(Mississippi Valley Flooding) 12 May_2011

Report
YALE/TULANE ESF-8 PLANNING AND RESPONSE PROGRAM SPECIAL REPORT
MAPS
(MISSISSIPPI VALLEY FLOODING)
BACKGROUND
WEATHER
MISSOURI
TENNESSEE
ARKANSAS
MISSISSIPPI
LOUISIANNA
Historic Flooding Continues Along Mississippi...
The crest of the Mississippi River is approaching and
forecast to pass Helena, Ark., by early Thursday
morning.Details...
KEY LINKS
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
DHS
FEMA
Facebook full site / Facebook mobile site
Twitter full site / Twitter mobile site
EPA
HHS
CDC
OSHA
USDA
DOD
NORTHCOM
ARNORTH
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Vicksburg District
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Team New Orleans
HUD
National Weather Service - Slidell Office
National Weather Service - Jackson Office
STATES
FEDERAL RESPONSE
PREPARING FOR A FLOOD
PREVENT ILLNESS AFTER A DISASTER
Arkansas Emergency Management Agency
Facebook full site / Facebook mobile site
Twitter full site / Twitter mobile site
Louisiana Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and
Preparedness
Facebook full site / Facebook mobile site
Twitter full site / Twitter mobile site
Missouri Emergency Management Agency
Facebook full site /
Twitter full site / Twitter mobile site
Mississippi Emergency Management Agency
Facebook full site / Facebook mobile site
Twitter full site / Twitter mobile site
Information on volunteering
AS OF 1200 HRS EDT
12 MAY 2011
Tennessee Emergency Management Agency
Facebook full site
Twitter full site / Twitter mobile site
MISSISSIPPI VALLEY FLOODING 2001
(BACKGROUND)
•
Significant rainfall across the middle Mississippi and Ohio River valleys
over the past month has led to historic, and in some cases record
breaking rises on both rivers.
•
The swollen Mississippi River carried its dangers of flooding and
damage toward the Delta on Wednesday morning as residents in three
prepared for weeks of battling the river’s growing energy.
The river crested just inches below its record stage of 48.7 feet in
Memphis, Tenn., on Tuesday. But, by Wednesday morning, the river
had passed its record in Natchez, Miss., reaching 58 feet and growing,
according to the National Weather Service. Forecasters predict the
river will crest in Natchez on May 21 at about 64 feet.
•
As this water moves downriver, significant rises will occur along the
Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers through southeast and south central
Louisiana.
•
All of the latest river forecasts from the lower Mississippi River Forecast
Center account for the Army Corps of Engineers opening some of the
Bonnet Carre Spillway bays on 9 May 2011 bays with more expected to
be open later this week.
•
The Morganza Spillway will be opened, if the threshold reaches a flow
rate of 1.5 million cubic feet per second. The current flow rate is 1.36
million cubic feet per second; threshold could be reached as early as
May 14
WEATHER
TEMPERATURE
PRECIPITATION
(12 May 2011)
FORECAST
PREDOMINANT WEATHER
SOURCE: http://www.weather.gov
May 13
May 14
May 15
Extended
Forecast
May 16
May 17
SITUATION
(MISSOURI)







FATALITIES: 2 Deaths attributed to flooding
INJURED: 0
DESTRUCTION:
UTILITIES:
SHELTERS: As of May 9, there are 5 shelters are open
with 83 occupants.
STATE DECLARATION: The Governor declared a State of
Emergency on April 22.
FEDERAL Butler, Mississippi, New Madrid, St. Louis, and Taney
Counties
MISSOURI - Severe storms have resulted in flooding issues across
southern Missouri. The Missouri State Highway Patrol and its Water
Patrol Division pre-staged assets to assist evacuations and water
rescues as needed. The State Emergency Management Agency
(SEMA) is currently activated, providing assistance to affected counties
as requested.
LINKS
Missouri Health and Senior
Services
http://health.mo.gov/index.php
River
Flood Stage
Record Stage
Present Stage
Crest
Ohio at Cairo
40 ft
59.5
57.68
Crested May 7
1 pm
Mississippi at:
Missouri Emergency Management
Agency
Twitter
Flickr
Facebook
http://sema.dps.mo.gov/
Chester
27 ft
49.74
31.32 Falling
Crested May 1
Cape Girardeau
32 ft
48.5
38.27 Falling
Crested May 1
Thebes
33 ft
45.9
37.96 Falling
Crested May 2
New Madrid
34 ft
48.0
47.11 Falling
Crested May 6
Tiptonville
37ft
47.8
47.02 Rising
Crested May 7
Caruthersville
32 ft
46.0
46.69 Rising
Crested May 7
http://twitter.com/#!/mogov/
http:[email protected]/
http://www.facebook.com/mogov
Black River
NOAA Weather Radio for TN
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/nwr/Maps/PHP/Misso
uri.php
National Weather Service Watches, http://www.weather.gov/alerts-beta/mo.php?x=1
Warnings and Advisories
1 pm
Annapolis
08 ft
27.38
5.1 Falling
Crested May 2
Poplar Bluff
16 ft
21.7
11.65 Falling
Crested May 3
1 pm
St. Francis River
Fisk
20 ft
28.0
21.38 Falling
Crested May 3
SITUATION
(TENNESSEE)
 FATALITIES: 38 confirmed fatalities (tornadoes) (1 flooding)
 INJURED: 94 Injured (tornadoes)
 DESTRUCTION: Multiple counties reported damages to homes, road closures,
SHELTERS: There are 10 shelters open in West Tennessee with 516 occupants
STATE DECLARATION: The Governor has declared a State of Emergency for the
State of Tennessee
 FEDERAL DECLATION: The President approved Major Disaster Declaration
FEMA-1979-DR for Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding
on April 19, 2011 and continuing. The declaration provides Individual Assistance
for Dyer, Lake, Obion, Shelby, and Stewart Counties. Also, provides Public
Assistance for The counties of Benton, Carroll, Crockett, Dyer, Gibson, Henderson,
Henry, Houston, Lake, Lauderdale, Madison, Montgomery, Obion, Shelby, and
Stewart to include Direct Federal assistance is authorized. All counties in the State
of Tennessee are eligible to apply for assistance under the Hazard Mitigation Grant
Program. The Federal Coordinating Officer is W. Montague Winfield. On May 9,
2011, the President approved Major Disaster Declaration FEMA-1978-DR was
declared for severe storms, flooding, tornadoes, and straight-line winds that
occurred April 4, 2011. The declaration provides Public Assistance for Chester,
Davidson, Decatur, Dickson, Henderson, Humphreys, Lake, Shelby, and Sumner
Counties. All counties in the State of Tennessee are eligible to apply for assistance
under the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program.
LINKS
Tennessee Department of Public Health
Tennessee Emergency Management
Agency
Twitter
Flickr
Facebook
http://health.state.tn.us/
http://www.tnema.org/index.php
http://twitter.com/#!/t_e_m_a
http://www.flickr.com/photos/t_e_m_a
http://www.facebook.com/TNDisasterIn
fo
NOAA Weather Radio for Missouri
http://www.weather.gov/nwr/Maps/PHP
/Missouri.php
National Weather Service Watches,
Warnings and Advisories
http://www.weather.gov/alertsbeta/tn.php?x=1
•
The Mississippi River levees in the Memphis area are performing as designed. The crest is
projected to pass Memphis on today.
•
Some areas of Memphis are experiencing backwater flooding; that is the water that would
normally drain into the river but cannot because of the river’s high water levels. These affected
parts are in low-lying areas prone to flooding, not protected by the federal levee system. .
•
Recovery efforts from the recent flood will be slow and costly. Code inspectors with the City of Memphis
and Shelby County will conduct assessments of the flood damage. It may be several days before damage
reports are complete due to the high flood waters.
•
No one should come into contact with flood waters. Flood waters are full of contaminates and could lead
to serious health problems.
•
Many roads are still blocked by high water. Motorists should expect traffic delays for the next several
days and not go around barricades. Vehicles can be carried into rivers and creeks by only a few inches of
water. Submerged roads can also
FLOOD PREDICTIONS
(TENNESSEE)
AREA PROJECTED TO BE IMPACTED BY FLOODING
THROUGH MIDNIGHT 11 MAY 2011
AS OF 08 MAY 2011
Full map available at:
Shelby County Office of Preparedness
RIVER FORECASTS WITHIN 48 HOURS
AS OF 11 MAY 2011, 6:48 PM CDT
Full map available at:
NWS Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Services
SITUATION
(TENNESSEE)
FLOODING IN SHELBY COUNTY (MEMPHIS)
•
Although the Mississippi River has crested, high waters will
continue to be a danger to residents throughout Shelby County
for several days. Rivers and creeks are flowing at swift speeds
and are filled with river debris, trash and other contaminants.
•
Several intersections are still closed due to the high water.
Motorists should expect traffic delays for the next few days and
not go around barricades. Not only can vehicles be carried into
rivers and creeks by only a few inches of water, but submerged
roads could be damaged by sink holes and erosion
EVACUATION & SHELTERING
•
There are six American Red Cross Shelters open (16 on
standby) in West Tennessee with 146 occupants. Memphis and
Shelby County have opened three faith-based shelters (one on
standby) with 368 occupants.
•
To help displaced residents find housing quickly, the Tennessee
Housing Development Agency is urging all property providers to
list available rental housing on the free, statewide housing
locater service www.TNHousingSearch.org as soon as possible.
The process of listing takes about 10 minutes and is completely
free.
NUTRITION ASSISTANCE
•
The Tennessee Department of Human Services, with USDA
approval, began issuing SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition
Assistance Program, formerly food stamps) benefits to eligible
residents of four tornado-ravaged counties that have been
federally declared disaster areas following the late April storms.
•
The benefits are for eligible residents of Bradley, Greene,
Hamilton and Washington counties. Applications for SNAP
disaster benefits can be submitted Monday through Saturday,
May 9-14, and on Monday, May 16.
HEALTH CONCERNS
•
The Tennessee Department of Health is urging Tennesseans to take
extra precautions when returning to flood- or storm-damaged homes
or businesses. Conditions left by severe weather damage can pose a
risk of injury or illness. Safety tips for returning to a damaged building
available here: http://news.tn.gov/node/7125
•
Recent flooding positions the state to see a significant increase in
mosquito activity. Standing water provides the perfect breeding
ground for mosquitoes, and flooded areas in Tennessee could easily
cause populations of these disease-carrying pests to flourish. The
Tennessee Department of Health is reminding the residents working
to clean up homes, businesses and other facilities in Tennessee to
take steps to help prevent illnesses associated with mosquitoes.
Mosquitoes most likely to transmit WNV bite at dawn and dusk. The
best way to prevent WNV infection is to avoid mosquito bites. Tips for
disease prevention available here: http://news.tn.gov/node/7126.
•
There have been several reports of wildlife fleeing floodwaters and
entering business and residential areas, including snakes and deer.
As rivers and creeks rise, wildlife search for food and shelter inside
houses, storage sheds and buildings. Residents are encouraged to
be aware of the possibility of contact with wildlife.
•
Memphis Light, Gas & Water reports that the water supply is safe for
drinking and has not been contaminated.
•
The Tennessee Department of Health has released a number of
reports with tips on re-entering flooded homes, food & water safety,
and protecting yourself from mold. These resources are available at
the TN Department of Health Site:
http://health.state.tn.us/FloodandSafety/floodandsafety.htm
MLGW – Water Remains Safe: 05 May 2011
SCOP Status Update: 10 May 2011
TEMA Status Update: 10 May 2011
TN Gov - Damaged Buildings: 05 May 2011
TN Gov - Mosquito Risk: 05 May 2011
SITUATION
(ARKANSAS)
 FATALITIES: 11 confirmed fatalities (tornadoes)
 INJURED: 14 Injured
 DESTRUCTION: Area struck by severe storms, tornadoes,
and associated flooding beginning on April 23, 2011, and
continues.
 UTILITIES:
 SHELTERS: There are 11 shelters open with 160 occupants
 STATE DECLARATION: The Governor declared a State of
Emergency on April 25.
 FEDERAL DECLATION: Crittenden, Madison, Montgomery,
Phillips, Washington, Benton, Clay, Faulkner, Garland,
Lincoln, Pulaski, Randolph, and Saline Counties
LINKS
Arkansas Department of Public
Health
http://www.healthy.arkansas.gov/
Arkansas Emergency Management http://www.adem.arkansas.gov/ADEM/index.asp
Agency
x
Twitter
http://twitter.com/ar_emergencies
Flickr
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ar_emergencies/
Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/ARemerg
encies
NOAA Weather Radio for TN
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/nwr/Maps/PHP/Arkans
as.php
National Weather Service Watches,
http://www.weather.gov/alerts-beta/ar.php?x=1
Warnings and Advisories
ARKANSAS - Flooding continues along White, Black, and Mississippi Rivers.
Multiple roads are flooded at White River crossings including I-40 east of Little
Rock, AR. The district’s reservoir operations and assistance to local levee boards
have dramatically reduced flood damages in a number of towns in the region. U.S.
Geological Survey field crews continue to measure historic flooding across most of
Arkansas.
River levels are still rising in parts of the state; many have increased by as much
as 15 to 30 feet since heavy rainfall began on April 22. Near real-time river level
and streamflow information from 149 USGS Arkansas streamgage locations is
available online.
USGS scientists continue to collect critical streamflow data that are vital for
protection of life, property and the environment. These data are used by the
National Weather Service (NWS) to develop flood forecasts, the U.S. Army Corps
of Engineers to manage flood control, and the various state and local agencies in
their flood response activities.
The state is bracing for Mississippi River to crest o May 12th.
SITUATION
(MISSISSIPPI)







FATALITIES: 35 confirmed fatalities (tornadoes)
INJURED: 176 injuries (tornadoes)
DESTRUCTION: 350 homes damaged, 540 destroyed homes,
170 mobile homes destroyed, 63 mobile homes damaged, and
62 businesses destroyed and 12 damaged
UTILITIES:
SHELTERS: 1 shelters open with 21 occupants.(ARC)
STATE DECLARATION: The Governor has declared a State of
Emergency for the State of Mississippi.
FEDERAL DECLATION: Alcorn, Attala, Clay, Coahoma, DeSoto,
Grenada, Holmes, Leflore, Marshall, Montgomery, Newton,
Panola, Quitman, Smith, Sunflower, Tishomingo, Tunica,
Winston , Chickasaw, Choctaw, Clarke, Greene, Hinds, Jasper,
Kemper, Lafayette, Monroe, Neshoba and Webster
MS - LINKS
Mississippi Department of Public http://www.healthyms.com/msdhsite/index.cfm/44,0,12
2,292,html
Health
Mississippi Emergency
Management Agency
http://www.msema.org/
Twitter
http://twitter.com/msema
RSS Feeds:
http://www.msema.org/wordpress/?feed=rss2
Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/home.php#/pages/PearlMS/Mississippi-Emergency-ManagementAgency/81599105731?ref=sgm
NOAA Weather Radio for
Mississippi
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/nwr/Maps/PHP/Mississippi.p
hp
National Weather Service
Watches, Warnings and
Advisories
http://www.weather.gov/alerts-beta/ms.php?x=1
A powerful storm system which
began affecting parts of the
state on Tuesday, April 26th,
producing tornadoes in South
Mississippi Tuesday morning
and tornadoes in Northwest
Mississippi Tuesday evening,
intensified on Wednesday, April
27th with dozens of tornadoes
touching down during the early
morning hours and during the
afternoon and evening.
The rain-swollen Mississippi River
inundated evacuated neighborhoods in
the Mississippi Delta on Wednesday and
washed away precious crops, as residents
farther downstream prepared for the
looming floodwaters.
After cresting at 47.8 feet Tuesday in
Memphis, Tenn., the river's high waters
moved south, reaching 58 feet and
growing in Natchez, Miss., the National
Weather Service said. The river is
expected to crest there at 64 feet on May
21.
Across Mississippi, about 1,000 structures
have been hit by floodwaters, and officials
expect to evacuate between 2,000 and
5,000 people in coming days.
In Vicksburg, Miss., 65 homes were
underwater, displacing about 250 people
According to the latest storm
damage assessments, at least
34 tornadoes were found to have
impacted parts of 33 out of
Mississippi's 82 counties from
Tuesday into Wednesday,
including Monroe, Chickasaw,
Lafayette, Tishomingo,
Coahoma, Tunica, Pontotoc,
Alcorn, Sharkey, Sunflower,
Yazoo, Holmes, Leflore, Attala,
Montgomery, Carroll, Grenada,
Choctaw, Webster, Clay,
Kemper, Noxubee, Neshoba,
Winston, Copiah, Hinds, Smith,
Lauderdale, Jasper, Newton,
Clarke, Covington and Jones.
Several of the tornadoes were
confirmed as strong to intense
with six EF-3 tornadoes with
winds up to 150 mph, two EF-4
tornadoes with winds up to 180
mph and one rare and
catastrophic EF-5 tornado with
winds up to 205 mph.
SOURCES
As Mississippi River flooding moves south, more evacuations imminent
Mississippi Storm Damage Update
Jackson Weather Examiner - Over 30 tornadoes tore across MS
SITUATION
(MISSISSIPPI – HEALTH )
• The Mississippi State Department of Health is working with the
Mississippi Emergency Management Agency and the federal
government to monitor the Mississippi River flooding and the impact
it will have on the citizens of Mississippi.
WOMEN, INFANTS AND CHILDREN NUTRITIONAL PROGRAM
(WIC)
WIC services are available at alternate locations to residents affected
by the flood who are currently on or are eligible for the program.
For information on where you can receive WIC services, contact the
county health department in the area where you are currently relocated.
• MSDH Emergency Response Coordinators are working with county
emergency management agencies and local governments on
evacuation plans for areas projected to be flooded.
Visit www.HealthyMS.com for a list of county health departments and
their contact information.
PUBLIC HEALTH
• MSDH is assisting nursing homes, personal care homes, and
hospitals with evacuation and other needs.
• MSDH environmentalists are working with restaurants in the
affected areas to make sure they are aware of the protocol for reopening.
TETANUS
• People in flooded areas may be at risk for tetanus, a bacterium that
can enter the body through a wound. A tetanus vaccination, along
with proper first aid, can prevent infection.
• Clean any puncture wound contaminated by dirt or flood water.
• The Mississippi Public Health Laboratory is testing water samples in
the impacted areas.
• Consult a healthcare provider to determine whether a tetanus
booster is needed.
• MSDH County Environmentalists are inspecting open shelters and
providing technical assistance.
• People who received standard childhood immunizations, and have
had a tetanus booster in the last ten years, do not need the
vaccination.
• An MSDH Advanced Planning Unit is developing patient evacuation
and medical shelter plans, and determining the need for federal
resources.
• For more information on preparing for the flood, visit
www.HealthyMS.com
• MSDH has formed a Healthcare Flood Impact Task Force made up
of 35 Mississippi state agencies and healthcare associations,
including representation for MSDH licensed facilities and hospitals,
to assess potential flood impact and to review and coordinate plans
to lessen the impact on the Mississippi healthcare system.
• MSDH also advises residents affected by the flood to be aware of
the following important information:
MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL HEALTH
Natural disasters like tornadoes can cause serious stress and
depression. Victims of the tornadoes are encouraged to talk about their
feelings, even though it may be difficult and to rely on support groups
like family, friends, local churches, and local community mental health
centers. For more information about behavioral health resources in
your area, contact the Mississippi Department of Mental Health
Helpline at 1-877-210-8513.
SITUATION
(MISSISSIPPI)
ANIMALS
Employees from the Mississippi Board of Animal Health, Mississippi
State University Extension Service, MSU College of Veterinary
Medicine, Farm Bureau, Cattlemen’s Association, the MS Veterinary
Medical Association, Humane Society of the United States and the
National Animal of Recue and Shelter Coalition are working together to
address issues related to pets and livestock affected by the recent
tornado outbreak and ongoing flooding of the Mississippi River.
In response to the tornado and severe weather outbreak from April 1528, MBAH is working with the American Society for the Prevention of
Cruelty to Animals to move some animals for adoption from the Amory
Humane Society. The Monroe County extension director is also
coordinating volunteers and resources to rebuild fences for livestock.
In response to flooding, the above agencies have provided the
following updates:
 The Natchez Humane Society, HSUS, and United Animal Nations
will open a 300-animal sheltering facility in Natchez for pets of
evacuees. They will start accepting animals on Wednesday.
 The Vicksburg-Warren Humane Society is accepting animals. They
are currently housing chickens, goats, dogs and cats. They are also
involved in local animal search and rescue.
 PAWS is assisting the Vicksburg City Shelter. They have moved all
of the cats and almost all of the dogs. This shelter normally has 4050 animals and is expected to flood. The shelter will be closed this
afternoon until further notice.
 Tunica County pet shelter is not accepting any additional animals at
this time.
TORNADO AND FLOODING UPDATES FOR PET AND ANIMAL OWNERS
•
Mississippi Board of Animal Health: Storm related: Extensive
damage was done to poultry houses and other farm structures on the
east side of the state. The MBAH is consulting with poultry companies
regarding euthanasia and disposal permits. The MBAH is working with
the animal shelter in Monroe County to assess needs and facilitate
requests for resources.
•
River flooding: The MBAH and the MVMA have contacted animal
shelters and veterinary clinics along the Mississippi River from Tunica to
Natchez. These shelters are undertaking preparations to move out
adoptable animals to make room for animals that may be affected by the
flooding. Owner/pet/animal evacuation and sheltering information will be
available on the MBAH website at www.mbah.state.ms.us
•
The MBAH hotline number is 1-888-722-3106. Donations may be made
to the MS Animal Disaster Relief Fund to help animals and their people
affected by these disasters. Information on making a donation or
applying for assistance can be found on the following websites: College
of Veterinary Medicine, www.cvm.msstate.edu and Mississippi
Veterinary Medical Association, www.msvet.org.
ENVIRONMENT
•
Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality: As a result of
flooding forecasts and rising water levels for the Mississippi River, the
Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality advises Mississippians
to think about possible environmental issues that can result if flooding
reaches their homes, farms, and businesses.
•
The release of oil, gasoline, or chemicals into flood waters can be an
environmental hazard.
•
MDEQ requests that if residents observe any releases of oil, gasoline or
chemicals or any stray barrels, waste containers, cylinders and pressure
vessels that they promptly report the discovery to the state's 24-hour
spill line: 800-222-6362 or 601-961-5171.
SITUATION
(LOUISIANA)






FATALITIES:
INJURED:
DESTRUCTION:
UTILITIES:
SHELTERS:
STATE DECLARATION: On April 28, 2011, Governor Bobby
Jindal issued flood warnings and declared a state of
emergency for Louisiana.
 FEDERAL DECLARATIONS The U.S. Department of
Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management
Agency has made funding available to the state of Louisiana
for necessary emergency protective measures for potential
flooding under President Obama’s emergency disaster
declaration
LINKS
Louisiana Health and Hospitals
Department of Public Health
Louisiana Governor's Office
Homeland Security and
Emergency Preparedness
Twitter
Flickr
Facebook
NOAA Weather Radio for LA
http://www.healthy.arkansas.gov/
The Bonnet Carre Spillway, whose job it is to protect New
Orleans, was opened on May 9 and the spillway was
operational as of May 10, 2011.
•
To date, 28 Parishes have declared a Parish State of Emergency: Ascension,
Assumption, Avoyelles, Caldwell, Catahoula, Concordia, East Baton Rouge, East
Carroll, East Feliciana, Evangeline, Franklin, Iberia, Iberville, Lafourche, LaSalle,
Madison, Morehouse, Pointe Coupee, St. Charles, St. James, St. John the Baptist,
St. Landry, St. Martin, St. Mary, Tensas, Terrebonne, West Baton Rouge, and West
Feliciana.
•
All affected State agencies and parishes are taking precautions deemed necessary
to prepare for the impending flood.
•
Six parishes have instituted voluntary evacuations.
•
The Morganza Spillway will be opened, if the threshold reaches a flow rate of 1.5
million cubic feet per second. The current flow rate is 1.36 million cubic feet per
second; threshold could be reached as early as May 14. There are about 2,500
people located inside the Morganza Spillway and 2,000 structures. In the backwater
area, there are about 22,500 people and 11,000 structures that would be impacted
by the spillway opening. Roughly, three days after opening the Morganza Spillway,
the water will reach the Morgan City area and about five days after reaching
Morgan City, the water will begin causing backwater flooding .
http://gohsep.la.gov/
http://twitter.com/#!/GOHSEP
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lagohsep/
http://www.facebook.com/gohsep
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/nwr/Maps/PHP/Louisi
ana.php
National Weather Service Watches,
http://www.weather.gov/alerts-beta/la.php?x=1
Warnings and Advisories
FEDERAL RESPONSE
•
•
Through our regional offices in Atlanta, Ga., Chicago, Ill., Denton,
Texas, and Kansas City, Mo., we remain in close contact and
coordination with our state and local partners in all of the areas
affected by, or potentially impacted by, flooding. And as the crest
moves down the Mississippi River, we will continue to coordinate
closely with officials from the states of Tennessee, Mississippi,
Arkansas, and Louisiana.
At the request of the states, we currently have staff on the ground in
Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri and
Tennessee working with state emergency management partners, to
coordinate federal support. Last week, President Obama declared
emergency declarations for Mississippi, Tennessee and Louisiana,
and a major disaster declaration for Kentucky, allowing the federal
government to support emergency measures to save lives and to
protect property and public health and safety.
In addition to personnel on the ground, we're also sending supplies
to a pre-determined staging area in western Kentucky to ensure the
needed supplies are located close to the affected areas. Here’s a
quick look at the supplies at the staging area so far:





More than 720,000 meals,
More than 460,000 thousand liters of water,
More than 39,000 blankets,
More than 20,000 tarps and
More than 14,000 cots.
MAJOR DISASTER DECLATAIONS
NUMBER
1983
DATE
STATE
05/11
Mississippi
INCIDENT DESCRIPTION
Flooding
1980
05/09
Missouri
Severe Storms, Tornadoes, And
Flooding
1979
05/09
Tennessee
Severe Storms, Tornadoes,
Straight-line Winds, and Flooding
1978
05/09
Tennessee
Severe Storms, Flooding,
Tornadoes, And Straight-Line
Winds
1976
05/04
Kentucky
Severe Storms, Tornadoes, And
Flooding
1975
05/02
Arkansas
Severe Storms, Tornadoes, And
Associated Flooding
1974
05/01
Tennessee
Severe Storms, Tornadoes,
Straight-line Winds, And Associated
Flooding
1973
04/29
Georgia
Severe Storms, Tornadoes,
Straight-line Winds, and Associated
Flooding
1972
04/29
Mississippi
Severe Storms, Tornadoes,
Straight-line Winds, and Associated
Flooding
1971
04/28
Alabama
Severe Storms, Tornadoes,
Straight-line Winds, and Flooding
EMERGENCY DECLARATION
SOURCE: WWW.FEMA.GOV
3322
05/06
Louisiana
Flooding
3321
05/04
Tennessee
Flooding
3320
05/04
Mississippi
Flooding
PREPARING FOR A FLOOD
YOU SHOULD STOCK YOUR HOME WITH SUPPLIES THAT MAY BE
BASIC STEPS
NEEDED DURING THE EMERGENCY PERIOD. AT A MINIMUM, THESE
SUPPLIES SHOULD INCLUDE:

Contact the local county geologist or county planning department to find out if your home is
located in a flash-flood-prone area or landslide-prone area.
 Several clean containers for water, large enough for a 3-5 day supply of water (about five gallons for
each person).

Learn about your community's emergency plans, warning signals, evacuation routes, and
locations of emergency shelters.
 A 3-5 day supply of non-perishable food and a non-electric can opener.

Plan and practice a flood evacuation route with your family. Ask an out-of-state relative or
friend to be the "family contact" in case your family is separated during a flood. Make sure
everyone in your family knows the name, address, and phone number of this contact
person.

Post emergency phone numbers at every phone.

Inform local authorities about any special needs, i.E., Elderly or bedridden people, or anyone
with a disability.

Identify potential home hazards and know how to secure or protect them before the flood
strikes. Be prepared to turn off electrical power when there is standing water, fallen power
lines, or before you evacuation. Turn off gas and water supplies before you evacuate. Secure
structurally unstable building materials.

Buy a fire extinguisher and make sure your family knows where it is and how to use it.

Buy and install sump pumps with back-up power.

Have a licensed electrician raise electric components (switches, sockets, circuit breakers and
wiring) at least 12" above your home's projected flood elevation.

For drains, toilets, and other sewer connections, install backflow valves or plugs to prevent
floodwaters from entering.

Anchor fuel tanks which can contaminate your basement if torn free. An unanchored tank
outside can be swept downstream and damage other houses.
IF YOU ARE UNDER A FLOOD WATCH OR WARNING
 Gather the emergency supplies you previously stocked in your home and stay tuned to local radio
or television station for updates.
 Turn off all utilities at the main power switch and close the main gas valve if evacuation appears
necessary.
 Have your immunization records handy or be aware of your last tetanus shot, in case you should
receive a puncture wound or a wound becomes contaminated during or after the flood.
 Fill bathtubs, sinks and plastic soda bottles with clean water. Sanitize the sinks and tubs first by
using bleach. Rinse and fill with clean water.
 Bring outdoor possessions, such as lawn furniture, grills and trash cans inside or tie them down
securely.
 A first aid kit and manual and prescription medicines and special medical needs.
 A battery-powered radio, flashlights, and extra batteries.
 Water-purifying supplies, such as chlorine or iodine tablets or unscented, ordinary household chlorine
bleach.
 Baby food and/or prepared formula, diapers, and other baby supplies.
 Sleeping bags or extra blankets.
 Disposable cleaning cloths, such as "baby wipes" for the whole family to use in case bathing facilities
are not available.
 Personal hygiene supplies, such as soap, toothpaste, sanitary napkins, etc.
 An emergency kit for your car with food, flares, booster cables, maps, tools, a first aid kit, fire
extinguisher, sleeping bags, etc.
 Rubber boots, sturdy shoes, and waterproof gloves.
 Insect repellent containing DEET or Picaridin, screens, or long-sleeved and long-legged clothing for
protection from mosquitoes which may gather in pooled water remaining after the flood. (More
information about these and other recommended repellents can be found in the fact sheet Updated
Information Regarding Insect Repellents.)
PREPARING FOR A FLOOD
PREPARING TO EVACUATE
IF YOU ARE ORDERED TO EVACUATE

Expect the need to evacuate and prepare for it. When a flood watch is issued, you should:

Fill your vehicle’s gas tank and make sure the emergency kit for your car is ready.
 You should never ignore an evacuation order. Authorities will direct you to leave if you are in a
low-lying area, or within the greatest potential path of the rising waters. If a flood warning is
issued for your area or you are directed by authorities to evacuate the area:

If no vehicle is available, make arrangements with friends or family for transportation.
 Take only essential items with you.

Identify essential documents such as medical records, insurance card along with id cards and
put in water prove material to carry with you during evacuation.
 If you have time, turn off the gas, electricity, and water.
 Disconnect appliances to prevent electrical shock when power is restored.

Fill your clean water containers.
 Follow the designated evacuation routes and expect heavy traffic.

If you have pet, identify a shelter designated for pets.
 Do not attempt to drive or walk across creeks or flooded roads.

Review your emergency plans and supplies, checking to see if any items are missing.

Tune in the radio or television for weather updates.

Listen for disaster sirens and warning signals.

Put livestock and family pets in a safe area. Due to food and sanitation requirements,
emergency shelters cannot accept animals.
 If you are ordered not to evacuate
 To get through the storm in the safest possible manner:

Adjust the thermostat on refrigerators and freezers to the coolest possible temperature.
IF YOU ARE ORDERED NOT TO EVACUATE

To get through the storm in the safest possible manner:

Monitor the radio or television for weather updates.

Prepare to evacuate to a shelter or to a neighbor's home if your home is damaged, or if you are
instructed to do so by emergency personnel.
 Monitor the radio or television for weather updates.
 Prepare to evacuate to a shelter or to a neighbor's home if your home is damaged, or if you are
instructed to do so by emergency personnel.
 Flood recovery, including preventing illness and injury, returning home safely, and clean up.
PREVENT ILLNESS AFTER A DISASTER
PROTECT YOURSELF FROM ANIMAL - AND INSECT-RELATED
HAZARDS

Avoid wild or stray animals and biting or stinging insects.
KEEP FOOD AND WATER SAFE
 Food may not be safe to eat during and after an emergency. Water may not be safe for cooking.

Call local authorities to handle animals.

Get rid of dead animals, according to local guidelines, as soon as you can.

For more information, contact your local animal shelter or services, a veterinarian, or the
humane society for advice on dealing with pets or stray or wild animals after an emergency.

For information on specific animal and insect issues, see protect yourself from animal- and
insect-related hazards after a natural disaster.
 Water may not be safe to drink, clean with, or bathe in after an emergency, such as a hurricane or
flood. During and after a disaster, water can become contaminated with microorganisms (for
example, bacteria), sewage, agricultural or industrial waste, chemicals, and other substances that
can cause illness or death.
 Listen to and follow public announcements. Local authorities will tell you if water is safe to drink or
to use for cooking or bathing. Follow local instructions to use bottled water or to boil or disinfect
water for cooking, cleaning, or bathing.
 For more information, see keep food and water safe after a natural disaster or power outage.
PREVENT CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING
PROTECT MENTAL HEALTH
 Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless gas that can cause sudden illness and death if you
breathe it. Never use generators, pressure washers, grills, camp stoves, or other gasoline, propane,
natural gas, or charcoal-burning devices inside your home, basement, garage, or camper—or even
outside near an open window, door, or vent.
 Seek medical care if you are injured, feel sick, or have acute stress and anxiety.
 Don't heat your house with a gas oven.
 If you are too hot or too cold, or you need to prepare food, don't put yourself and your family at risk
for co poisoning—look to friends, family, or a community shelter for help.
 Seek prompt medical attention if you suspect co poisoning and are feeling dizzy, light-headed, or
nauseated.
 For further guidance on
avoiding UP
co poisoning,
see protect
yourself
from carbon monoxide
CLEAN
SAFELY
AFTER
FLOODS

 Keep as many elements of your normal routine incorporated into the disaster plans as possible,
including activities to calm children's fears.
 Be aware that you may have fewer resources to attend to your day-to-day conflicts, so it is best to
resolve what you can ahead of time.
 If your co detector sounds, leave your home immediately and call 911.

 The days and weeks after an emergency are going to be rough. Some sleeplessness, anxiety, anger,
hyperactivity, mild depression, or lethargy are normal and may go away with time. If you feel any of
these symptoms acutely, seek counseling. Your state, local, tribal health departments will help you
find local resources, including hospitals or health care providers that you may need.
To prevent illness, disinfect and dry buildings and items in them. This will prevent growth of some bacteria, viruses,
mold, and mildew that can cause illness.
 Turn to family, friends, and important social or religious contacts to setup support networks to deal
with the potential stressors.
 Let your child know that it is okay to feel upset when something bad or scary happens. Encourage
your child to express feelings and thoughts, without making judgments.
 For additional resources, see disaster mental health resources.
For more information, see flood water after a disaster or emergency.
WASH YOUR HANDS
 Always wash your hands with soap and boiled or disinfected water before preparing or eating food, after toilet use, after participating in cleanup activities, and
after handling articles contaminated by floodwater or sewage. Use warm water when available. Wash children's hands frequently (always before meals).
 Disinfect water for washing by mixing 1/8 teaspoon of household bleach per 1 gallon of water). Let it stand for 30 minutes. If the water is cloudy, use a solution of
1/4 teaspoon of household bleach per 1 gallon of water.
 If water isn't available, use alcohol-based products made for washing hands.
 For more tips on washing your hands, see hand hygiene after a disaster.
PREVENT ILLNESS AFTER A DISASTER
PREVENT OR TREAT WOUNDS
AVOID MOSQUITOES
 Rain and flooding in a hurricane area may lead to an increase in mosquitoes, which can carry
diseases like west nile virus. In most cases, the mosquitoes will be pests but will not carry
communicable diseases.
 To protect yourself from mosquitoes, use screens on dwellings, and wear long pants, socks, and
long-sleeved shirts and use insect repellents that contain deet or picaridin. Care must be taken
when using DEET on small children. More information about these and other recommended
repellents can be found in the fact sheet updated information regarding insect repellents.
 To control mosquito populations, drain all standing water left in open containers, such as flower
pots, tires, pet dishes, or buckets, outside your home.
PREVENT ILLNESS FROM SEWAGE
 If there is flooding along with a hurricane, the waters may contain fecal material from overflowing
sewage systems and agricultural and industrial waste. Although skin contact with floodwater does
not, by itself, pose a serious health risk, there is risk of disease from eating or drinking anything
contaminated with floodwater.
 If there has been a backflow of sewage into your house, wear rubber boots and waterproof gloves
during cleanup. Remove and discard contaminated household materials that cannot be disinfected,
such as wall coverings, cloth, rugs, and drywall.
 Immediately clean out all open wounds and cuts with soap and clean water. Keep wounds covered
with clean, dry bandages that are large enough to cover the wound and contain any pus or
drainage.
 Change bandages as needed and when drainage can be seen through the bandage. Contact a
doctor to find out whether more treatment is needed (such as a tetanus shot).
 If a wound gets red, swells, or drains, seek immediate medical attention.
AVOID WILD OR STRAY ANIMALS

If you are bitten by any animal, seek immediate medical attention. If you are bitten by a snake, try
to identify it, so that if it is poisonous, you can be given the correct anti-venom.

Do not cut the wound or attempt to suck the venom out. (See also the CDC rabies website, rat-bite
fever: frequently asked questions, and medical problems and treatment considerations for the red
imported fire ant [PDF, 658 KB/8 pages].)
CONTACT WITH HAZARDOUS MATERIAL
 If your skin or eyes may have come in contact with hazardous materials, such as acid from a car
battery, wash thoroughly with decontaminated water and seek medical attention as needed.
TETANUS IMMUNIZATION
 If you have any open cuts or sores that will be exposed to floodwater, keep them as clean as
possible by washing them with soap and applying an antibiotic ointment to discourage infection.
 If you have wounds, you should be evaluated for a tetanus immunization, just as you would at any
other time of injury.
 Wash clothes contaminated with flood or sewage water in hot water and detergent and separately
from uncontaminated clothes and linens.
 If you receive a puncture wound or a wound contaminated with feces, soil, or saliva, have a doctor
or health department determine whether a tetanus booster is necessary based on individual
records.
 Do not allow children to play in floodwater areas and do not allow children to play with floodwatercontaminated toys that have not been disinfected. Disinfect toys by using a solution of one cup of
bleach in five gallons of water. Some toys, such as stuffed animals and baby toys, cannot be
disinfected; they should be discarded.
PREVENT TEMPERATURE-RELATED ILLNESS
When standing or working in water that is
cooler than 75 f (24°c):
 Wear rubber boots.
 Ensure that clothing and boots have
adequate insulation.
 Take frequent breaks out of the water.
 Change into dry clothing when possible.
Prevent heat–related illness:
 Stay in air-conditioned buildings.
 Take breaks in shaded areas or in cool rooms.
 Drink water and nonalcoholic fluids often.
 Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing.
 Do outdoor activities during cooler hours.
For further guidance, visit the cdc extreme heat website.
For further guidance e, see emergency wound care after a natural disaster.
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
 Short bouts of diarrhea and upset stomach and colds or other breathing diseases sometimes occur in
developed countries, such as the united states, after a natural disaster, particularly among large
groups of people in a shelter. Basic hygiene measures like frequent hand washing or use of an alcohol
hand gel, especially after using the restroom or changing diapers and before eating, can help prevent
these diseases.
 Diseases like cholera or typhoid are rare in developed countries and do not typically occur after a
natural disaster.
 For information on infectious disease, see infectious disease after a disaster.
IMMUNIZATIONS
For information on immunizations for evacuees, relief workers, emergency responders and travelers, see
immunization after a natural disaster.

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