Stormwater

Report
Sustainable Stormwater
management
International cases
Lars Rydén
The Baltic University Programme
Centre for Sustainable Development
Uppsala University
Stormwater
Stormwater is water that originates from
precipitation events and snow/ice melt
Stormwater can
- run into the sewage system
- soak into the soil
- be held on the surface and evaporate
- run off and end up in nearby streams
Urban runoff entering a storm drain
in Kharkiv. Early spring
SWITCH
Sustainable water management
in the city of the future
www.switchurbanwater.eu
• protection of the hydrological cycle
• landscape aesthetics
• integration with neighbouring land
• correctness of design
• environmentally: habitat integrity, biodiversity
The SWITCH project
• Cities in four continents and at various stages of development
• All aspects of the water cycle – water, wastewater, stormwater and
natural systems
• A wide range of climatic, socio-economic and institutional situations
• Social, economic and environmental perspectives
• Scales ranging from household to city levels
• Water as part of urban planning and the built environment
• From the present time to the 'City of the Future'
Water in the City
Sustainable Development
Applications Series
Edited by
Tomasz Bergier, AGH University of Science and Technology
Jakub Kronenberg, University of Lodz
Iwona Wagner, University of Lodz, ERCE u/a UNESCO PAS
Published by
The Sendzimir Foundation
www.sendzimir.org.pl
http://www.sendzimir.org.pl/images/zrz-5-en/ZRZ5_web.pdf
Sustainability Challenges
for stormwater managment
• To be able to take care of a large volume of water during floods
• To reduce pollution of the receiving water
• To take care of water as a resource
• To promote biodiversity
• To increase the beauty and functionality of the urbanscape
Pervious pavements,
asphalt and grass pavers
Large surfaces devoid of greenery,
such as parking lots, roads and
sidewalks cause the most trouble
in terms of uncontrolled surface
runoff. Green infrastructure
is often impossible to apply.
It is possible to use materials that
allow water to infiltrate, i.e.
pervious paving and asphalt.
Infiltration basin and footbridge in
Aiken, USA
Vegetated buffer
strips
Vegetated grass buffer strips are a
good solution in areas with looser
development, especially near
roads.
These slightly inclined vegetated
surfaces allow the slow (horizontal and
lateral) flow of stormwater from
adjacent land
Infiltration basin and footbridge in
Aiken, USA
Curb indentations
Curb indentations channel water,
allowing it to flow from the streets and
sidewalks.
Runoff water flowing down NE Siskiyou
street in Portland, Oregon, USA
Detention basins
Detention basin used for recreation
during dry weather can collect
water from the streets and parking
lot.
Grangetown , Wales, UK
SuDS Wales
Sustainable Drainage Systems
Infiltration ditches
and
grass ditches
Grass ditch along tramway tracks
in the city centre of Freiburg, Germany.
Dry
detention
pond
Benthemplein
water square in
Rotterdam, the
Netherlands.
Photo during dry
weather. Can
accommodate
nearly 2 million
litres of water
during rain.
Sedimentation –
biofiltration system
pilot project in the
Sokolowka river in
Lodz, Poland
A large stormwater wetland in
Massachusetts, USA
Buffer zone with
biogeochemical barrier
for the pre-treatment of water conveyed
directly to the reservoir
schematic representation and pilot project in
the ponds of Arturowek in Lodz, Poland
Sustainable
Stormwater
System
Augustenborg,
Malmö Sweden,
1998–2014
Sidewalk
Garden
Project
San Francisco, USA,
Established in May
2013
Human–
Nature–
Technology
Sustainable
stormwater
management
Kronsberg, Hanover
Germany, concept –
1992, beginning of
construction – 1997
Children are playing by the “bächle” in Freiburg, Germany.
The “bächle” are small open water channels that
follow the streets downhill to the river.
Conclusions
1. Acknowledge the importance of water as a natural system that provides
a range of benefits (ecosystem services) to the city; a shift in the
perception from the need to desiccate the city and perceiving water as a
threat to the benefits of increasing the presence of water in a controlled
way and seeing water as a resource.
2. Accept the presence of water in the city and design space for it; use
technical solutions that enhance stormwater infiltration and retention in
the urban drainage basin, and its treatment.
3. Allow the use of best practices in stormwater management alone or in
combination with traditional methods (combined or stormwater sewer
systems).

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