Division of Special Education Presentation

Report
Preparing Students for this Third
Millennium!
Division of Special Education
Region Assistant Principal’s Meeting Fall 2010
Will Gordillo, District Director
Course
Code
Directory,
HQ,
Scheduling
IDEA
ARRA
FUNDS
IEP/504
SP&P/
LEA
Guide
IDEA ARRA FUNDS April 2009 –
September 30, 2010
Vendor
IDEA ARRA Purchases to Support Instruction for
SWD
Name of Item
Target Students
Subject Area
News 2 You
Unique Learning Systems
Learning Today
Smart Tutor
Reading
Math
Science
Social Studies
Reading and Math
(Intervention/support)
Learning Today
Mango Mon
SRA
Number Worlds
Oakwood Solutions
(Conover Company)
MECA
(Microcomputer Evaluation
of Careers and Academics)
Project DISCOVERY
K-12
Modified Curriculum
Independent, Supported and
Participatory functioning levels
K-5
Standard and Modified Curriculum
Independent functioning level
6-12
Modified Curriculum
Independent and Supported
functioning level
K-5
Modified Curriculum
All students with disabilities in all
middle schools and high schools.
All functioning levels.
Students participating in Project
VICTORY Career Labs in Middle
Schools
All high school aged students served
by 9731 including Project VICTORY
All high school aged SWD
(Used by Transition Specialists and
9731 Teachers
Transition skills assessment
Destination Knowledge
Council for Exceptional
Children
Curriculum Associates
LCCE
(Life Centered Career
Exploration)
Brigance Transition
Assessment
Reading and Math
(Intervention/support)
Math
(This is the core program)
Transition
(Career portfolio, career assessments, and
career experience activities)
Career experience lab activities
Career experience classroom curriculum
IDEA ARRA Purchases to Support Instruction for SWD
Vendor
Provenio Group – LEAPS
Name of Item
LEAPS Computer Software
Target Students
120 K-12 Schools
E/BD, InD, and ASD students
60 Elementary SLD/OHI
students
All SPED, GIFTED, 504,
B-2 and Pre K CWD, Medicaid
Recovery
Subject Area
Social Skills Curriculum for E/BD, InD,
ASD, and PBS schools
Language Arts and Reading
Imagine Learning
Imagine Learning
Software
SPED EMS
All Grades
All Content Areas
All Grades Hospital Homebound
Itinerant and Teleclass Students
All Grades Hospital Teleclass
and Itinerant Hospital
Homebound Teachers
All Content Areas
Lenovo
Recording for the Blind and
Dyslexic
230 Student Netbooks and
related accessories
35 Teacher Laptops
Sprint
Sprint Air Cards
Access for Hospital Homebound
Students and Staff
All Content Areas
Smart Technologies
Bridgit Software Presentation
Program
Online Courses
Hospital Homebound Teleclass
Students
Hospital Homebound Teleclass
Students
Selected Content Areas
New Program Development Autism Academies at Blue
Lakes, Gratigny and Redondo
Elementary Schools
Students with Autism Spectrum
Disorder
Classroom materials ,equipment and
supplies, assistive technology and
instructional technology (e.g. Tangos,
Smart Tables ,Smart Boards)
Public Consulting Group
Recording for the Blind and
Dyslexic
Lenovo
Kaplan Virtual Education
Various
NA – Data warehouse and web-based
document development system.
All Content Areas
Selected Content Areas
SPED EMS
Major Accomplishments
•
Launched successful rollout of SPED-EMS (IEP, Gifted, and 504) in March 2010
– Trained 3,715 staff (ESE Staff: 3,206 Gifted
Staff: 509)
• 8,428 users have logged into SPED EMS more than
once
– 15,382 IEPs have been created
– 8,600 EPs have been created
– 200 504s have been created
•
Utilized EasyFAX to electronically store all signed forms
– 25,000 faxes received
•
•
Completed Eligibility process (Initial Eligibility, Reevaluation and FAPE tabs)
Developed IEP and Matrix of Services integration and validation
Message Board Update
Hired new message board assistance employees
Message Board Statistics: (11/3/2010 – 11/7/2010)
oTotal number of messages:
286
oNumber of responses:
PCG:
40
M-DCPS:
246
Carmen:
11
Emely:
28
Harris:
207
oAvg. response time:
667 minutes (11.08 hours)
oFrequent Message Topics:
oEligibility:
13
ESOL:
oMatrix:
6
Reevaluation:
oContacts:
9
Gifted:
oDeletion requests:
68
Access Issue:
oEasyFax:
73
Interim IEP:
11
2
8
16
4
IEP Statistics
Number of IEP’s created for the week of 10/31/10-11/07/10
734
Number if IEP’s created 4/2/10-11/07/10
15,382
Number of Interim IEP’s created 4/2/10-11/07/10
1,692
Total Number of Students with IEP or Interim IEP to date
14,886
Next Steps
•
Implement logging of consultation/collaboration services
•
Pilot of new Matrix of Services tab during October - December and roll
out to all schools soon after
•
Define and develop necessary standard reports for
administrators/district staff
•
Roll-out Advanced Reporting system
•
RTI/ED Plan
IEP
 Completed development of additional documents
 Notice of Proposal/Refusal/FAPE
 Reevaluation Team Document
 Manifestation Determination
 Interim IEP
 IEP at-a-glance
 Progress Report
 Restraint/Seclusion
 Completed development of FAPE and Reevaluation tabs to complete Eligibility
Process
 Developed IEP and Matrix of Services integration
 Completed final walk-through of IEP process and document for sign-off
504 and Gifted
 Rolled-out and trained staff on 504 Process
 Received sign-off on the 504 Process and documents
 Rolled-out EP Process and EP Progress Reports
 Completed final walk-through of EP Process and documents for
sign-off
Alignment of Support
• SPED EMS School Facilitator per school site, assigned by
the school principal
• Tier 1 support for teachers
– Teachers will contact School Facilitator via email when
experiencing difficulties utilizing the SPED EMS
application.
– Difficulties/problems will fall into two categories:
compliance and/or technical.
• Any compliance problems will be routed by the School
Facilitator to the District office or SPED-EMS Message Board.
• Message Board staffed by MDCPS and PCG
• Staff is kept abreast of changes in the system
through the SPED-EMS Updates in the Main
Menu of the application.
Training
• Training has been scheduled through FDLRS
– Writing compliant IEPs and Matrix of Services using SPED-EMS:
Elementary;
– Writing compliant IEPs and Matrix of Services using SPED-EMS:
Secondary;
– Writing PLEP & Goals using SPED-EMS: Elementary;
– Writing PLEP & Goals using SPED-EMS: Secondary;
– Writing compliant EPs using SPED-EMS: Gifted
• Training is also taking place at various schools by the staffing
specialists, program specialists and district ESE staff.
• Workshops will be offered to provide new users with a
refresher on how to navigate the system.
• Training will also be provided to SPED Clerks and registrars
who assist in the completion of SPED documents.
Professional Development
Schedule
• Writing Compliant IEP/Matrix 11/15/10 (2 days)
FDLRS-NORTH
•
• Writing Compliant IEP/Matrix 11/18/10 (2 days)
FDLRS-SOUTH
•
• Writing PLEP & Goals 12/02/10 FDLRS-NORTH
SPED-Electronic Management
System (EMS) Implementation
• M-DCPS has transitioned from the WISE to a
new automated system, SPED-EMS.
• All IEPs, EPs, Notification of Meetings and 504
documents must be developed using SPEDEMS.
• No documents can be completed in WISE or
Forms Management.
SPED-Electronic Management
System (EMS) Implementation
• Access to the WISE system has been
eliminated. Records from WISE have been
uploaded to EMS.
• Enter data in ISIS until further notice.
• SPED Clerks will be provided access to the IEPEMS application
HQ -Scheduling Methods/Service
Delivery Models for Students with
Disabilities
To Review
Highly Qualified
• Has been required since July 1, 2006, for
Florida K-12 teachers of core academic
subjects
• ESE teachers for grades K-6 must meet
HQT requirements for elementary education
• ESE teachers for grades 7-12 must meet
HQT for core academic subject, unless level
of instruction is at the elementary (K-6)
18
level, then HQT in elementary applies
To Review – Core Academic
Subjects Include
 English
 Reading or Language
Arts
 Math
 Civics and Government
(political science)
 Economics
 The Arts (art, music,
drama)
 Science
 History
 Foreign Language
 Geography
19
To Review
• Level of instruction is based on level of
instruction of the content being taught
• Level of instruction is not based on the
reading or math level of the student
20
#1 – Basic Education Course
Scheduling
Method/Delivery
Model
Certification
HQT
Basic education
teacher is providing
instruction
YES - In accordance
with basic education
course number
Yes - for basic core
academic subjects
ESE teacher is
providing
consultation in
accordance with
student’s IEP
YES – in any ESE
area
[refer to note for
exception –
students with
sensory
impairments]
Not required
21
#1 – Basic Education Course
Additional Information
 If consultation is being provided to address the student’s
sensory impairment, ESE teacher must have appropriate
certification for that disability
 Consultation services may be provided via face-to-face or
via conference call or virtual technologies
 EXCEPTION – if consultation is claimed on the Matrix of
Service document, must be face-to-face
22
#2 – Basic Education Course
Scheduling Method
Certification
Two teachers providing
instruction via coteaching; both are
responsible for
planning, delivering,
and evaluating
instruction for all
students for entire
class period
Yes – both teachers in
accordance with basic
education course
number
HQT
Yes – both teachers
must meet HQT for
basic core academic
subject taught
If one co-teacher is
also providing specially
designed instruction in
accordance with IEP,
must meet ESE
certification
requirements.
23
#3 – Basic Education Course
Scheduling Method
Certification
HQT
Basic education
teacher is teaching
basic ed course
content
Yes – in accordance
with basic education
course number
YES – for basic core
academic subject
taught
ESE teacher is
providing “in-class oneon-one” [AKA “support
facilitation” or “inclusion
teaching”]
YES – for any ESE
area
[refer to note for
exception- students
with sensory
impairments]
Not required
24
#4 – Basic Education Course
Scheduling Method
One teacher serves as
both the basic
education teacher and
the ESE teacher
providing the speciallydesigned instruction on
IEP
Certification
Yes - In accordance
with basic education
course number
HQT
Yes - for basic core
academic subject
taught
AND
ESE certification
25
#4 – Basic Education Course
Additional Information
• At the IEP meeting, teacher may sign as the
general education teacher and the special
education teacher of the student
• All participant requirements for IEP meeting
apply
26
#5 – Basic Ed and ESE
Courses
Scheduling Method
Certification
HQT
Basic education
Yes – in accordance
Yes - for basic core
teacher is providing
with basic education
academic subject
instruction for both the course number
taught
basic and ESE courses
Teacher not out-of -field
for the ESE course
number
ESE teacher provides
services via “in class
one-on-one”
Yes – in any ESE area
[refer to note for
exception – students
with sensory
impairments]
Not required
27
#6 – Basic Ed and ESE Courses
Scheduling Method
One teacher serves as
both the basic
education teacher and
the ESE teacher
Certification
Yes in accordance
with the basic
education course
number
AND
Yes in accordance with
the applicable ESE
course number
HQT
Yes – for basic core
academic subject
taught
Level of instruction,
not grade level of the
student, determines
HQT requirements
28
#7 – ESE Course
Scheduling Method
ESE teacher providing
instruction
Certification
Yes – in accordance
with applicable ESE
course number
HQT
Yes for basic core
academic subject
Level of instruction,
not grade level of the
student, determines
HQT requirements
29
THE
LEA
LOCAL EDUCATION AGENCY (LEA)
ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
• Responsible for making decisions on behalf of the
school
• Ensures that the IEP meets compliance with State and
Federal regulations
• Knowledgeable as it relates to resources available
within the school / school district
• Ensures that the program and services specified on
the IEP will be provided within timeframes delineated
Who’s Your LEA?
• Avoid the audit bug bite.
• Designate the appropriate person(s)
responsible for this important role at your
school in accordance with guidelines.
• Ensure that they attend all appropriate
professional development offered
throughout the year.
• Monitor what they do.
• Remember who is ultimately responsible.
THE SCHOOL ASSIGNED LEA
 Conduct and annual / interim IEP meeting
 Complete the Matrix of Services Form following the
annual / interim IEP meeting
 Finalize Matrix on SPED EMS
 Know and understand The Exceptional Student
Education Policies and Procedures Manual (SP&P)








Procedural Safeguards
Parental Revocation
Transfer of Rights
Medicaid
IEP
Discipline/ Manifestation Determination
District / State Assessment
McKay Scholarships
EXCEPTIONAL STUDENT EDUCATION (ESE)
POLICIES AND PROCEDURES (SP&P) DOCUMENT
SCHOOL DISTRICT POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
• Any district-produced policy and procedures documents that
meet the following criteria have been submitted to the Florida
Department of Education with the SP&P.
• Supplement the information contained in the district's SP&P
• Address school district exceptional student education procedures
or policies
• Are adopted by the school board as school district policy
The SP&P contains the districts policies and procedures
and is adopted by the School Board
LEA IMPLEMENTATION GUIDE
GUIDELINES FOR:
• Role and Responsibilities of an LEA when Conducting
IEP Meetings
• Completing Informed Notice of Proposal or Refusal to
Change Evaluation, Identification, Educational
Placement or Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE)
• Revocation of Consent for Special Education Services
• Self-Assessment of Student Record Folder
FLDOE SELF-ASSESSMENT
PROCESSES AND PROCEDURES
• Beginning with 2007-2008, the FLDOE revised the
SPED program monitoring process to be conducted
annually as a self-assessment.
• Self-Assessment – process whereby a district
undertakes the review of critical components of the ESE
programs
• Findings of Noncompliance - Written notice that a
regulation has been violated and a description of the
quantitative or qualitative data supporting the decision
FLDOE SELF-ASSESSMENT
PROCESSES AND PROCEDURES
• Timely Correction – Verification that correction has occurred within
the timeline of 60 days
• Individual Student Correction

Correction possible - Reconvene the IEP Team

Not correctable – address to ensure future compliance
• Systemic Correction

Noncompliance that is evident in > 25 percent of records

A Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is a problem solving process
and requires submission of evidence of correction within one year
FLDOE On-site Monitoring Followup Corrective Action
1. As required by the 2009-2010 FLDOE On-site Monitoring Audit for
Special Education, corrective action in the form of technical
assistance, must be provided to the targeted school
administrators for areas of non-compliance addressing
suspension and manifestation determination requirements.
Compliance team representatives from the Division of Special
Education will follow up with the administrator in charge of
Special Education and the LEA/Program Specialist at the schools
to
provide
technical
assistance
in
these
areas
requiring corrective action.
2. Any questions or concerns, please contact Ms. Edna Waxman,
Instructional Supervisor, Special Education Compliance, at 305995-2766 or via email at [email protected], or the
Division of Special Education at 305-995-2027.
2009-2010 Corrective Action Plan - Miami-Dade
On-site Monitoring SPP Indicator 4
Corrective Action: Within 10 school days of any decision to change the placement
of a student with a disability because of a violation of a code of student conduct,
the district conducted a manifestation determination.
Actions Taken:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Summer Institute: Special Education Compliance Professional Development for Administrators compiled
6/29/2010 - 7/8/2010
The district conducted six separate full-day professional development sessions for administrators on
June 29,30,July 1, 6, 7 and 8 emphasizing the areas of non-compliance findings by the FLDOE. 244
school-based administrators completed the trainings.
Revised Briefing ID #: 6667 to All PRINCIPALS/AP'S: Procedures for Discipline of Students with
Disabilities for Dissemination
Conducted a refresher training for Program Specialists and Staffing Specialists on new electronic IEP
system. 8/19/2010 - 9/10/2010
Conducted two separate full-day professional development sessions for Program Specialists and Staffing
Specialists on August 26th and 27th emphasizing the areas of non-compliance findings by the FLDOE. 79
specialists completed the trainings.
Developed new form "Special Education and Related Services Required for Students with Disabilities
Suspended over 10 Days in a School Year"
Additional Information
Administrators should review and monitor Special Education
(SPED) Suspension Reports, Product Report #T32007503;
Administrative Referrals to Alternative Suspension Report,
Product #0503P3101; and the Quarterly COGNOS Suspension
Report.
Review and share with SPED staff the two forms attached to
Weekly Briefing #8729:
Corrective Action for Indoor Suspension
Corrective Action for Outdoor Suspension
FLDOE has revised the Notice for Procedural Safeguards for
Parents of Students with Disabilities which is posted on the
SPED website: http://ese.dadeschools.net
How Are We Doing?
The District’s 2010 LEA Profile and
Determination
What Are LEA Determinations?
• The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004
(IDEA 2004), Section 616 requires each State to make
determinations on the performance of each local district.
• The U.S. Department of Education through the Office of
Special Education Programs (OSEP) is also required to
engage in making a Determination for every State and U.S.
Territory.
• Determinations are a way of designating the status of each
LEA program in relation to one of the four following
categories:
1. Meets Requirements
2. Needs Assistance
3. Needs Intervention
4. Needs Substantial Intervention
44
LEA PROFILE
A Systematic Tool for Use In Planning for Systematic
Improvement in Special Education Programs
• The District’s Special Education Report Card
• Aligned with the State Performance Plan Indicators
• Establishes Benchmarks and Targets for each
indicator
• Required for Federal Reporting in accordance with
IDEA.
• Student Data is Reported at Designated Survey
Periods
• Failure to Meet the Designated Targets Results in a
Designation of “N”
• Profile Indicator Designations lead to District LEA
Determinations
2010 LEA PROFILE
SECTION FIVE: SELECTED STATE PERFORMANCE PLAN INDICATORS
The following table includes selected state performance plan indicators, the state targets for 2008-09 for these indicators, district data, and whether or not the district met the
target. State targets are presented in bold. Because rounding is not used in determining if targets have been met, LEA data contain as many decimal places as needed to
determine if the target has been reached. If, for example, 3.9% of students with disabilities in a given district drop out of school, the district will not be considered as having met
the target of 4.0%. For indicators 4, 9, and 10, an “N” in the Target Met column means that a district’s data contributed to Florida not making the state target.
Indicator
2008-09 State-Level Target
1
Graduation rate
The percentage of students graduating with a standard diploma in 2007-08 will increase to 40.3%.
41.70%
Y
2
Dropout rate
The dropout rate for students with disabilities in 2007-08 will decrease to 4.0%.
7.49%
N
97.9%
Y
3
97% of students with disabilities in grades three through ten will participate in statewide assessment for reading.
Participation and performance of
97% of students with disabilities in grades three through ten will participate in statewide assessment for math.
children with disabilities on statewide 43% of students with disabilities in grades three through ten will demonstrate proficiency in reading.
assessments
45% of students with disabilities in grades three through ten will demonstrate proficiency in math.
4
Rates of suspension and expulsion
5
FAPE in the LRE, children ages 6-21
8
Parent involvement
LEA Data
Target Met
97.8%
Y
30.7%
N
34.9%
N
4.26
N
51.12%
N
21.67%
N
2.48%
Y
50.5%
Y
38% of parents with a child in K-12 receiving special education services report that schools facilitate parent involvement as a
means of improving services and results for children with disabilities.
32.5%
N
The percent of districts with a significant discrepancy in 2007-08 (a risk ratio of 3.0 or higher) will decrease to 7.5%.
Increase the percentage of students with IEPs age 6 to 21 years removed from regular class placement for less than 21% of the
day to 58.8%.
Decrease the percentage of student with IEPs age 6-21 years removed from regular class placement for greater than 60% of the
day to 21.3%.
Decrease the percentage of students with IEPs age 6 to 21 years served in public or private separate schools, residential
placements, or homebound or hospital placements to 2.6%.
47% of parents with a preschool child receiving special education services report that schools facilitate parent involvement as a
means of improving services and results for children with disabilities.
9
Disproportionality in Special
Education
In 0% of districts with disproportionate representation of racial and ethnic groups in special education and related services, the
disproportionality can be attributed to inappropriate identification.
0.0%
Y
10
Disproportionality in Specific
Disability Categories
In 0% of districts with disproportionate representation of racial and ethnic groups in special education and related services, the
disproportionality can be attributed to inappropriate identification.
0.0%
Y
11
Evaluation within 60 Days
86.0%
N
12
Part C children eligible for Part B who
have IEPs developed and
implemented by their third birthday
100.0%
Y
15
Correction of noncompliance
100% of noncompliance identified through the general supervision system will be corrected no later than one year from
identification.
100.0%
Y
20
Timely and accurately reported data* 100% of state reported data (618 and State Performance Plan and Annual Performance Report) are timely and accurate.
75.0%
N
100% of students referred, with parental consent, for evaluation are evaluated within 60 school days of which the student is in
attendance.
100% of children served and referred by part C prior to age 3, who are found eligible for Part B, have an IEP developed and
implemented by their third birthday.
*Indicator 20 is calculated based on timely submission of data for Indicators 11 and 12, accuracy of data submitted for indicator 5, and timely correction of noncompliance for indicator 15.
LEA Profile
Indicator 3, 4, 5 Cluster
The Trinity of Achievement for SWD
Statewide
Assessments
Suspension
and
Expulsions
LRE
The Tree of Influence
•What is the 3/4/5 Cluster?
•Why are these indicators clustered?
•How do these influence the achievement of SWD?
Best Practices for Indicator 3
Participation and Performance of Students with
Disabilities on Statewide Assessments
•
•
•
•
•
•
Ensure students with mild disabilities are included in general ed classrooms
and are remediated with general education peers.
Ensure that all SWD participate in the appropriate Assessments
Ensure Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) is being taken by
students with mild disabilities
Develop and use data system that tracks students by disability who are taking
FCAT/Florida Alternate Assessment FLAA ( make extra sure SLD are not taking
FLAA).
If subgroup SWD is not making w/AYP, make sure classes/schedules match;
monitor to ensure progress.
Monitor IEPs, student schedules for “match” and also monitor for LRE
compliance.
Continued - Best Practices for
Indicator 3
Participation and Performance of Students with Disabilities on
Statewide Assessments
• Analyze FCAT and reports on progress/proficiency.
• Compare/contrast subgroups, grade levels, for SWD
• Ensure that school leadership teams are monitoring data and using
it wisely to drive decisions
• Try something different if it is not working for individual or groups of
SWD in the learning communities)
• Train staff to making appropriate decisions when developing IEPs
and properly align to the students’ curriculum/instructional
pathway, course schedule with the appropriate SSS standards
and statewide assessment
• Make sure teachers of SWDs who met exemption criteria are
trained for the administration of the FLAA
• Disseminate Accommodations: Services for Students with
Disabilities, Next Generation Sunshine State Standards and
Resources
Best Practices for Indicator 5
FAPE IN the LRE, Students Ages 6-21
• Analyze your schools LRE Data with a focus on Inclusion (e.g.
Adequate yearly progress (AYP), student growth
• Expand the implementation of more inclusive practices
• Always consider general education first
• Provide for a continuum of services
• Ensure teachers are implementing Differentiated Instruction,
Inclusive Practices, Accommodations, Flexible Scheduling,
Collaborative Practices, Problem Solving and Response to
Intervention
• Maximize efficiencies of instructional resources through scheduling
• Use SPED teachers to both provide resource (pull out) or (push in)
instructional support such in class support, support facilitation and
provide direct instruction to SWD in regular Ed classroom
• Participate in training and support provided through the Florida
Inclusion Network to increase the school’s capacity
• Implement co-teaching when appropriate
Best Practices for Indicator 4
Rates of Suspensions of Students with Disabilities
• Review the Code of Student Conduct and Procedures or
Maintaining a Safe Learning Environment and make sure there is a
universal understanding of it at School, Region and District.
• Clearly Define the terms, “What is disruptive?”
• Strive for implementing policies with consistency throughout School,
Region and District
• Analyze existing sources of behavioral data
• Conduct Functional Assessments of Behavior and Develop Behavior
Intervention Plans for all Students
• Review Suspension Reports for SWD
• Monitor reports and use the problem solving approach to implement
strategies to provide alternatives to suspension
• Implement PBS (district wide/school wide)
Best Practices for Indicator 5
FAPE IN the LRE, Students Ages 6-21
• Analyze your schools LRE Data with a focus on Inclusion (e.g.
Adequate yearly progress (AYP), student growth
• Expand the implementation of more inclusive practices
• Always consider general education first
• Provide for a continuum of services
• Ensure teachers are implementing Differentiated Instruction,
Inclusive Practices, Accommodations, Flexible Scheduling,
Collaborative Practices, problem Solving and Response to
Intervention
• Maximize efficiencies of instructional resources through scheduling
• Use SPED teachers to both provide resource (pull out) or (push in)
instructional support such in class support, support facilitation and
provide direct instruction to SWD in regular Ed classroom
• Participate in training and support provided through the Florida
Inclusion Network to increase the school’s capacity
• Implement co-teaching when appropriate
Focus on the Least
Restrictive Environment
Continuum of Service Delivery Models
Service Delivery Model determined at individual IEP
meetings—based on student need
SPED teachers used effectively to comply with IEPs
Collaborative teachers understanding their roles
Consultation occurring where indicated by IEP
Expanding Inclusive Practices
Service Delivery Models will
be based on these Essential
Questions:
•
•
•
•
•
What supports will students need?
When will they need them?
Where will supports be needed?
Who will provide supports?
How can we effectively meet the
needs of all the students?
#1
TEAM APPROACH
• INCLUDE ALL KEY PERSONNEL
– PRINCIPAL, AP, APC, COUNSELORS, GENERAL
ED DEPT CHAIRS, SPED PROGRAM SPECIALIST,
REGISTRAR, CURRICULUM, SUPPORT
PERSONNEL
• IN-DEPTH UNDERSTANDING OF
INCLUSIONARY PRACTICES
#2 MODELS OF SUPPORT
• How are the inclusion models
determined?
• What are the roles of the teachers?
• What type of students get “included”?
#3 PREPARE SCHOOL
PERSONNEL
• OPTIONS FOR PREPARING STAFF:
– ADMINISTRATIVE AND FACULTY AWARENESS
• FACULTY OVERVIEW
• STUDY GROUPS
• TEACHERS’ INPUT
– COLLABORATIVE TEACHING
• PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
• TRAIN THE TRAINERS AT SCHOOL SITE
• EMPOWER / SUPPORT TEACHERS
#4 IMPLEMENTATION
• STRUCTURE FOR FOLLOW-UP
• ONGOING PARTNERSHIPS
– Is there time allotted at faculty meetings?
– Is inclusion addressed at all?
– Is it a special education issue?
Offer Inclusive Practices
“Tune-Ups”
#5 CONTINUOUS MONITORING
• Regularly scheduled follow-up centered
around student issues
• Opportunities for collaboration
between general education and SPED
partners
Inclusion is a better use of
resources…
Remember that
Inclusion is all
about SCHEDULING
LRE – Where Are We? Where Do We
Need to Go?
• The District’s 2010 LEA Profile LRE
Inclusion Data for % of students served
80% or more of their time with nondisabled peers is 51%
• The State’s Average is 67%
The district LRE goal is
60.8% for 2010-11
• What that means for elementary schools:
– 70%-90%
• What that means for middle schools:
– 70%-90%
• What that means for high schools:
– 60%-80%
What’s your school’s inclusion
percentage?
Pay Attention to SWD
Subgroups Achievement Data
Florida Assessment for Instruction in
Reading (FAIR)
Interim Assessments
FCAT
SAT-10
Criterion Referenced Tests
Florida Alternate Assessment
STATE ASSESSMENT
• FCAT
– Must be given to all SPED students grades 3
to 10 that do not meet exemption criteria
• Florida Alternate Assessment
– Must be given to all SPED students grades 3
to 10 that are exempt from the FCAT
• Sunshine State Standards with Access
Points
– For students on a modified curriculum
How can I increase
student achievement
for SWDs at my school?
Implement Inclusive Practices
• Work with your school staff through the IEP
process to identify more SWDs that could be
served and scheduled in general education
settings with supports.
• Research and Data Supports that SWDs
spending 80% or more of their time with nondisabled peers out perform on state
assessments those SWDs served in more
restrictive educational learning environments
Miami-Dade County -Results of the review of 2009 and 2010 FCAT Learning Gains in Reading
for ESE students in different Least Restrictive Educational Environment
The results of both reading gains (for two years 2009 and
2010) and the average Developmental Scale Scores
indicate that students in the 80-100% inclusion
settings are scoring higher.
Other District Actions: LEA Profile
Indicators 3, 4 and 5 Clusters:
Inclusion and Achievement
• Realigned SLD/Inclusion Team
to feeder patterns
• Collaborative efforts with
region
• Collection of school FAIR and
inclusion data to determine
school’s needing assistance in
feeder patterns
• Purchased research-based
supplemental materials that
address achievement needs
• Provide professional
development and monitoring of
the implementation of those
materials with students with
disabilities
• Provide region specific
professional development (e.g.,
differentiate instruction;
collaborative teaching/planning)
• Monitoring of achievement and
inclusion data
• Disseminate information related
to achievement and inclusion to
SLD/VE teachers through
monthly LD Blast
• Aligned SLD/Inclusion website
to achievement and inclusion
http://sldinclusion.dadeschools.net/
LEA Profile
Indicators 3, 4 and 5 Clusters:
Indicator 4: Miami-Dade County Suspension Rates for Students with
Disabilities
Risk Ratio
2005-06: 4.40
4.4
4.2
2006-07: 4.37
4
3.8
2007-08: 4.26
3.6
3.4
3.2
2008-09: 3.70
Based on data from the Florida
Department of Education (FDOE)
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
Possible Strategies before deciding to give
Outdoor Suspension to a Student with
Disabilities
• Strengthen the use of SCSI programs
within schools
• Utilize Alternative to Suspension Program
• Limiting outdoor suspensions to fewer
than ten days for minor infraction
• Review and revise, if needed Behavioral
Intervention Plan (BIP) and Positive
Behavioral Supports and Interventions
Possible Strategies before deciding to give
Outdoor Suspension to a Student with
Disabilities
• Strengthen the use of SCSI programs
within schools
• Utilize Alternative to Suspension Program
• Limiting outdoor suspensions to fewer
than ten days for minor infraction
• Review and revise, if needed Behavioral
Intervention Plan (BIP) and Positive
Behavioral Supports and Interventions
DOMAIN RATING AND
FEFP LINE NUMBER
• 251-253
– 111 (Grades preK-3, with ESE Services)
– 112 (Grades 4-8, with ESE Services)
– 113 (Grades 9-12, with ESE Services)
• 254 (Support Level 4)
• 255 (Support Level 5)
KEY COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS
ISIS
Cumulative
Record
Folder
Matrix
IEP
1. Are roles clearly defined?
2. Who conducts and/or monitors the “Records Review”
process at your school? FM 7069.pdf
3. Who else monitors ISIS data, EMS, IEPs, and Matrixes?
4. How do you know you received all the records you
needed?
5. Who monitors the students’ attendance & suspensions?
6. Does the Master Schedule meet the SPED students’
needs?
7. What is the role of the LEA?
Elementary Scheduling
• Students With Disabilities placed in general
education receive the general education course
number for that course/period
• The general education teacher is the teacher of
record and NOT the special education teacher.
• For students with disabilities receiving in-class
support (co-teaching or support facilitation) by a
SPED teacher within a general education
classroom, the suffix “IN” must be added to the
general education course number.
• The students schedule in ISIS PF1 must reflect
the IEP
Secondary Scheduling
• General Education Setting
– Consultative (external
Facilitation
(in-class
subject/period)
support) and Support
support for part of a
• must receive the general education course number for
that course/period with the general education teacher
of record
– Co-teaching (in-class support for a full subject/period)
• must receive the general education course number for
that course/period with the general education teacher
of record
• SPED teacher can be indicated as the second teacher
• Indicate co-teacher in ISIS PF9 (refer to Weekly
Briefing #3532)
Secondary Scheduling
• Special Education Setting (separate class)
– Students are enrolled in a general education
course
• General education course code hard-coded FTE Line
200
• SPED teacher is the teacher of record
– Students are enrolled in a special education
course
• Special education course codes are used (7700,
7800, 7900)
• SPED teacher is the teacher of record
• Course hours will be in ISIS PF4
Consultation/Collaboration
• Enter “Y” in ISIS PF17 when SPED
services are delivered in the general
education setting for one or more classes
– In accordance with the IEP
– If student is in the general education setting
all day, “fully included”, the IEP must have
consultation/collaboration documented and a
“Y” entered in the ISIS PF17 screen.
• Not applicable for student with “speech impaired”
only
Matrix of Services Form
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The Matrix domain rating must be updated in ISIS
PF17 to reflect the current Matrix in the cumulative
folder
The Matrix must not be more than 3 years old
The Matrix must be reviewed (initial/complete date)
with each interim and/or annual IEP meeting and list
all the services on the IEP
If changes are made to the IEP a new Matrix must be
written rather than reviewed
Special consideration points must be reviewed
Carefully monitor students funded at a 254-255 cost
factor in your school
Review IEP and Matrix form for students returning
from the Homebound/Hospital Instructional Program
SPED RECORDS
• Cumulative Record Folder is available and
organized
• SPED forms for initial placement are
available including:


SST/RTI, consent for evaluation,
psychological evaluation, notice of meeting,
program eligibility, consent for placement,
IEP, and Matrix of Services are available
SPED forms for all subsequent evaluations
IEPs, and Matrix forms are available
SPED / IEP RECORDS
• Current IEP with status reporting completed on
goals quarterly
• The IEP is signed by at least 3 different M-DCPS
employees


The LEA must participate and sign all IEPs
The LEA insures the IEP is properly developed,
implemented, and reported in ISIS
• The student is invited to IEP meetings beginning
at age 14
• Current Matrix of Services form completed for
each annual or interim IEP meeting
Matrix of Services
1. Do you know your students matrix levels?
2. Are you aware of the financial impact of the
matrixes?
3. What procedure do you have in place to ensure
you accurately capture the services you provide?
4. What is the role of the Administrative Team in
monitoring?
Common Matrix Errors
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
The Matrix domain rating is not properly updated in
ISIS PF17
The Matrix is more than 3 years old
Matrix is not prepared or missing
The Matrix is not properly documented (dates) with
each interim and annual review
The Matrixes are too low or too high and do not
match the services on the IEP
Changes are made to the Matrix instead of a new
one being written
Special consideration points not included
To avoid areas of VERY COSTLY
non-compliance:
• Be aware of every student funded at a 254-255
cost factor in your school &
– Verify the Matrix is correctly calculated based on the
current IEP
– Verify the domain rating is correct in ISIS
• Address students returning from Hospital
Homebound Instructional to verify domain rating
of 255 has been deleted or updated

Control-D reports, PARIS, File Download Manager, and
COGNOS are helpful resources
To avoid areas of
VERY COSTLY non-compliance:
• All SPED teachers/LEA must have Matrix
of Services training
• All SPED teachers/LEA must utilize the
Matrix Handbook for completion of form
• All SPED teachers/LEA must maintain the
corresponding documentation
GENERAL RESOURCES
M-DCPS ESE Policies and Procedures (SP&P) 2009-2010 through 20112012 http://ehandbooks.dadeschools.net/policies/149.pdf
 M-DCPS LEA Guide
http://ehandbooks.dadeschools.net/policies/17.pdf
 FLDOE https://www.fldoe.org/
 FLDOE Technical Assistance Papers http://www.fldoe.org/ese/taphome.aspsp
 Special Ed Connection www.specialedconnection.com/
 Username: mdcps
 Password: kids
 Exceptional Student Education Compliance Self-Assessment: Process and
Procedures Manual http://www.fldoe.org/ese/mon-home.asp
 Florida standards www.flstandards.org
http://www.fldoe.org/ese/mon-home.asp
 www.flstandards.org

SPED Website
Briefings
http://ese.dadeschools.net
Who’s Who in SPED?
Do you have a question about ESE?
Contact us and get the answers.
Ms. Ava Goldman, Administrative Director
Office of Special Education and Educational Services
305-995-2037
Mr. Will Gordillo, District Director
Division of Special Education
305-995-2027
Ms. Sonja Clay, Executive Director
Programs
305-995-7243
For more information visit us on the web:
http://ese.dadeschools.net
http://psy.dadeschools.net
Allocations, Section 504, ESY,
& McKay Scholarships
IDEA Private Schools
Obligations
Ms. Mary Paz
Instructional Supervisor
305-995-1816
Ms. Claudia Leary
Curriculum Support Specialist
305-274-8889
Autism Spectrum Disorder,
Speech & Language, & Dual
Sensory Impaired
Dr. Ann Marie Sasseville
Instructional Supervisor
305-995-2121
Bilingual /ESOL SPED Program,
Program for Visually Impaired,
Learning Disabilities & IDEA
Private School Obligations
Ms. Rosalia Gallo
Instructional Supervisor
305-274-8889
Compliance
Ms. Edna Waxman
Instructional Supervisor
305-995-7419
Florida Diagnostic and Learning
Resources System-South
(FDLRS-S), Deaf Hard of
Hearing & Audiological Services
Ms. Delsey Yancoskie
Instructional Supervisor
305-274-3501
Florida Diagnostic and Learning
Resources system- (FDLRS-N)
North Satellite
Ms. Keisha Robinson
Instructional Supervisor
305-754-4081
IDEA Budget Specialist
Ms. Esther Calvo-Chebbi
Budget Supervisor
305-995-2759
Dr. Sue Buslinger-Clifford
Instructional Supervisor
305-995-1735
Region I
Inclusion
Ms. Deidre M. Phillips
FIN Facilitator
305-754-4081
Intellectual Disabilities, Physical
Impairment & Transition
Services
Ms. Jill Brookner
Instructional Supervisor
305-995-2168
Occupational Therapy (OT),
Physical Therapy (PT), SPED
Transportation Liaison &
Assistive Technology
Ms. Guirla Dodard
Instructional Supervisor
305-274-3501
Ms. Lou Schmitt
Instructional Supervisor
305-274-3501
Project Victory
Mr. Nicholas Chang
Curriculum Support Specialist
305-995-2719
Ms. Alfredia D. Robinson
Instructional Supervisor
305-687-6565 ext: 2147
Region II
Ms. Kathryn Cadieux
Instructional Supervisor
305-523-0901ext: 0928
Region III
Ms. Arlene Exelbert
Instructional Supervisor
305-883-0447
Ms. Robin J. Morrison
Instructional Supervisor
305-995-1806
Ms. Suzanne Milano-Berrios
Director
305 995-7315
Multiagency Network (SEDNET)
Ms. Dianne Halfaker
Curriculum Support Specialist
305-598-2436
Ms. Terry Reyes-Gavilan
Supervisor
305-995-2798
Region IV
Ms. Kathy Maguire
Instructional Supervisor
305-275-3710
Region V
Ms. Helene Chait
Instructional Supervisor
305-258-7100 ext: 2275
Region VI
Education Transformation Office
(ETO)
Viviana Arias, Instructional
Supervisor
305-995-3091
Merrick Ed. Center
Neva King Cooper Ed. Center
Ms. Deborah Wehking
Principal
305-445-5188
Robert Renick Ed. Center
Ms. Paulette Covin-Fredrik
Principal
305-624-1171
Dr. Alberto T. Fernandez
Principal
305-247-4307
Ruth Owens Krusé Ed. Center
Dr. Angel L. Rodriguez
Principal
305-270-8699
Instructional Systemwide/ SPED Outreach
Ms. Sonja Clay
Executive Director
305-995-7243
Dr. Terrence Vaccaro
Executive Director
305-995-7015
Thank you and have a
great day!

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