moriarty_app9_inppt_11

Report
Part 4
Practice: Where are Media Headed?
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11-1
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How do media work in marketing
communication and how is the industry
organized?
How would you describe the key strategic
media concepts?
Why and how is the media landscape changing?
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Media refers to the way messages are delivered to
target audiences and increasingly, back to companies
and among audience members.
Media is the go-between step in the communication
model; the way messages are sent and returned by
the source and receiver.
Here, the source and receiver are the company or
brand, and its customers.
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All marketing communication areas use a variety of media
to deliver messages to customers.
In traditional mass media, it is a one-way process from
source to receiver.
Today’s media are also interactive, because they offer
opportunities for dialogue and two-way conversation.
Media also offer engagement opportunities and connect a
brand with its audience.
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We can summarize the evolution of media as follows:
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The Print Era
Ink and print images reproduced as newspapers,
magazines, and posters.
The Broadcast Era
Visual and audio information in the form of radio
and television programs.
The Digital Era
Electronic information transmitted through the
Internet, cable and satellite.
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Every technological advance has threatened the
older media, and every new medium is launched in
the footprints of its predecessor media.
A more serious shift is occurring in the 21st
century, as computers and the Internet personalize
media.
Word of mouth also delivers personalization. It is a
powerful new marketing communication force.
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Wire dancers on an
oversized billboard brought
the Microsoft logo to life for
the launch of the Vista
operating system—an
example of a highly
engaging use of outdoor
advertising.
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As a class:
Check out how consumers are converting their TVs into
new multimedia centers in A Matter of Practice:
“People Really Enjoy Their Large-Screen Televisions”.
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The modern media landscape features:
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Up to 200 TV channels in some markets
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Numerous special-interest publications
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Millions of websites
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New media forms unimaginable 20 years ago
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On the selling side:
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Media salespeople work for a magazine or TV station;
provide sales kits with information about audience
and medium.
Media reps or brokers are people/companies who sell
space and time for a variety of media, allowing the
media buyer to make an entire buy with one order.
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Media researchers compile
audience measurement data,
media costs, and availability for
various media.
Media planners develop the
strategic decisions outlined in the
media plan, such as where and
when to advertise and which type
of media to use.
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Media buyers implement the media
plan by contracting for specific
amounts of time or space, based on
the plan developed by the media
planner.
Media buying companies specialize
in media research, planning, and
buying. They may be a spinoff from
an advertising agency, and work for
a variety of clients.
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The challenge is to manage all available media
opportunities, yet maximize budgets.
All of this decision making comes together in a
media plan.
The goal is to maximize message impact while
minimizing cost.
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Media Mix
The way various types of media are strategically
combined to create a certain kind of impact.
Multiplatform
Describes multichannel and multimarketing
opportunities, including:
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Social media
Branded entertainment
Video games
Product placement
Guerilla marketing
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Targets and Audiences
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The goal of the media plan is to match the
advertiser’s target audience with the audience of a
particular medium.
As a class:
 See the Inside Story feature for an example of
tight targeting.
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Here, a University of Florida student advertising
agency developed a customized campaign for the
university’s student travel program.
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Media audiences
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Traditionalists grew up with newspapers
magazines, and radio.
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Boomers, now in their 50s and 60s, also grew up
with television.
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Gen Xers, now in their 30s and 40s, also grew up
with tape recorders, video games, VCRs and cable
TV.
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Media audiences…
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Gen Yers, now twenty-somethings, also grew up
with the computer, satellite TV, the Internet, CDs,
and cell phones.
Millennials, the most recent generation, have
grown up with DVDs, TiVo, satellite radio, iPods,
smar phones, Second Life, MySpace, Facebook,
and Twitter.
The media planner’s challenge is to match the
target audience with the medium’s audience.
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Exposure
Where all media effects all begin.
Impressions
One person’s opportunity to be
exposed one time to an ad in a
specific vehicle.
Circulation
Refers to number of copies sold.
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Gross Impressions
The estimation of total impressions across a
publication’s total circulation.
Ratings
A measure that converts gross impressions to
percentage of households.
Share
Refers to the percent of viewers based on the
number of sets turned on.
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Reach and frequency
 Reach is the percentage of the media audience
exposed at least once to the advertiser’s message
during a specific time frame.
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Frequency is the number of times a person is
exposed to an advertisement
◦ You have to hear/see an ad three times for it to
make an impact.
The goal of a media plan is to reach as many people
in the target audience as often as the budget allows.
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Intrusiveness
 The ability of a medium to grab
attention by being disruptive or
unexpected.
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The more intrusive a medium, the
more it can be personalized, but
also more costly to use.
If a message is too disruptive or
irritating, it may not help build a
positive brand relationship.
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IMC and media
 IMC works to create, sustain, and strengthen brand
relationships over time.
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Relationship marketing shifts the focus from a onetime purchase to long-term involvement from all
critical stakeholders.
All stakeholders are seen as communicators who
can send either positive or negative messages about
the brand.
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Contact points are the various ways
a consumer comes in contact with
a brand.
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These can be:
◦ Newspapers and magazines
◦ Outdoor boards and posters
◦ Radio and television
But also:
◦ The Internet
◦ Packages and labels
◦ Company trucks and cars
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Recall the seventh principle of IMC:
“All contact points deliver brand messages.”
In other words:
“Everything that delivers a message to a stakeholder
about a brand is a contact point.”
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A touch point is a brand experience that delivers a
message that touches emotions leading to positive
and negative judgments.
A critical touchpoint (CTP) is one that connects the
brand and customer on an emotional level and leads
to a yes or no decision about a brand relationship.
Experiential marketing utilizes events, store design,
and other means to engage customers in a personal
and involving way.
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Packaging:
 is both a container and a communication vehicle.
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is the last ad a customer sees before making a
decision on which brand to buy.
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is a constant brand reminder in the home or office.
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presents brand image and communicates critical
benefits such as recipes.
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Pepperidge Farm, with its consistent design and distinctive brand
image, dominates cookie shelves because of the power of its
consistent design across all the brand’s variations.
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Word of mouth
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Buzz is important because it means people are
talking about a brand.
The goal of buzz-builder strategies is to the
right people saying the right things about the
brand.
As a class:
Burger King has been lauded as the “king of buzz.”
Do you agree? What examples can you think of?
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Viral communication
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Viral marketing strategies
create a groundswell of
demand for a brand.
Consumers create
buzz through:
◦ E-mails
◦ Blogs
◦ Facebook
◦ YouTube
◦ Twitter
The “Subservient Chicken”
interactive video website for
Burger King.
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Customer service
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represents a company’s attitude and behavior
during interactions with customers.
sends some of the most impactful brand messages
that customers receive.
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Customer service
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Go online at www.zappos.com
and locate the “zappets” (employees).
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What kinds of brand messages do they send
through their customer service?
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Consumers’ use of media is changing as fast as the
technology.
Significant trends:
◦ Media consumers are active, in control, and
entertained.
◦ Lives are media focused.
◦ Personal life has become public.
◦ Global has become local.
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Rather than controlling media choices, consumers
are designing their own media landscapes.
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This is known as consumer-generated content.
Two major changes in media use patterns:
1. Media-driven lives
2. Media multitasking
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This is the most creative time in the history of
commercial media.
Older media are converging with new media and
new forms are being created faster than we can
learn how to use them.
The search for new ways to reach target audiences
is key for advertisers trying to reach the elusive
youth market.
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Guerilla marketing
Uses the power of involvement to create memorable
brand experiences.
Creates unexpected personal encounters with a
brand.
Examples:
◦ Sears used computer-equipped Segways in Chicago.
◦ Vodaphone used holographic ads featuring
Portuguese soccer players.
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Product placement
 A company pays for verbal or visual brand exposure
in a movie or TV program.
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It is less intrusive than conventional advertising.
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The product is the star.
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Celebrities demonstrate product in natural setting.
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Unexpected; occurs when viewer resistance is down.
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Product placement
 However, it may go unnoticed.
 It may not match the movie or audience.
 The movie may not be successful.
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Movie examples:
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TV examples:
◦ Up in the Air: American Airlines and Hilton Hotels
◦ The World is not Enough: BMW Z28
◦ American Idol: Coca-Cola and Ford
◦ Survivor: Target Stores
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These painted stairs at
the Denver Pavilions,
an entertainment
complex in downtown
Denver, advertise
membership in the
nearby Colorado
Athletic Club.
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Video games
 A major new medium for advertisers to target 12to-34-year-old males, and other groups.
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Opportunities exist both in creating games and
placing products within games.
For an innovative example, go to:
http://smashhits.guitarhero.com
As a class: What types of advertising can you spot on
this website?
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Branded entertainment (or advertainment)
 Companies produce films for the Internet where the
brand is integrated into the storyline.
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Webisodes have created a new form of Web
advertising.
For an example, review the “Inside Story: Axe Cleans
Up.”
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Mobile marketing
 The phone is a classic example of how the media
are shifting.
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Smart phones have computing and photographic
capabilities, and can access the Internet.
Text messaging and instant messaging are now
being used as advertising vehicles.
Mobile marketing is the strategy of reaching people
via their cell phones.
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Branded apps
 Software that runs on your computer, cell phone or
social networking site.
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Marketers like them; they are generally free but
prominently linked to a brand.
For examples, check out Apple and AT&T at:
www.apple.com/iphone/apps-for-iphone/phone
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Other new media
 Streaming videos are joining homemade creations
on YouTube and on smart phones.
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With viral video, interesting videos form a variety of
sources can be sent from one friend to another.
Possibilities are limitless. New media can also
include a range of “low-tech” ideas.
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Cell phones are important to young people, especially young women, who
use their phones as fashion and personal style statements.
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In Chapter 12, we will:
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Review traditional media including:
◦ Print
◦ Outdoor
◦ Broadcast
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Explore the characteristics that make
them different from other media forms.
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“Axe Cleans Up”
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After the Axe Detailer was introduced, sales exceeded
expectations.
The Detailer campaign communicated the correct
branding and taught customers something about the
product.
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“Axe Cleans Up”
Key lessons:
 The Axe campaigns show how marketing contributed
to making Axe the top U.S. male shower brand.
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Creative ideas can be applied to a variety of media and
contexts, all in support of selling the product.
As a class: What others can you think of?
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11-50

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