Instructional Focus
& Process
Text Segment from
Monarch Butterfly
Teacher Comments
86
USING INFORMATIONAL TEXT: The teacher models various aspects of close reading during rereading.
The teacher models thinking In a few days the egg hatches. Out Between text segments, the teacher models questioning,
skills and processes:
crawls a small caterpillar, also
comprehension monitoring, & metacognitive awareness
 Text-marking with
called a larva. . . .
using text-marking technique by placing large yellow
variety of manipulatives First, the caterpillar eats the
transparent sticky flags over the target words: Now that I
(i.e., post-it notes, sticky eggshell and then chews away at
know that larva is a growth stage of the caterpillar, I want to keep
flags)
the milkweed leaf. The egg of a
reading to find out the answer this question:
 Pre-recorded questions
monarch is almost always laid on a What does a caterpillar do in the larva stage?
for display
milkweed plant. The plant will be
its food.
The teacher models how to
extract and use text
information.
. . . The skin falls off. A new,
strange form appears! It is called
the chrysalis or pupa. The
chrysalis is like a blanket that is
wrapped around the body growing
inside.
After reading the text segment, the teacher says: Pupa is
the caterpillar’s next stage of growth. I know that because of these
words on this page (Teacher points to & rereads segment): “A
new, strange form appears.” (Teacher traces shape of pupa on
the page’s picture) This has 2 names, and it says what the names
are right here (points to text): “chrysalis or pupa.” And, these
words on the next line tell me what a pupa looks like (points to text):
“a blanket that is wrapped around the body growing inside.” See, this
picture shows the caterpillar’s skin wrapping around it like a blanket.
(Teacher records words on graphic organizer next to
picture of caterpillar forming a pupa, then points to
words for students to say them with her.)
Organizing & Using Extracted Text Information
87
6. Butterfly dries wings
5. Butterfly pulls out of pupa
1. Butterfly lays egg
Life Cycles of the
Monarch Butterfly
2. Egg hatches and becomes
caterpillar
(larva)
4. Caterpillar forms a pupa
3. Caterpillar molting
Florida Department of Education - Just Read, Florida!
EXAMPLE OF TEACHER-DIRECTED INSTRUCTION USING INFORMATIONAL TEXT
Instructional Focus &
Process
88
Text Segment from
Monarch Butterfly
Teacher Comments
NAVIGATING INFORMATIONAL TEXT: The teacher points out to students the purpose & use of organizational
elements of text.
The teacher models how to
navigate the following
organizational elements of
informational text:
1.
2.
3.
text features (headings,
diagrams)
2.
text structure or
organization (sequence,
compare/contrast, etc.)
text resources in the
book ( table of
contents, glossary, etc.)
When the butterfly lays the egg . 2.
. . In a few days the egg
hatches… First, the caterpillar
eats the eggshell… It breaks out
of its old skin (molting)… For
two weeks the caterpillar eats. It
molts about five times. Finally,
it is a full grown monarch
caterpillar…It attaches itself to
the stem and drops down head
first… A new, strange form
appears! It is called chrysalis …
Before reviewing text segments, the teacher
says: Let’s look at this large chart that we made during
our last rereading. (Teacher refers to each step on
the chart, one by one, turning to the
corresponding page in text to point out
sequence of stages in life cycle). All of this shows
the stages from the egg. This helps us understand what
this book is all about. All of the growing stages in the life
of a monarch butterfly.
Organizing & Using Extracted Text Information
89
What creatures
eat butterflies?
6. Butterfly dries wings
5. Butterfly pulls out of pupa
1. Butterfly lays egg
What happens
inside the pupa
to make it
shrink, harden,
and turn into a
butterfly?
Life Cycles of the
Monarch Butterfly
How many eggs
do monarch
butterflies lay?
2. Egg hatches and becomes
caterpillar
(larva)
4. Caterpillar forms a pupa
3. Caterpillar molting
Why do caterpillars molt?
How many days
does it take for an
egg to hatch into a
caterpillar?
90
Florida Department of Education - Just Read, Florida!
Classroom Diagrams
91
Diagrams can be used in class:
• interactive word wall
• discussions
• picture glossaries
• picture summaries
How can feelers help
a butterfly touch and
smell?
scales
How wide are
the wings?
proboscis
thorax
Diagrams can become a
Question Generation Board
abdomen
What kind of flower juice
does the monarch eat with
its proboscis?
Student Diagrams
92
Diagrams can become part of student work:
• picture glossaries
• summaries
• writing
• question generation
• research projects
Paired Text Lesson
93

Text 1: Face to Face with Caterpillars
by Darlyne Murawski

Text 2: Monarch Butterfly
by Gail Gibbons
Students compare & contrast information across texts:
 Research different types of caterpillars
 Learn & use more specific terminology (i.e., cocoon,
etc.) since the Winter of the year
 Draw and write information about the activities of
various caterpillars (i.e., contrast how larva is different
for various insects).
Unanswered Questions?
94
[email protected][email protected][email protected]
CALL:
850-245-9529
Florida Department of Education - Just Read, Florida Office

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