MICE Industry

Report
EDUCATE
DEBATE
CELEBRATE
FUND
RAISING
NEGOTIATE
MOTIVATE
INITIATE
2/49
Meetings
Convention
Exhibitions
Special
Events
Incentive
travel
Corporate
hospitality
… but two or
more of these
elements can be
combined in a
single event:
concentives !
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DEMAND FOR MICE
The demand for MICE is very varied in terms of:
- sizes
- length
- purpose
But the objective is usually:
To educate, To Motivate
To provide opportunity for networking
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Corporate Demand
Dominates in
terms of numbers
of meetings
Internal and
external meetings:
product launch
External meetings:
shareholder
meetings
WHY hold
meetings outside
company offices ?
Internal meetings:
Training, strategy
meetings
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ASSOCIATION DEMAND
(societies, clubs, federations ….)
Professional / trade
associations
Local / regional /
national /
international
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Government
Trade unions
Hobbies
Religious
The
S.M.E.R.F.
market:
Social, Military,
Educational,
Religious, Fraternal
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ECONOMIC
IMPACTS
SOCIAL /
CULTURAL
IMPACTS
ENVIRONME
NTAL
IMPACTS
KNOWLEDGE
TRANSFER
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Use of the
Internet:
Radio Frequency
Identification
For site selection
Wireless
everywhere: free
Wi-Fi
For destination
and venue
promotion
For enhancing the
conference
experience
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ADVANTAGES
Space for large events
DISADVANTAG
ES
Technology
Expertise
Room for exhibitions
Growing
number of
smaller events
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ADVANTAGES
Everything under one roof
DISADVANTAGE
S
Mixing business and leisure
guests
Can appear too luxurious
All-inclusive quotes
Airport hotels: timesaving
Unsuitable for very large
events
Lack of flexibility
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ADVANTAGES
Good value-for-money
DISADVANTAGES
Learning ambience
Lack of comfort and
facilities
Everything on site
Ancient/modern
Range of sizes of meetings
rooms
Limited to vacation
periods
Large sites: problems of
orientation
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ADVANTAGES
DISADVANTAGES
Businesslike ambiance
Few distractions: more
focussed
No grading scheme
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ADVANTAGES
DISADVANTAGES
Memorable
Restrictions due to primary
function
Novelty value
Cruise ships: all-in-one price
Unlikely to be used several
times by the same client
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Professional
conference
organisers
Help in
defining
objectives
Advice on
taxation
liabilities
Sponsorship
Registration
processing
systems
Meetings
with
organising
committees
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Venue Finding Agencies
Help in identifying suitable venues
Shortlist
Work on commission
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

Destination Management Companies
“A professional services company,
possessing extensive local knowledge,
expertise and resources, specialising in the
design and implementation of events,
activities, tours, transportation and
programme logistics”
Association of Destination Management Executives (ADME)
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Creative proposals
for special events
within the meeting
Guest tours, preand post-conference
tours
VIP amenities and
transportation
Shuttle services
Meet and greet
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Conference
production
companies
For highprofile or
technicallyelaborate
events
Build the
conference
set
AV support
and special
effects
Writing
scripts and
training
speakers
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20/49
Intermediaries
working on behalf of
suppliers
Exist at different
geographical levels:
local, regional,
national …
Partnerships between
public sector and
private sector, and
funded by both
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Public sector
contributions
(taxation)
Private sector
membership
fees:
The CVB must
be able to
demonstrate to
its members a
significant
return on
investment
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Marketing activities, to raise the profile of
the destination
Services for conference planners who
choose the destination as the location for
their event
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Advertising in
the trade press
Organising
familiarisation
trips and press
trips
Running
ambassador
programmes
Producing
promotional
videos, CDROMs,
brochures,
leaflets …
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Running direct
marketing
campaigns
(direct mail)
Dealing with
media
enquiries
Public
relations
25/49
A ‘one-stop shop’
for the destination
Coordination of
services (with
DMC)
Impartial advice
and assistance
(but…)
Accommodation
booking for
delegates
Bid documents
Venue selection
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Provision of
‘welcome services’ at
major points of entry
Promotiona
l and PR
support to
maximise
delegate
numbers
Provision
of tourist
information
Civic
welcome/reception
27/49
Effective financial
planning is key to a
successful
conference
A conference
planner must be
able to:
Prepare and work to
financial budgets
Operate control
systems to ensure
the viability of a
congress
Maximise revenue
and minimise cost.
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Establish areas for
potential
expenditure and
sources of income
There should be
no surprises!
Create a
monitoring
framework
Budgetary
constraints
should be shared
Set a control
mechanism to
maximise
revenue and
minimise cost
Client or planner
can set and control
the budget
29/49
Factors influencing the budget:
Size and scope of the congress
History
Location
Dates
Programme content and structure
Food and beverage
Audio visual requirements
Social programme.
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Key
budgetin
g skills
Ability to use
experience or
intelligent
‘guesstimates’
to project
costs
Ability to
secure
competitive
costs from
suppliers
Ability to
conceive the
‘Big Picture’ to
project
contingency
allowances.
31/49
Core
elements
of the
budget
1.Fixed
costs =
things that
the
congress
has to
have
2.Variable
costs = per
person
cost
3.Revenue
: from
various
sources
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A TYPICAL CONVENTION FOLLOWS A FORMAT LIKE THIS:Welcome/Registration.
Introduction of president.
President’s welcome speech, opening the convention.
First keynote address by a featured speaker
Exposition booths open.
Several workshops or presentations on specific topics.
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Demonstrations of special topics
 Vendor’s private receptions
 Dinner
 Convention centre closes
Convention services for incoming tourist
 Transportation
 Hotels & Motels
 Restaurants
 Attractions
 Suppliers & etc….

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ORGANISE AN EXHIBITION

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Space requirement
Proposal
Bookings
EXHIBITION PROCESS
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Feasibility phase
Preliminary design
phase
Detail design phase
Production planning
phase
Production phase
Operational phase
Termination phase
Assessment phase
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Incentive travel refers to the segment of business travel that uses
the allure of a trip as an incentive or reward for achievement.
A
Typical example of incentive travel would be a company-paid
vacation to a resort for top-performing salespersons.
Sometimes this type of vacation will include motivational seminars,
morale-building activities, and other activities that build upon a
gathering of employees.
Incentive trips also can include business-related group activities,
such as the introduction of new products or promotional campaigns,
or training programs for employees.
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Service level
• Safety & security
• Accommodation cost
• Scenic beauty
• Varieties of activities for all tastes
• Sightseeing & cultural attractions
• Modern technical system
• Sport & recreational facilities
• Unusual destination
• Climate
• Public transport
• Duration of flight
•
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TOURISM
INDUSTRY
ANCILLARY
SERVICES
ACCESSIBILITY
MICE
ACCOMOD
ATION
ATTRACTIONS
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CONSUMER OR TOURIST
TRANSPORTATION
TRANSPORTATION
MICE VENUE
AIRLINES
SIGHTSEEING OR
ENTERTAINMENT AT
DESTINATION
DESTINATION
TRANSPORTATION
TRANSPORTATION OR
AIRPORT TRNSFERS
TRANSFERS TO
AIRLINES
HOTEL OR
ACCOMODATION
TOURIST HOME
PLACE
39/49
CONTACT WITH MICE
CUSTOMER
TRANSPORT FOR
SIGHTSEEING
ARRANGING FLIGHT
TICKETS
TRANSFERS
ARRRANGING VISA
ARRANGING MICE
VENUE
ACCOMODATION
TRAVEL INSURANCE
FOREX
AND OTHER
AUXILARIES ACTIVITES
LOCAL TRANSPORT
ESCORT SERVICES
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Cost:
the monetary expense of transportation
and access.
 Time: the duration/distance of travel involved
and the opportunity cost of that time.
Frequency: the frequency of connections to the
site.
 Convenience: the scheduling convenience of
the connections.
 Barriers: the extent of any travel formalities,
which inhibit travel such as visas, customs, etc.
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Local
authority: the extent of assistance and
backing offered by the local authorities

CVB/Convention Centre: the extent of planning,
logistical and promotional support offered.

Subsidies: the extent to which the destination
offers to pay for costs through rebates and
subsidies.
42/49
Entertainment:
Restaurants, Bars, Theatres, Nightclubs
etc.
 Shopping: Malls, Major Department Stores, Low
Prices etc.
 Sightseeing: Architecture, Museums, Monuments,
Attractions, Parks, Historical Sites, Local Tours.
 Recreation: Sports And Activities Either As Spectator
Or Participant.
 Professional opportunities: Visiting Local Clients,
Negotiations, Business Deals, Selling, Making
Contacts etc.
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Capacity:
The number of rooms available and
whether more than a single hotel is required.
 Cost: The cost of suitable accommodation at the
site.
 Service: The perception of standards of service.
 Security: The extent to which the hotels provide
safe and secure environment.
 Availability: Are the facilities available when
required?
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Capacity:
Ability of site to provide suitable sized facilities.
 Layout: suitability of facility layout and floor plan.
 Cost: the cost of the meeting space required.
 Ambience: the ability of the facility to create an
appropriate atmosphere and environment.
 Service: the perception of the standards of service.
 Security: the extent to which the facility provides a safe
and secure meeting space.
 Availability: are the facilities available when required.
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Experience: has the site performed satisfactorily in the past.
Reputation: what is the reputation of the destination among
other meeting planners.
Marketing: the effectiveness of the destination’s marketing
activities.
Site Environment
Climate: the desirability of the destination’s climate.
Setting: the attractiveness of the destinations surroundings.
Infrastructure: the suitability and standard of local
infrastructure.
Hospitality: the extent to which the host organizations and community
excel in welcoming visitors.
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Risks:
the possibility of strikes, natural
disasters, boycotts, and other possible adverse
events.
 Profitability: the extent to which the site
would produce a profit for the organizers.
 Novelty: the extent to which the destination
represents a novel location
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Singapore
Shanghai
Kualalumpur
Bangkok
Honkong
Seoul (Korea)
Vienna (Austria)
Guangzhou(China)
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Frankfurt
,Dusseldorf,
Hamburg
(Germany)
Paris (France)
Barcelona (Spain)
Geneva
(Switzerland)
Stockholm
(Sweden)
Jakarta
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