Development Plans - Manitoba Reading Association

Report
DEVELOPING,
IMPLEMENTING, AND
MONITORING A LITERACY
ACTION PLAN
Judith Irvin
Objectives for the Day
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Understand the Taking Action Literacy Leadership
Model
Consider the needs of struggling readers in content
area classes
Work through the five-stage Taking Action Literacy
Leadership Process
Understand the use of the two books as a resource
Reflect on what is possible at your school
Definitions of Literacy
1600 –1900
Ability to sign one’s name to a document
and own or borrow books
1930
Functional Literacy – moved to grade
equivalents – 3+ years of schooling
WWII
4+ years of schooling
1952
6+ years of schooling
1960
8+ years of schooling
Late 1970s
High school completion
Toto, We’re Not in Kansas Anymore!
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Context has changed
 Media
and technology
 New ways of communicating
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New demands in the 21st Century
 New
kinds of jobs demanding new kinds of literacy
 High level of reading required in even entry-level jobs
Literacy for the 21st Century
Abilities required for student success:
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Ability to seek information and make critical
judgments about information
Ability to read and interpret many different kinds of
text both in print and online
Ability to innovate and apply knowledge creatively
Where Literacy is Headed, Kent Williams,
NCTE Executive Director, September, 2008
What is NLP?
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Non-profit dedicated to
improving literacy among middle and high school
students
Started in 2000 and worked in numerous schools
and districts across the country
Have been working on a process for working with
schools on developing a literacy plan for almost a
decade
We are not a program.
Large, Urban District in Florida
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4 high needs high schools; 2 high needs middle
schools
3 schools on “Differentiated Accountability” which
means we have the opportunity to coordinate our
efforts with State of Florida personnel
One NLP Partner per school; two content specialists
(math and science); one evaluator
District budget to support NLP: substitutes, some
stipends, copywork, district personnel
Model
Components
www.ascd.org
International Reading Association
www.reading.org
:
Study guide for vignettes
Tools are all online
You don’t have to be sick to get better!!
Circle of Concern
Circle of
Influence
Covey, Stephen (1989). The 7
Habits of Highly Effective
People. NY: Simon &
Schuster, Inc.
The teacher cannot do it alone – the
school makes all the difference
“An excellent teacher without a well-coordinated
program can do only so much. In these situations,
even the best of teachers can offer students only
isolated moments of engrossed learning and rich
experience in an otherwise disconnected series of
classes.”
Langer, J. (2002). Effective Literacy Instruction:
Building Successful Reading and Writing Programs. Urbana, IL:
NCTE.
Think about all the things that your students
read outside of school
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email
magazines
blogs
song lyrics
instructions for video
games
CD covers
Twitter
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movie titles
text messages
notes from friends
comic books
cereal boxes
T-shirts
the driver’s manual
Facebook
Student Motivation,
Engagement and Achievement
What motivates you?
The Literacy Engagement
and Instruction Cycle
Engage students
in literacy tasks that
are meaningful
and purposeful.
Provide instruction,
modeling, and guided
practice of literacy support
strategies in context
Improve student confidence,
competence, and efficacy
Prior Knowledge
Prior knowledge is
highly personal depending
on our experience and
culture.
Is Argentina as big as Tallahassee?
Learning Theory
Schema
Prior knowledge
Metacognition
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Instruction must reflect
an understanding of
learning theory.
Integrating Literacy and Learning:
Across the Content Areas
ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTION:
Not
“Everyone a reading teacher”
but
“How will students become better readers, writers,
speakers and thinkers of this content (math, science,
social studies, music, business) as a result of being in
your class??”
Creating a
Literacy-Rich Environment
What is in the physical environment that
communicates that this school is a
reading/writing/thinking community?
Literacy related school-wide activities
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Adult models of reading and writing
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Posted student work
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Classroom libraries
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Reading Time
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Read Aloud program
Structures and policies that support literacy
Parents and
Community Members
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Parents must understand their role and ways to
help their children and the school effort
to improve literacy.
 Community members can provide
positive role models for literacy as well
as provide other means of support.
School District
Beyond the managerial role –
 Instructional leadership professional development
 Collect and analyze data; make available to
schools
 Support school-based coaching
 Curriculum alignment
How do districts support schools?
How do schools get what they need from districts?
The goal of quality content literacy
instruction…
…is to improve students’
content learning and
literacy development
(progress as a reader,
writer, listener/viewer,
speaker/presenter, and
critical and creative
thinker) at the same time.
Five Modes of Instruction
Page 81-82 from MtC Book
The Process
Get
Ready
Sustain
Implement
Assess
Plan
A Literacy Leadership Team
hard at work
Sometimes you need to
…
 revitalize your team
 shift membership
 show administrative
support
 provide incentives
 find time to meet
Is your literacy leadership team representative of the
entire school community?
Establish Ground Rules
If your school
was “literacy-rich”…
What would students be doing?
 What would teachers be doing?
 What would the environment in the
classroom be like?
 What would the environment in the school
be like?
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A Literacy-Rich School
Read the vignette in Taking Action on
Adolescent Literacy (p. 222)
 Underline the structures, policies, and
processes in the school that have been put
into place to create this literacy-rich
environment.
 Chat about your observations with a
neighbor.
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Data-based key messages
Although…
We still need to work
on…
We could do this by…
Reading scores are
above the state
average
• Providing interventions
for students not
meeting the standard
• Raising the bar for
boys
•Working on improving
nonfiction
comprehension
•Using Soar to Success
instead of study hall with
students not meeting the
standards
•Improving student
engagement through
more choice in reading
and writing assignments
•Reading more
nonfiction in all language
arts classes
•Using literacy support
strategies in all science
and social studies classes
The Process
Get
Ready
Sustain
Implement
Assess
Plan
Circle Map: The Strengths of Your School (individual
maps)
[strengths]
School
Name
What built or contributed to the strengths?
Establishing the Need
for a Literacy Improvement Effort
Although ______________
(something good), we still need
to work on __________.
Data Sentence Frame
Stage 2: Assess
The Rubrics
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Student Motivation, Engagement, and Achievement
Literacy across the Content Areas (TtL Book p. 24+)
Literacy-Rich Environment
Literacy Interventions
Parents and Community
District
Read and Clarify the rubrics
Literacy Across the Content Areas Rubric
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Individually rank your perception of the literacy
implementation of your school or department on each
indicator. There are four levels of indicators:
Cite evidence for your rating – examples, stories, what
you notice around the school
Using the Rubrics
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Respond individually by placing a check mark in the
box that best describes your perception of your
school
Transfer individual checks to a group grid
Discuss and try to reach consensus
Place a dot on the grid to indicate consensus
Summarize ah-hahs
Identify School Needs
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Re-examine the rubric charts
Look for items that are important to the team but
have low implementation at your school (1 or 2)
Identify and chart 3-5 needs that you (individually)
want to focus on
Needs Chart
Needs
Rating
Stage 2: Assess
Goals
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Revisit your identified needs
Turn your needs into goals
Construct clear goal statements
Develop a plan for faculty feedback
Guidelines for Goals
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Choose goals you can meet and measure
Choose goals that will make a difference for kids
Don’t choose too many goals
Revisit these goals during the
year to determine progress and
set future goals
Remember: You can’t do it all in one year!
The Process
Get
Ready
Sustain
Implement
Assess
Plan
Create an Implementation Map for
Each Goal
Components of the Implementation Map (TtL p. 72-3)
 Action Step
 Timeline
 Lead Person(s)
 Resources Needed
 Specifics of Implementation
 Measure(s) of Success
Solicit Feedback
from Total School Community
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Department Meetings to get
feedback on
Goals
The
Action Plan
Targeted Strategies
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Revise based on faculty feedback
Publish the Literacy Action Plan
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Literacy is our focus – 21st century skills and data of
our school
Literacy team members and process for developing
goals
Literacy action goals
Implementation maps
Activities for the year
Ta- dah – we love literacy!!
The Process
Get Ready
Sustain
Implement
Assess
Plan
Categories of Strategies
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Building and Activating Prior Knowledge
– PAS
Questioning
– QAR
Taking Notes
– Cornell (two column) Notes
Organizing Information
– Graphic Organizers
– One Sentence Summary Frames
– Quick Writes
Vocabulary
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Morphemic Analysis
Frayer Model
How Well Do I Know These Words?
Why These Strategies?
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Research-based
Applicable to any content area
Student-centered, student-owned, and studentcontrolled
Versatile enough to be used for introductory skills
and high order thinking
Setting the Year’s Agenda
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Calendar considerations
Faculty professional development
Team meetings
Demonstration Classrooms
Literacy Showcase
Involving the Total School Community
Potential Activities for Faculty Kickoff
Involve faculty in vision activities
Present plan and gather feedback
Involve faculty and students in
branding the initiative
Give lots of opportunity for involvement
Cross content literacy demands
Students need to strategically read, write, speak/listen,
present, and think across content areas (however these may
need to be applied in different ways to each discipline of
study).
Examples: Activating prior knowledge, setting purpose for
reading, clarifying, questioning, predicting, summarizing,
visualizing, deductive and inductive thinking, brainstorming,
responding
Within content literacy demands
Specific ways of reading, writing, speaking/listening,
presenting, and thinking within each discipline of
study or more applicable to some disciplines as
opposed to others.
Examples: Rules of evidence, text types and structures,
presentation formats, conceptual vocabulary,
technical vocabulary
Monitor Progress toward Goals
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Walk-throughs to gather and report data
Classroom observations
Student focus groups to see if they know and use
the strategies
Faculty surveys and feedback in small groups such
as departments and teams
The Process
Get
Ready
Sustain
Implement
Assess
Plan
Plus/Delta
for the Literacy Project
Conditions for Success
A contact person who “owns” the project at
each school
 Strong administrative support
 Strong district support
 Commitment to meet and move the agenda
forward between NLP visits
 Time for literacy team to meet
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I HAVE HEARD ONE OR
TWO TEACHERS SAY…”IT
IS NOT MY JOB TO TEACH
READING.”
Here is my answer to them.
Literacy is not something to put
on an already crowded plate…
Literacy IS the plate!
I HAVE HEARD ONE OR
TWO TEACHERS SAY…”IT
IS NOT MY JOB TO TEACH
READING.”
Here is another answer to them.

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