Core Content Coaching Social Studies Grade 7

Report
3rd 6 Weeks
Texas History Unit 3 Arcs 1
&2
Austin Independent
School District
Core Content Coaching
Social Studies
Grade 7
The teacher …
“A child miseducated is a child
lost." – John F. Kennedy
Bring to your Meeting….
•
School Calendar/Yearly Itinerary (YI)
•
Curriculum Road Map (CRM)
•
TEKS/ELPS/CCRS
Adopted Text Book, Glencoe, Texas and Texans, The Texas Portal Lesson on
causes and events leading to the Texas Revolution, Path to the Revolution,
Lorenzo de Zavala
•
A resource for quality texts, school library, literacy center, books from
the library that relate to the TEKS being studied and for teacher readaloud
•
The Handbook of Texas online: Convention of 1836, Texas Events in
1836, George C. Childress, Juan Nepomuceno Sequín, James Fannin,
Sam Houston, Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, William B. Travis,
Lorenze de Zavala
•
Teacher Read-Aloud Ask your school librarian for a suitable historical
fiction or memoir to read to the students about Texas life during the
Revolutionary period.
•
A resource for higher order question stems make a copy to have
•
Lesson plan template
•
A copy of Probing Questions make a copy to have
When you click the link above, it does open, but you have to close the ppt. to
get to the article. Then restart the ppt. from the this current slide. Make copies
of each before going over the PowerPoint.
Yearly Itinerary…Look at the Content, Pacing, SCA for Unit 1
Grading Period
Assessment
3rd 6 weeks
25 days
(12.5 Block days)
Pacing Guide
Conflict and Change: The
Texas Revolution
Unit 1: Causes of the Texas
Revolution
Assessment:
SCA 1
Dates: December 13 19, 2012
Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills
*Readiness and supporting standards are not designated for this grade level.
Estimated time frame: 5 days
(2.5 block days)
TEKS: 7.1A, 7.1B, 7.1C, 7.2D,
7.2F, 7.3A, 7.3B, 7.13A,
7.17A
Unit 2: Texas Declaration of
Independence
TEKS eligible for testing:
7.1A, 7.1C, 7.2D, 7.3A,
Estimated time frame: 6 days
7.3B, 7.9C, 7.17A,
(3 block days)
TEKS: 7.1C, 7.3A, 7.3B, 8.4C,
8.15C
Unit 3: The Texas Revolution
Estimated time frame:
14 days (7 block days)
TEKS: 7.1A, 7.1B, 7.1C, 7.3B,
7.3C, 7.3D, 7.8A, 7.8B, 7.9A,
7.9C, 7.17C
7.1: Traditional historical points of reference in Texas history.
7.1A: identify the major eras in Texas history, describe their defining characteristics, & explain why historians divide the past into
eras, including ...; Revolution & Republic; ...
7.1B: apply absolute & relative chronology through the sequencing of significant individuals, events, & time periods
7.1C: explain the significance of the following dates: ... 1836, Texas independence...
7.2: How individuals, events, & issues through the Mexican National Era shaped the history of Texas
7.2D: identify the individuals, issues, & events related to Mexico becoming an independent nation & its impact on Texas, ...
the Mexican federal Constitution of 1824, the merger of Texas & Coahuila as a state, the State Colonization Law of 1825, & slavery
7.2F: contrast Spanish, Mexican, &Anglo purposes for & methods of settlement in Texas
7.3: How individuals, events, & issues related to the Texas Revolution shaped the history of Texas
7.3A: trace the development of events that led to the Texas Revolution, including the Fredonian Rebellion, the Mier y Terán
Report, the Law of April 6, 1830, the Turtle Bayou Resolutions, & the arrest of Stephen F. Austin
7.3B: explain the roles played by significant individuals during the Texas Revolution, including George Childress, Lorenzo de Zavala,
James Fannin, Sam Houston, Antonio López de Santa Anna, Juan N. Seguín, & William B. Travis
7.3C: explain the issues surrounding significant events of the Texas Revolution, including the Battle of Gonzales, William B. Travis's
letter "To the People of Texas & All Americans in the World," the siege of the Alamo & all the heroic defenders who
gave their lives there, the Constitutional Convention of 1836, Fannin's surrender at Goliad, & the Battle of San Jacinto
7.3D: explain how the establishment of the Republic of Texas brought civil, political, and religious freedom to Texas
7.8: Uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, & interpret data
7.8A: create & interpret thematic maps, graphs, charts, models, & databases representing various aspects of Texas during the 19 th
... century
7.8B: analyze & interpret geographic distributions & patterns in Texas during the 19th ... century
7.9: Understands the location & characteristics of places & regions of Texas
7.9A: locate ... places of importance in Texas during the 19th ... century such as major cities, rivers, natural & historic landmarks,
political & cultural regions, & local points of interest
7.9C: understands the effects of the interaction between humans & the environment in Texas during the 19th ... century
7.13: Interdependence of the Texas economy with the United States & the world
7.13A: analyze the impact of national & international markets & events on the production of goods & services in Texas
such as agriculture ...
7.17: Importance of the expression of different points of view in a democratic society
7.17A: identify different points of view of political parties and interest groups on important Texas issues, past and
present
7.17C: express & defend a point of view on an issue of historical or contemporary interest in Texas
8.4: History. The student understands significant political and economic issues of the revolutionary era.
8.4C: explain the issues surrounding important events of the American Revolution, including declaring independence;
writing the Articles of Confederation; fighting the battles of Lexington, Concord, Saratoga, and Yorktown; enduring the
winter at Valley Forge; and signing the Treaty of Paris 1783 RC1
8.15 Government. The student understands the American beliefs and principles reflected in the Declaration of
Independence, the U.S. Constitution, and other important historic documents.
8.15: Government. The student understands the American beliefs and principles reflected in the Declaration of
Independence, the U.S. Constitution, and other important historic documents.
8.15C: identify colonial grievances listed in the Declaration of Independence and explain how those grievances were
addressed in the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights RC3
*Social Studies Skills should be taught in conjunction with the Content TEKS; therefore, they are embedded throughout
the year.
Yearly
Itinerary
information
should be
used along
with school
event
calendar
information
to get an
accurate
picture of
available
instructional
time.
Check Unit 3 for
the TEKS you will
be teaching.
Review CRM for Concept, Transfer, Enduring Understandings, Essential Questions,
Units, Vocabulary, and Arcs, Resources, Time Pacing …
© Austin Independent School District, 2012
Create questions
to spark interest,
conversations to
get your students
thinking, to help
students make
connections.
Course: Grade 7 Social Studies
Austin ISD Curriculum Road Map (CRM)
Grading Period: 3 rd 6 Weeks
Name: Conflict and Change- The Texas Revolution
Pacing

25 days (12.5 Block Days)

November 13- December 20, 2012
DESIRED RESULTS
Making Meaning
Transfer: Students will be able to independently use the learning to compare and contrast the reasons why nations seek
independence.
Enduring Understandings: Conflict between groups occurs when
Essential Questions:
cultural values differ.

How do political events contribute to cultural
When do different cultural values among people cause conflict?
conflict?
When do different cultural values among people not cause

How do people justify rebellion?
conflict?

How do perceptions of historical conflicts
When in Texas history do we see different cultural values that
change over time?
caused conflict?

How do conflicts affect all aspects of a society?
Do different cultural values always cause conflict?
Unit 3: The Texas Revolution
Supporting vocabulary link
Essential Vocabulary siege, republic, turning point,
bombardment, garrison, rebellion, justify, annex, treason,
decree, massacre, skirmish, impact, civilian
Student pre-requisite knowledge
Students need to understand the causes of the Texas Revolution.
Resources: Glencoe, Texas and Texans, Chapters 9-11; Portal to Texas History
ELPS: Mandated by Texas Administrative Code (19 TAC §74.4), click on the link for English Language Proficiency
Standards (ELPS) to support English Language Learners.
ARC 1: Military Events of the Texas Revolution
Arc Pacing: 12 Days (6 Block Days)
Targeted Vocabulary: siege, republic, turning point, bombardment, garrison, rebellion, justify, annex, treason,
decree, massacre, skirmish
Resources: Glencoe, Texas and Texans, Chapters 9-11; Portal to Texas History
You have the
Essential Questions
which students
should be able to
answer in depth at
the end of the lesson.
You also have
questions to spark
conversation that
lead student thinking
to the answers to the
Essential Questions.
•
•
Look at the TEKS being taught for the lesson, what students will need to
know and be expected to do.....
Look at the verbs, words, phrases....
•
•
•
•
•
What TEKS are going to be addressed during this lesson?
Which TEKS have been taught before?
How can you connect these previously taught TEKS to the new learning?
What academic vocabulary do students need to understand and use?
What words, phrases in the TEKS may not be understood by the students?
•
What probing question(s) will facilitate understanding and mastery?
(Use your question lists from slide 2 to formulate some questions you can use with your
students.)
Texas History
has a lot of
events in 1836.
Use The
Handbook of
Texas Online.
TEKS Knowledge & Skills
Readiness and Supporting Standards are not
designated at this level.
Acquisition
Students Will Know
Students Will Be Able To
Make a list of
words phrases in
the TEKS that
your students
might not
understand, be
familiar with, etc.
7.1 History. The student understands traditional historical points of reference in Texas history.
7.1C explain the significance of the

The significance of 1836 to

Students will write a
following dates… 1836, Texas
Texas history.
paragraph to explain the
independence…
significance of 1836 using the
Students should be able to
explain the meaning of the
TEKS and make connections
to the new learning.
sentence stem, “1836 was an
important year in Texas history
because….”
When TEKS are repeated, still review
for comprehension. You will be confirming
students’ understanding and vocabulary
development.
Make sure
students take
notes on what
you want them
to include in
their paragraph
about the
significance of
1836 during the
lesson.
•
•
Look at the TEKS being taught for the lesson, what students will need to know and be
expected to do.....
Look at the verbs, words, phrases….
• What TEKS are going to be addressed during this lesson?
• What academic vocabulary do students need to understand and use?
• What words, phrases in the TEKS may not be understood by the students?
• What guiding question(s) will facilitate understanding and mastery?
TEKS Knowledge & Skills
Acquisition
Students Will Know
Readiness and Supporting Standards are not
designated at this level.
Students Will Be Able To
7.3 History. The student understands how individuals, events, and issues related to the Texas Revolution shaped the history of Texas
Keep all TEKs
being studied
posted for
students to
see. Make a
list of what
needs to be
learned. As
students
come to the
content they
need, stop
and let them
take notes
on a graphic
organizer.
Use the
graphic
organizers in
the textbook
for chapters
9, 10, & 11.
7.3B explain the roles played by
significant individuals during the Texas
Revolution, including George Childress,
Lorenzo de Zavala, James Fannin, Sam
Houston, Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna,
Juan N. Seguin, and William B. Travis


Significant individuals listed in
TEKS 7.3B played a role in the
Texas Revolution.
Events and issues listed in TEKS
7.3C were important to the
Texas Revolution.


Identify major battles and events of the
Texas Revolution on a graphic organizer.
Explain the roles of important figures in
the Texas Revolution by creating a
memorial for one of the individuals listed
in TEKS 7.3B.
7.3C explain the issues surrounding
significant events of the Texas Revolution,
including the Battle of Gonzales, William B.
Travis’s letter “To the People of Texas and
All Americans in the World,” the siege of
the Alamo and all the heroic defender who
gave their lives there, the Constitutional
Convention of 1836, Fannin’s surrender at
Goliad, and the Battle of San Jacinto
7.8 Geography. The student uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data.
7.8A create and interpret thematic maps, 
There are various ways to

graphs, charts, models, and databases
create and interpret maps,
representing various aspects of Texas
graphs, models, and databases
during the 19th… century
about the Texas Revolution.


Interpret
and
explain
the
7.8B analyze and interpret geographic
significance of geographic
distributions and patterns in Texas during
th
distributions and patterns in
the 19 …century
Texas during the Texas
Revolution.
Create and interpret thematic maps
showing major battles of the Texas
Revolution.
After analyzing models, charts, and
databases related the Texas Revolution,
explain the significance of geographic
distributions and patterns in Texas during
the Texas Revolution.
Continue the list of
words phrases in the
TEKS that your
students might not
understand, be
familiar with, etc.
Look at the verbs
the phrases, and
the content on
this slide in the
TEKS. Discuss
how you will
teach the lesson
for students’
mastery.
More TEKS
TEKS Knowledge & Skills
Acquisition
Students Will Know
Readiness and Supporting Standards are not
designated at this level.
Students Will Be Able To
7.9 Geography. The student understands the location and characteristics of places and regions of Texas.
7.9A locate the Mountains and Basins,
Great Plains, North Central Plains, and
Coastal Plains regions and places of
importance in Texas during the 19th
…century such as major cities, rivers,
natural and historic landmarks, political
and cultural regions, and local points of
interest


The absolute and relative
location of places and regions
of importance during the Texas
Revolution.
Physical and human factors
impacted events during the
Texas Revolution.


Identify places and regions of
importance during the Texas
Revolution on a map.
In a small group, discuss the
impact of physical and human
factors on events during the
Texas Revolution.
7.9C analyze effects of physical and
human factors such as climate, weather,
landforms, irrigation, transportation and
communication on major events in Texas
7.17 Citizenship. The student understands the importance of the expression of different points of view in a democratic
society.
7.17C express and defend a point of view 
There are many ways to

Write an editorial expressing
on an issue of historical or contemporary
express and defend their point
and defending a point of view
importance
of view on a event or issue of
about an issue or event of the
the Texas Revolution.
Texas Revolution.
What maps will you be using?
Suggested Homework/Activities: Chapter 9
Activity Workbook: pp. 17-18
Reading Essentials and Study Guide: pp. 105-116
Review
absolute and
relative
location with
students.
What does
physical and
human factors in
TEKS 7.9C
mean?
Remember: have your students take notes on
content they will need to write a newspaper
article on a battle or event in the Texas
Revolution. (See Performance Tasks.)
Assessment Evidence & Model
Lesson
ASSESSMENT EVIDENCE
Student Work Products/Assessment Evidence
Performance Tasks
Other Evidence (i.e. unit tests, open ended exams, quiz,
essay, student work samples, observations, etc.)

Dawn
At the
Alamo
readings
Write a newspaper article about one of the major
battles or events of the Texas Revolution listed in
TEKS 7.3C and explain how physical and human
factors impacted the issue/event selected.

Analyze primary and secondary sources related to the
painting, Dawn at the Alamo and identify bias toward
the Texians and against the Mexicans.
History Through Art, Texas and Texans, Dawn at the
Alamo, p. 233. Picture and reading
Other pictures of the battle
Do you see bias? Justify your answer.
Short Cycle Assessment

SCA Testing Window: December 13-19, 2012

SEs eligible for testing include, but are not limited to:
7.3B, 7.3C, 7.9C
Additional Suggestions for Assessment

Teacher observations

Graphic organizer listing events of the Texas
Revolution, a description of the event, and its
impact
Go the Social Studies
Website linked below
and look at
the lessons. Will you
have to add to them
for students to be
prepared to complete
the Performance
Tasks?
LESSON PLANNING TOOLS
In the course of lesson planning, it is the expectation that teachers will include whole child considerations when
planning such as differentiation, special education, English language learning, dual language, gifted and talented, social
emotional learning, physical activity, and wellness.
Model Lesson- The Alamo- What were they thinking?
You can use The DBQ Project:
Suggested Pacing: 3 days (1.5 Block Day)
Remembering the Alamo: A
TEKS: 7.1C, 7.3B, 7.3C, 7.17C, 7.21A, 7.21B
Instructional Resource: PENDING
See Social
Studies
website for
lessons.
Personal Journal
Includes reading, writing, analysis of
primary sources.
Some interesting readings on the Alamo:
•Handbook of Texas Online: Alamo, Battle of
•Handbook of Texas Online: Alamo
•Handbook of Texas Online: Alamo Noncombatants
Can you use some of
these readings for
homework? Read like
a historian. What is
important to know?
Become an expert!
See The Texas
Portal lessons
for Remember
the Alamo. It
also has a
PowerPoint.
TEKS: Look at the TEKS verb, words, phrases…
• Do you understand what students need to master?
• Do you understand what the TEKS expect the students to learn?
• How will you teach/review the vocabulary and phrases related to the
TEKS to the students ?
• How will you teach/review the TEKS with the students?
• How will your lesson reflect the mastery of the TEKS being studied?
• Do the students understand what they need to master?
• Can students identify the verbs in the TEKS?
• How will you connect previously taught TEKS to the new learning?
• How will you know when the student has accomplished/
demonstrated mastery of the TEKS being studied?
• How will the student know she/he has mastered the TEKS?
PLEASE NOTE that at first these strategies may seem very labor intensive, but as your
students develop their background knowledge and academic vocabulary, these
procedures will go faster because you have laid the foundation and the result will be
that the students know and understand the meanings of most of the words and
phrases in the TEKS. Do not neglect reviewing the TEKS. At the end of your lesson,
your students should be able to connect the new learning to the TEKS being taught
and see relationships to prior learning.
ARC 2: The Social Impact of the Texas Revolution
Follow the same procedures with the TEKS, Students Will Know, Students Will
Be Able to…as you did in ARC 1.
Read the “Students Will Know…
and the Students Will Be Able
to…”
Do these sections reflect what is in
the TEKS?
How will your teaching reflect these
sections?
o
oral language strategies
o
written response strategies
o
questioning strategies
o
collaborative learning
strategies
Suggested Anchors of Support:
•
Timeline: Texas & Texas,
Chapter 11, pp. 244-263
•
Use graphic organizers
suggested in the text or
p.245,246, 252, 259, 260 or
determined by the teacher to
support student learning.
•
Primary source Critical
Thinking Skills: Use the
pictures in the textbook,
Picturing History to tell a
story, pp. 247, 249, 252, 255,
256
•
Graphic Analysis 1 for ART
•
Graphic Analysis 2 for ART
•
Graphic Analysis for
photograph
ARC 2: The Social Impact of the Texas Revolution
Targeted Vocabulary: impact, civilian
Resources: Glencoe, Texas and Texans, Chapter 11
TEKS Knowledge & Skills
Readiness and Supporting Standards are not
designated for this level.
Arc Pacing: 2 Days (1 Block Day)
Acquisition
Students Will Know
Students Will Be Able To
7.1 History. The student understands traditional historical points of reference in Texas history.
7.1A identify the major eras in Texas

The significance of 1836 to

Students will write a
history, describe their defining
Texas history
paragraph to explain the civil,
characteristics, and explain why

The sequence of events related
political, and religious
historians divide the past into eras
to the Texas Revolution and
significance of 1836.
including…Revolution and Republic
the effects of these events on
Texas history.
7.1B apply absolute and relative

1836 has religious, social and
chronology through the sequencing of
significant individuals, events, and time
civil importance to Texas
periods
history.
7.1C explain the significance of the
following dates… 1836, Texas
independence…
Discuss as a group and share
with each other. What
activities will I use to engage
my students and ensure
mastery of these TEKS? What
can be assigned for
homework?
Lesson Plan for
Chapter 11 Texas
and Texans
Think about using
the Lesson on Sam
Houston in The
DBQ Project: What
Was Sam
Houston’s Most
Heroic Decision?
TEKS Continued Check the Students Will Know
and Students Will Be Able to….
TEKS Knowledge & Skills
Readiness and Supporting Standards are not
designated for this level.
Acquisition
Students Will Know
Students Will Be Able To
7.3 History. The student understands how individuals, events, and issues related to the Texas Revolution shaped the
history of Texas
7.3B explain the roles played by

The individuals listed in TEKS

Write an essay explaining the
significant individuals during the Texas
7.3B brought social change to
social effects of the Texas
Revolution, including George Childress,
Texas.
Revolution.
Lorenzo de Zavala, James Fannnin, Sam

The issues and events listed in

Create a graphic organizer to
Houston, Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna,
TEKS
7.3C
on
had
social
impact
explain the social impact of
Juan N. Seguin, and William B. Travis
on Texas.
issues, individuals, and events

The Texas Revolution brought
listed in TEKS 7.3B and 7.3C on
7.3C explain the issues surrounding
significant events of the Texas
civil, political, and religious
Texas.
Revolution, including the Battle of
freedom to Texas.

Describe the impact of the fall
Gonzales, William B. Travis’s letter “To
Stress to the students that they live
of the Alamo on the civilian
the People of Texas and All Americans in
in Texas and need to know its rich
population.
the World,” the siege of the Alamo and
and
interesting
history.
Talk
to
them

Explain to a partner how the
all the heroic defender who gave their
fall of the Alamo led to the
lives there, the Constitutional Convention about how Texas is the best state.
of 1836, Fannin’s surrender at Goliad,
Help students to develop pride in
Runaway Scrape.
and the Battle of San Jacinto
where they live, to love their state
and their country. Stress to them
Emphasize that the settlers and the
7.3D explain how the establishment of
that these people they are learning
were not against the Mexican
the Republic of Texas brought civil,
about did not stand on the sidelines. people, but against the loss of
political, and religious freedom to Texas
Each took an active part in the
freedom under Santa Anna and the
development of Texas even if it cost
Constitution of 1824.
them their lives.
Essay writing requires
students to take notes
during the lesson that they
will need to write the essay.
The teacher will need to
guide them on what
notes they need.
Keep a chart of the
historical figures in
7.3B. As the students
learn about them, ask
students why this
person is important and
what do we need to
remember about him?
Record on the chart,
they do the same on a
graphic organizer for
their notebook.
TEKS Continued
TEKS Knowledge & Skills
Use the
maps in
your
textbook
and/or the
wall maps
in your
classroom.
See maps
next slide.
Readiness and Supporting Standards are not
designated for this level.
Acquisition
Students Will Know
Students Will Be Able To
7.9 Geography. The student understands the location and characteristics of places and regions of Texas.
7.9A locate the Mountains and Basins,

Major landmarks and regions

Create a historical marker to
Great Plains, North Central Plains, and
during the Texas Revolution
show the impact of an event in
Coastal Plains regions and places of
can be found on a map using
the Texas Revolution on Texas
importance in Texas during the 19th
absolute and relative location.
history.
…century such as major cities, rivers,

Read selections of primary and
natural and historic landmarks, political
•
Physical
and
human
factors
secondary sources to analyze
and cultural regions, and local points of
impacted events during the
how physical features helped
interest
Texas Revolution.
or hindered the Runaway
7.9C analyze effects of physical and
Scrape.
human factors such as climate, weather,
landforms, irrigation, transportation and
communication on major events in Texas
Suggested homework and or Daily Work Activities:
Reading Essentials and Study Guide: Chapter 11, pp. 130-140
Activity Book: Chapter 11, pp. 21-22
When you know the TEKS, you will know what to stress to
the students, what to point out to them, what they need to
take notes on. Always refer back to the TEKS to make the
connections to what they are learning is required by the
state. Justify what they are learning by making them
explain what they know and how their knowledge fulfills
the TEKS requirement.
Use this map from Enchanted Learning.com for students to draw the locations listed in TEKS 7.9A
Use Texas outline
map for mapping
activities in
lesson portfolios
social studies
website.
Do students
know what
barrier islands
are and why
they are called
barrier
islands? Do
other states
have barrier
islands?
Assessment Evidence and Lesson
Planning Tools
Read and
discuss the
primary
source
account of
Noah
Smithwick
about the
Runaway
Scrape in
Texas and
Texans,
p. 248.
Secondary
source: The
Texas
Handbook
Online,
The
Runaway
Scrape
ASSESSMENT EVIDENCE
Student Work Products/Assessment Evidence
Performance Tasks
Other Evidence (i.e. unit tests, open ended exams, quiz,
essay, student work samples, observations, etc.)

Students will read and analyze primary and secondary
sources related to the Runaway Scrape in order to
write a journal entry detailing their experiences
during the Runaway Scrape.

Research and write a letter from Tejano supporters of
the Texas Revolution.

Student-created political cartoon about the impact of
the fall of the Alamo and the massacre at Goliad.
(See Slide 19 on political cartoons)
Encourage students to read from various sources about
The Runaway Scrape. Take notes and compare to the
textbook.
Short Cycle Assessment

SCA Testing Window: December 13-19, 2012

SEs eligible for testing include, but are not limited to:
7.3D, 7.9C
Additional Suggestions for Assessment

Teacher observations

Interactive Student Notebook entries addressing the
question, “How do conflicts affect all aspects of a
society?”

Graphic organizer listing the civil, political, and
religious impacts of the Texas Revolution
LESSON PLANNING TOOLS
In the course of lesson planning, it is the expectation that teachers will include whole child considerations when
planning such as differentiation, special education, English language learning, dual language, gifted and talented, social
emotional learning, physical activity, and wellness.
Model Lesson- Social Impact of the Texas Revolution
Suggested Pacing: 1 day (.5 Block Day)
TEKS: 7.1A, 7.1B, 7.1C, 7.2D, 7.22A, 7.22B, 7.22C
Instructional Resource: PENDING
There are many lessons on the social studies website for this part of the CRM.
Some Suggested Anchors of Support for Unit 3 Arcs 1 & 2
•
•
Glencoe, Texas and Texans, Chapters 9-11, Primary Source Adventures, Texas History Bio Cards: The Portal
of Texas History
The Texas Portal Lesson on causes and events leading to the Texas Revolution, Path to the Revolution,
Lorenzo de Zavala, The Law of April 6, 1830, Battle of San Jacinto
•
A resource for quality texts, school library, literacy center, books from the library that relate to the TEKS
being studied, books for teacher read-aloud
•
The Handbook of Texas Online for teacher background knowledge on content. Law of April 6, 1830 ,
Lesson April 6, 1830, Convention of 1836, Texas Revolution
•
True Veterans’ Account of the Battle of San Jacinto from The Portal of Texas History
•
Teacher Read-Aloud Ask your school librarian for a suitable historical fiction or memoir to read to the
students about life in Texas as a colonist.
•
A resource for higher order question stems make a copy to have
•
A copy of Probing Questions
•
The Handbook of Texas Online Background information: article on the Law of April 6, 1830; Mexican
Colonization Laws; Turtle Bayou Resolutions ;The Runaway Scrape
•
See Social Studies website for lessons.
•
Roger Moore’s website with more Texas Political Cartoons
•
Use graphic organizer (Two Column Chart) suggested in the text or determined by the teacher to support
student learning TEKS 7.3B.
•
The DBQ Project Unit 3 Remembering the Alamo: a Personal Journal and Unit 4 What was the Sam Houston’s
Most heroic Decision?
•
Primary sources and secondary sources from Texas and Texans, p. 248 account of Noah Smithwick about the
Runaway Scrape, p. 248.
make a copy to have
Always check all slides for other anchors of support and Homework suggestions.
CRM: Models/Anchors of Support… Instruction…
and Student Task… Plan your Lesson
Your classroom needs to reflect the TEKS and what is being studied.
Your anchors of support enhance and support your instruction.
Examples of Anchors for Support
The TEKS studied need to be written out for students to see and
connect to what is being studied.
•
Have available in your classroom: the textbook, The DBQ Project,
maps, other books/resources, websites, historical fiction, non fiction
for students to read, newspapers, magazines, posters, word walls
with academic vocabulary and supporting vocabulary, student
work… Check all slides for links to anchors for support.
Discovery Education Streaming, Austin Past and Present (you will need to
download to your computer), Teacher Read-Aloud…
o
What will your instruction include?
Primary Sources, Student Notebooks, graphic
organizers, maps, collaboration: small group
and partner work, models, read alouds, shared
and independent reading, research, projects,
technology…
o
o
o
o
Does your lesson engage/motivate
the students?
o
Task
The student task is aligned to
the TEKS/SE.
The task is aligned to
students’ differentiations
(SPED, ELL, GT).
Students are engaged in tasks.
Students are on task and able
to articulate learning.
Students are engaged, and
learning is student-centered.
Students are working as a
class, small group, partner,
individual.
Use Political Cartoons as Warm Ups or during a
lesson
Use a graphic
organizer to analyze a
political cartoon.
Political Graphic
Organizer Analysis
document
Students need to use their
social studies vocabulary
words when discussing
political cartoons.
Roger Moore’s website
with more Texas Political
Cartoons
Don’t Forget: ELPS, CCRS, and 21st Century Framework….

ELPS
These standards are required by law and are not only designed to make content
comprehensible and develop academic language for ELL’s but support quality
instruction for all learners in listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

CCRS
These standards were approved in 2008 to ensure that Texas students are graduating
from high school with all the skills necessary to be successful in college. These focus not
only on content but the intellectual skills and underlying understandings of the structure
of knowledge necessary to be highly equipped for post-secondary education.

Framework for 21st Century Learning
This framework is designed to outline the skills, knowledge, and expertise students need
to be successful in life, work, and globally. They focus on aptitudes such as, creativity,
technology, collaboration, critical thinking, problem solving, and communication.
Take a Few Minutes…
Discuss and plan with your team how you will teach each Unit and ARC
Review the slides as needed…
•
What content might your students have difficulty in understanding?
•
What words/phrases in the TEKS will students have difficulty
in understanding?
•
What anchors of support do my students need? Download as much of the
online material and have copies ready for students to read. Do you need one
copy for each student? It depends, if you are a Focus l or Focus ll campus, then
definitely. Students can write on their copy, highlight, underline…. If it is a
partner assignment, then perhaps one copy for each pair of students.
•
How will I reference/use the anchors of support in my lesson?
•
What primary sources am I using in the lesson? What primary sources does the
textbook have, other web sources? What graphic organizers for primary
sources are we going to use?
•
What are my performance tasks? How will my lesson (instruction) support
students to complete the performance task?
•
Think about homework you will give your students to support their
understanding and mastery of the TEKS.
•
Do give homework and make it the expectation! Use your textbook ancillary
books, such as the Reading Essentials and Study Guide, the Activity
Workbook and others…
Important:
Introduce the Performance
Assessment. Go over each
part. You will have to be
explicit in your instruction.
Discuss what is expected of
each group and what each
person is expected to do.
You will need to set up
what they do in class and
what they do for
homework. If they have
done a project, then allow
the groups to discuss and
set up what they need to do
on their own time
(homework). The teacher
needs to approve their
schedule. Remember: you
will still have to shadow
and give explicit
instructions and a timeline
of expectations. Discuss
the Rubric and
Assessment list in order
for students to understand
the expectations for this
work.
You do not have to do every
project. You might want to
do one per six weeks or
every other six weeks.
Students should work as
partners. Some may want
to work alone.
Chapter 9
Challenge…
Students work
with a partner,
or in groups of 3.
These projects
provide
challenge for
your students.
Let them present
to the class.
Always use the
Student
Accountability
slip for the
listeners.
Ch. 9 Performance Task and Rubric: Give students a
copy of each.
When You Do A Project…
•
Divide students into small groups or partners (nor more than 3). The first Assessment Project
students do, the teacher will have to provide very structured instruction, modeling, and one on
one coaching especially when they write paragraphs. Accept only their best work. When students
work in groups, they will not have to write more than one or two of the paragraphs.
•
Will they grumble about doing a project, probably, but they are in school to learn and you are at
your school to teach. Don’t be dismayed. Take small steps, be positive, and stay after them to
challenge themselves. The first project is the hardest. When students complete a challenging task,
they may gripe like we do, but when they finish, they develop self-esteem and are proud of
themselves. Be positive, when they complain, acknowledge their feelings, but just keep moving
forward.
•
Have each group of students present their project.
•
The second project will be easier and by the third project, they will still need guidance, but will
be able to work more independently.
•
There is never enough time, try one project per 6 weeks or a minimum of two in the semester.
Examine the TEKS covered through a project.
•
These projects are already designed and the steps are laid out and easy to follow. The teacher will
have to add information she/he thinks the students will need.
During the project presentation, the other students are taking notes on each explorer to fill
in his/her timeline, map, graphic organizer, or student accountability slip on the social studies
website. MAKE STUDENTS ACCOUNTABLE! Remember: We have to always be one (or more if
possible) step ahead of them (or at least make them think we are).
Chapter 10
Important:
Introduce the Performance
Assessment. Go over each
part. You will have to be
explicit in your instruction.
Discuss what is expected of
each group and what each
person is expected to do. You
will need to set up what they
do in class and what they do
for homework. If they have
done a project, then allow
the groups to discuss and set
up what they need to do on
their own time (homework).
The teacher needs to approve
their schedule. Remember:
you will still have to shadow
and give explicit instructions
and a timeline of
expectations. Discuss the
Rubric and Assessment list
in order for students to
understand the expectations
for this work.
You do not have to do every
project. You might want to
do one per six weeks or every
other six weeks. Students
should work as partners.
Some may want to work
alone.
You are
covering
Chapters 9,
10, & 11.
Choose one
project or let
students
choose the
project they
would like
to do.
Challenge…
Students work with a
partner, or in groups
of 3. These projects
provide challenge for
your students.
Let them present to the
class. Always use the
Student Accountability
slip for the listeners.
Chapter 10 Project… Give students
a copy of each
Chapter 11 Give students a copy.
Could parts of the
projects be used for
homework, daily activity,
part of the lesson,
instruction….
Chapter 11 continued…Students need a copy of each
Next Steps… Think about…
Before planning your lessons, review,
concept, pacing, unit, arc, TEKS,
vocabulary, resources, Students Will
Know, Students Will Be Able To,
Performance Tasks, Assessments, and
model lessons in the portfolios.
Look at the TEKS and the academic
vocabulary they contain. What can you
use in the CRM, what can you add to the
lesson to enhance engagement and
mastery for your students? Look at the
model lesson for support. What can you
use from this PowerPoint? Look at The
DBQ Project resources.
Don’t forget:
assign
homework.
Make that an
expectation!
•
What guiding questions and/or stems are you going to use
to promote the use of academic vocabulary, to engage the
students, and support comprehension of what is being
learned?
•
What questions are being used to pique the students’ curiosity
that they cannot resist wanting to answer?
“Teaching consists of equal parts perspiration, inspiration, and
resignation.” - Susan Ohanian
•
How will you provide opportunities for students to use
academic vocabulary to demonstrate their learning and
mastery?
 How are you going to encourage the use of academic
vocabulary? How are you going to set the expectation that
students use academic vocabulary in the classroom?
 What primary sources can you use in these lessons?
 Are you communicating to students that in your classroom
it is the expectation that the students speak and write in
complete sentences using academic vocabulary with
meaning and understanding?
Education…
“At the desk where I sit, I
have learned one great
truth. The answer for all
our national problemsthe answer for all the
problems of the worldcomes down to a single
Homework
Make It Interesting and Make It Positive
Suggestions…
•
Book reports and presentations
•
Assessment Projects from the Chapters included in
this Power Point.
•
Read and highlight a short article from Texas
Handbook online or other source linked in this
portfolio:
•
From Texas and Texans, make copies of biographies
for Juan Neponmuceno Sequín, p. 206, George C.
Childress , p. 219, and James Fannin, p. 226, The
Handbook of Texas online for George C. Childress,
Juan Nepomuceno Sequín, Sam Houston,
Santa Anna , and/or William B. Travis. Students read
and summarize each man’s life and contributions to
Texas, create a time line of each man’s life
and events, and/or create a bio card to trade. Keep
these men on a chart along with their contributions to
Texas in the classroom and post summaries/timelines
of their lives.
•
Illustrate a TX history event, historical figure and write
a short paragraph about the illustration.
•
Activity pages from the textbook ancillary books,
chapter 9-11, pp. 17-22
•
Reading Essentials and Study Guide, chapters 9-11,
pp. 105-140
•
Pose one question pertaining to the content
being studied for students to answer in a written
paragraph.
•
Analyze the Newspaper advertisement, Texas and
Texas, p. 207. Use questions in textbook, Points of
View p. 234
What are the benefits?
Homework usually falls into one of three
categories: practice, preparation, or
extension. The purpose usually varies by
grade. Individualized assignments that tap
into students' existing skills or interests can
be motivating. At the elementary school
level, homework can help students
develop study skills and habits and can
keep families informed about their child's
learning. At the secondary school level,
student homework is associated with
greater academic achievement. (Review of
Educational Research, 2006)
Will all students do their homework…no, but
even if one does it, you have made a difference.
Planning continued…
Planning Instruction:
After reviewing the CRM•
How will you engage your students so that the learning is relevant to them?
•
What questions will you use to support and guide students to mastery of the
TEKS being studied and beyond?
•
How will your students demonstrate that they have mastered the learning
(assessment)? How will you know they have the Essential Understandings?
Are able to answer the Essential Questions?
•
What strategies, best practices will engage and drive the learning for mastery
from each of your students? What primary sources will you use to support
the learning?
•
What are your anchors of support for this lesson?
•
What differentiation accommodations will you need to add to your lesson so
that all students meet the standards?
As you plan…Address the needs of
diverse learners….
The first part of differentiating instruction involves: finding out where your students
are starting in their knowledge base and anticipating areas where clarification may be
necessary. There are formal and informal ways to acquire this information.
What background knowledge, prior learning, and habits do students need in order to
be successful with the new concept?
What misconceptions need to be clarified before new learning takes place?
How will instruction be differentiated to address the needs of all learners?
• At what level of proficiency (in English/prerequisite skills) are my students?
• What supports/scaffolds would support the student understanding?
Who can I ask for help? The school SPED teacher, the District SPED office, ESL
teachers at the school, the District Bilingual Dept. and of course the Social Studies
Dept.
Homework is for all.
What does My Day Look Like…
You have 14 days or 7 Blocks for Unit 3, Arcs 1 & 2 Texas and Texans, Chapters 9-11, The Handbook of Texas online, Portal to
Texas History
Some suggestions are listed below. Use the CRM, model lessons, this Power Point for suggested student resources and
activities.
Daily Schedule 45 minutes and 90 minute block scheduling
Warm-up – 10 minutes (90 minute block-15 minutes)
Engagement/Warm-up Suggestions :
Vocabulary game: Kick-Me Activity You may want to name it something else, such as “Can You Figure It Out?” (Teachers: Please see the
short video clip.) There is a short video clip to watch students in action. I have included an analogy activity sheet using all the vocabulary
words for Unit 3. You might want to do this as a pretest to see how many words students get right, take up the papers and do it as a closing
activity at the end of the unit. At the above website on the right side are a list of materials you will want to review. The last one labeled Kick
Me Analogies Class Worksheets is actually a PowerPoint on how to write analogies. It is short and a quick review for the teacher. I am
including the analogy and historical figures worksheets for this unit. The relationship part they will answer for each analogy are listed at the
top of the worksheet. Please feel free to create your own. The vocabulary answer words to write on post-its are on Slide 5 under Unit 3.
EMPHASIZE: NO KICKING OR THEY WILL WORK INDEPENDENTLY AND THERE IS 0 TOLERANCE.
If anyone does kick, immediately tell them to sit down, they are out of the game. Don’t argue with them. If too many of your class have
to sit down, then they can work in pairs. If you have to sit the class down, explain to them that they don’t appear to be ready for this type
of activity, however, in a few weeks we can try it again.
Remember: there are other vocabulary games that have been in these modules that you can use in place of the one above.
•
Read Aloud (book on content being studied) Suggested: Ask your school librarian for a fiction or non fiction chapter book on living
in Texas during this time period or several picture books to read aloud, look for a primary source memoir, some are linked on the
slides. Spend 10 minutes each day looking at one of the paintings and use the Art Graphic Organizers linked on the slides.
•
Question posed for short discussion and brainstorm
o What would your life be life if you were a colonist in Texas from 1821-1836? What would you think about living with one set of
laws or regulations and then having them changed?
o What were some notable events for Texas during the year 1836?
o Looking at the different images in Chapter__ (as you study each chapter), what can we learn about the people in Texas?
o What were some of the events that occurred and how did these events affect the people living in Texas? Mexican and Anglo?
Analogies: Using the ____ between words in order to ____________ them.
Relationship- specific: general; antonyms; synonyms
Analogy- book: reading: math: calculating
How to read it- book is to reading as math is to calculating
AND
Historical Figures: Who Am I?
relationship
analogy
Use both pages
together. Put postits on the backs of
students with
either a
vocabulary word
or historic figure.
Historic Figures: Who Am I?
Person
blockade: isolation ::_________________:
surround



laws: constitution:: _______________: government
battle: combat:: _______________________: shift
bullet: shooting:: cannonball: _______________
soldier: brigade:: _________________: placement
soldier: war:: rebel:_________________
lying: dishonesty:: _______________:find evidence
join: separate:: __________________:to take apart













loyalty: faithful:: betrayal: ___________________
lawful: legal:: an order (edict): ____________
dying: death:: slaughtering: ________________




charging: retreat:: ________________:avoidance

recoil: avoidance:: ________________: collision

ranch: town:: _____________:soldier
Make your own analogy
__________: __________:: ___________:
_________


Characteristics
Participated in the Battle of Gonzalez
Led Texas Forces at Battle of Concepcíon
Delayed following General Houston’s
orders
Put to Death at Goliad
Did not fight at Gonzales
Became a Lt. Col. In the Texas Army
Commanded troops at the Alamo
Died at the Alamo
Survived the Battle of the Alamo
Fought in the Texas Revolution
Fought the Battle of at San Jacinto
Born and raised in San Antonio
Practiced law and edited a newspaper
Volunteered for the Texas army
Born in Nashville, Tennessee
Recognized as the primary author of the
Texas Declaration of Independence
Began his military career at age 16
Refused to accept the Mexican
Constitution of 1824
Led the Mexican attack at the Alamo
Fought against Sam Houston at the Battle
of San Jacinto
Elected as the first Vice-President of the
Texas Republic
A strong supporter in democratic ideals
and Texas independence
Participated in the drafting of the
Constitution of the Republic of Texas
Traveled to Mexico with Santa Anna to
persuade the Mexican government to
recognize Texas independence
Instruction/Activity/Group/Individual Work: 25-30
minutes (90 minute block 60-70 minutes)
Teacher explains, guides, instructs: The Teacher needs to have read the chapter,
articles and know what the students need to retain to master the TEKS and
have questions/resources ready for discussion and activities.
Teacher Notes:
• Use a graphic organizer for note taking such as the foldable suggested in the
textbook, use a timeline, or other graphic organizer of your choice.
• When reading the text: remember, it is at the instructional level and students
will need help in reading and comprehending what is being read. Texas and
Texans, Chapters 9-11, The Texas History Handbook online: articles are
hyperlinked as well has other resources in the Power Point. You will need to
read the article on Lorenzo de Zavala from the Texas Handbook as the
textbook is lacking on information for this significant historic figure.
Have your questions, activities, materials, maps ready and
at your fingertips. Instruction will flow
AND
classroom management will run smoother.
Don’t give them time to be or get off-task!
Instruction/Activity/Group/Individual Work: 25-30
minutes (90 minute block 60-70 minutes)
Before Reading: Chapter 8 & 9.3Have students create two graphic organizers Chapters 9-11. You may use the one listed at the beginning of each
section or one of your choice. Students will need a graphic organizer for taking notes on their readings. Students will
need the 2nd graphic organizer for analyzing primary sources, visual activities, vocabulary or other activity TBD by the
teacher. If the assessment is a writing piece such as a newspaper article , letter writing …make sure students take the
notes they will need for these activities or other activities TBD by the teacher.
During Reading: (No more than 5-10 minutes at a time, stop, do an activity, See below *Vary the activities.
The teacher will use questions that direct students to what is important to write on the graphic organizer or timeline
they are using. Call attention to and connect the TEKS when you read, discuss the information that is read that they
need to know. The teacher can also use the guided reading guides in the Unit Resources ancillary materials for
Chapters 9-11 .
Do not assign the whole chapter for students to read alone or in small groups. They may be able to read small portions,
but the teacher will need to follow up with questions to check comprehension. Read a Texas Handbook online article
and compare to the text.
*Vary the reading and activities: Teacher reads a paragraph, students do shared reading, students read a paragraph in
partners (follow up with questions and answers especially if what has been read needs to be written on the graphic
organizer/timeline). Think about discussing/summarizing each paragraph. “What was said here that we need to
remember? Does this and how does this…connect to the TEK(s) we are studying?”
Students read a paragraph independently (again follow up with questions to make sure everyone comprehends what
they read). Be aware of what is in the chapter, is it necessary for students to read everything?
Look at the Project activity for each chapter. Could the project be used to teach the TEKS and the readings as a
resource?
*Vary the activities. Read, then do an activity, such as mapping, adding to the timeline, adding to graphic
organizers, Think, Pair, Share in small groups, use the question stems from the websites listed on the Slide 3 of this
module. Illustrations in the student notebooks of a vocabulary word, quick research of something unknown and
needed to understand the meaning, mini biography cards. Moving from one activity to another smoothly and with no
breaks keeps students engaged and“on their toes” and behaving!
Some Suggested Activities To Do:
An activity for students keeps students engaged and holds them accountable for their learning during your instruction
and during peer presentation. An activity varies the instruction.
Read for no more than 10 minutes, then choose an activity to fit what you are learning and need to learn.
Pose questions to the students from each section of the reading. When you know your question is answered in the
reading then stop and ask your question again. Have a 2-3 minute discussion or have them talk with each other to
answer the question.
It may be a turn and talk, a quick map activity, a shoulder partner share, a quick write on
their their graphic organizer, a quick sketch to show their understanding, a one word hangman vocabulary
word, guess the word I am describing…., visual image analysis Texas and Texans, pp. 205, 207, 216-217,
223, 224, 227, 230, 231, 240, 245, 248 ( I found this picture to most intriguing.), 255, 256,259
*Graphic organizers are for notes, not paragraphs or essays, one to two minutes per item.
A timeline can be used to list historical figures, important events, and dates.
Students take notes. Use the foldable study organizer, a timeline, or other graphic organizer shown in
the text book to record notes. (Remember you will need to remind them to take notes… “This
information is directly related to the TEKS we are studying…This may be something you want to jot
down…this is important for you to remember…this looks like it belongs on your timeline, foldable or
other graphic organizer…”
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Create a vertical or horizontal timeline as students are learning about historical figures and events.
Use a map to find people and events during the time period being studied.
Who is …. (one of the people in the TEKS being studied or another important person. Take notes for a later project
on creating mini bio cards…
Use the lessons in the CRM and the activities. Use primary sources that connect to the lesson.
Use the ancillary resources, Activities Work Book, Performance Assessment Projects, Reading Essentials and Study
Guide, Step into Texas History, and the Unit Resources for Guided Reading.
Discuss: Why were some colonists satisfied/not satisfied under Mexican rule?
Use questions to connect the content to the students. Always emphasize: The Texans were not at war with the
Mexican People, but the Mexican government and the restrictions on their freedoms.
Activities Keep Students Engaged
•
Use the Glencoe Texas and Texans website for a web activities and lessons.
•
Use maps to locate historic events being studied.
•
The DBQ project has many primary source activities for the lessons that can be used for this Unit 3.
•
Use graphic organizers to take notes and record information.
•
Read articles suggested on the slides from the Texas History Handbook Online.
•
Use a time line to record historical figures, their roles, important dates and events.
•
Use Austin Past and Present to peruse primary source pictures to find human adaptations and record what
they are, where they are, and when they took place.
•
Activity Book (Chapters 9-11) vocabulary and comprehension skills (May be Homework)
•
Chap. 9-11 Resources: Reading Essentials and Study Guide
• Start a project using the Performance Assessment, Activities and Rubrics Book in this PowerPoint (ancillary
book for the textbook).
• Read and analyze Eye Witness Reports primary source recollections of the Runaway Scrape
• Other Accounts from the Celtic Cowboy
• Battle of San Jacinto painting by Henry McArdle See next slide
•
Graphic Analysis 1 for ART
•
Graphic Analysis 2 for ART
•
Graphic Analysis for photograph
Dawn at the Alamo
By Henry McArdle
• Graphic Analysis 1 for ART
• Graphic Analysis 2 for ART
Use the Document
Analysis Worksheet
from the National
Archives for
photographs to
analyze this picture.
It has all the
questions you need.
• Graphic Analysis 1 for ART
• Graphic Analysis 2 for ART
The Battle of San Jacinto
By Henry McArdle
Closing and Final Processing
Closing/Debriefing/Summarizing 5-10 minutes (90 minute Block 15-20 minutes)
When writing, emphasize: complete sentences and correct punctuation and grammar.
Always debrief what was studied-Hold a 5 minute discussion and then have students write one or two
sentences about what they viewed was important, interesting, something new they learned, what
they connected to or other TBD by the teacher. The teacher may give out Exit Slips with a sentence
starter. Stress to students: Sentence is written with correct grammar and punctuation. When speaking,
they are to speak in complete sentences. (Always expect student’s best work. It will not happen in a
day, but by the end of the 6 weeks you will see a change in your students. Students will struggle, but
they will rise to your expectation. Set your expectations HIGH!
Final Processing Activity: Allow time for them to write a letter, prepare for a debate,
assume the role of a historical figure, write a newspaper article...
Know what that end product is and prepare them for it during the lesson. See the
Performance Tasks for other Final Processing Activities. Consider having students do a Project described in
this PowerPoint Slides
You will want to set up a graphic organizer with places for students to take notes on content they will need to
complete their final assignments/projects. By using the graphic organizer during the lessons, you save time because
students are preparing for their performance tasks. When the time comes for them to complete a performance task,
they are not starting at the beginning, but have the foundation for their work done and can now craft it into the
project/assignment required. You are teaching students how to organize their time, the content information, and
maximize their understanding and comprehension.
Remember, even though they are in 7th grade, many still don’t grasp what they are to do/write You are there to
support until they can be independent. What that means is that you guide them in each step they are to take. Your
lessons are structured and explicit so they know exactly what is expected and it is in increments that they can
accomplish successfully.
Schedule ReCap:
Warm Up/Engagement: 5-10 minutes (10-15 minutes Block)
See Slide 40
Instruction: 30 minutes (60-70 minutes Block)
Reading: 5-10 minutes (textbook, other article…)
Activity: 2-5 minutes (take notes, map, primary source…)
Repeat
Reading
Activity…
Closing: 5-10 minutes (15-20 minutes Block)
Debrief on what was learned.
Final Processing Activity: …
Of course this time will vary. If you have analyzed the time you have for the
lesson, what needs to be read, what activities students can do to stay engaged
and support the learning, time for note taking, then you can plan for a longer
performance task which may be the closing activity such as writing a letter,
preparing for a debate, assuming a role, a project, etc.
Graphic Organizers: Dinah Zike’s Big
Book of Texas History
Graphic Organizers: Dinah
Zike’s Big Book of Texas History
Review: Clear Expectations
• Knowledge and Skill Statement and Student Expectations posted and
referenced in the classroom.
• What resources, models or anchors of support will we use?
• How will students be held accountable for their learning and make
their thinking public?
• How will discussion and collaboration be encouraged and expected?
• How will students be grouped to extend and challenge their thinking
and problem solving abilities?
• What activities will I use? What primary sources can I use?
• How will students be motivated and engaged?
• How will I vary/pace the activities so students stay engaged? What is
my time schedule?
Best Practices…
Because Teaching and Assessing have a reciprocal relationship
Plan your lessons with these questions…
Best Practices:
• How will the teacher model/explain clear expectations for the students’
learning? (Such as developing a criteria chart with the students)
•
What anchors of support can be used/created to help students in their
thinking?
•
•
Which 21st Century Skills can be targeted?
How will students be held accountable for their new learning (and
homework), as well as make their thinking and learning public?
•
How will accountable discussions and collaboration be encouraged in an
atmosphere of mutual respect to the students?
•
•
How will students be grouped to challenge their thinking (problem solving)?
What role might technology play in making the learning more accessible and
at the same time, challenging?
Selecting the right resources…
•
The Social Studies grade level textbook and ancillary materials are a great place
to start.
•
•
The Texas Handbook Online is a solid resource for topics on Texas. Students
have an alternate to the textbook with more detailed information.
The CRM has resources listed under the Unit and the Arc.
•
•
Check out the Social Studies Website for more resources in your grade level.
Texas Portal lessons
•
The Library Services Media Center using IBISTRO: The Encyclopedia
Britanica and the World Book are online. Many other District licensed internet
resources are also there, along with usernames and passwords, including
Discovery Education Streaming. (Go the AISD website, type in IBISTRO in
the web address, click on Portal Knowledge.)
•
The school library and if your school has one, the literacy library for books on the
content being studied that your students can read in addition to the textbook.
•
Select the appropriate primary sources for students to use and analyze to
develop meaning and understanding on the lesson being taught.
•
Use the Analysis graphic organizers for the appropriate primary source you are
using.
Don’t Forget…Student Engagement/
Formative Assessment
•
Reading/Research: Texas and Texans, Chapters 9-11, The Texas Handbook articles on line.
Review slides in the series “What Your Day Looks Like…”
•
Teacher High-Level Questioning Slide 3, two live links on questions
•
Collaboration, whole and small group work: Map comparison, any activity
•
Expectation for Justification of Thinking/Text/Research: Use in all class discussions, using
different sources, Texas Handbook online…
•
Evidence: Students point out in the text their evidence for their answers.
•
Turn and Talk : Use for questions during Read-Aloud or reading text. Student comment on
what was stated in the text, “What happened? Why it is important?”
•
Think-Pair-Share/Write-Pair-Share/ISN reflection can be done at the end of class as a part
of the debriefing, processing or as quick activities during the lesson.
•
Randomization of Responses: Engagement vocabulary activity, analyze primary
resources, mapping comparisons…
•
Teacher Wait Time! Let them think before answering, expect complete sentences.
•
Exit Slips: Use before they leave class, one statement on what they learned.
•
Homework Suggestions: Slide 32 and on other slides
Don’t Forget…Writing
Personal Writing- essay, letter,
newspaper article, paragraph,
reflection…
Write personal reflections/illustrations
on content Student Notebook
Factual Writing- Graphic organizers,
Interactive Student Notebook,
Student -Created newspaper article,
letter,…
•
•
•
•
•
•
Summarize what was learned
Explain the cause and effects in important events
Analyze events, historical figures
Interpret maps, data, graphs
Use graphic organizers
Illustrations on what was learned
During reading
and research, use
timelines or other
graphic
organizers for
note taking to
support final
piece.
Stay together as a Team
Continue to plan your lessons looking at the CRM with the TEKS
and all your resources. Review the slides…
“The aim of education should be to teach
us rather how to think, than what to
think-rather to improve our minds, as to
enable us to think for ourselves,….”
James Beattie
“Education is all a matter of building
bridges.”
Ralph Ellison
Plan ahead, know your content, organize your
lesson, have your materials ready and at your
fingertips, be enthusiastic with your students, have
high expectations, make every word and minute
count.

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