PowerPoint - Mrs. Compton`s Social Studies Class

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Chapter 18:
The Atlantic System and Africa
AIM: How did the Atlantic System affect Europe, Africa,
and the Americas?
DAY ONE:
• AIM: How did the Atlantic System affect Europe, Africa, and the Americas?
DO NOW:
What inferences can you make from this
chart? Make a list of observations.
• AIM: How did the Atlantic System affect Europe, Africa, and the Americas?
Socratic Seminar
• Step One: In small groups of no more than 4, discuss
your answers to the questions that you completed for
homework last night.
• What factors led to the development of the African slave
trade?
• How did the cultivation of sugar impact the environment?
• Describe plantation life. How did slaves react to life on the
plantation? How did European planters?
• How did participation in the Atlantic system affect social and
political development in Africa and the Americas?
• Do you agree with the statement: “Slavery was not born of
racism: rather, racism was the consequence of slavery?”.
Review Academic Sentence Starters
Review Academic Sentence Starters
• AIM: How did the Atlantic System affect Europe, Africa, and the Americas?
Socratic Seminar
• Step Two: Create two big circles. Choose one
moderator. Discuss the following:
• What factors led to the development of the African slave
trade?
• How did the cultivation of sugar impact the environment?
• Describe plantation life. How did slaves react to life on the
plantation? How did European planters?
• How did participation in the Atlantic system affect social and
political development in Africa and the Americas?
• Do you agree with the statement: “Slavery was not born of
racism: rather, racism was the consequence of slavery?”.
CLOSURE:
• What questions do you still have?
• Were you successful at today’s Socratic
Seminar? Why or why not?
AIM: How did the Atlantic System affect Europe, Africa,
and the Americas?
DAY TWO:
DO NOW:
• What treaty is the map above showing? Treaty of Tordesilles
Manumission
• ________________________
was a legal grant of freedom to an individual
slave
• Communities of __________________,
runaway Caribbean slaves, were
Maroons
numerous in the mountains interiors of Jamaica and Hispanola.
West India
• The Dutch ___________________
Company was formed to help the Dutch
in their struggle for independence from Spain.
• Power in the West Indies was in the hands of a small number of rich men
(Plantocracy)
who formed a _____________________.
Socratic Seminar Wrap Up
• What factors led to the development of the African
slave trade?
• How did the cultivation of sugar impact the
environment?
• Describe plantation life. How did slaves react to life on
the plantation? How did European planters?
• How did participation in the Atlantic system affect
social and political development in Africa and the
Americas?
• Do you agree with the statement: “Slavery was not
born of racism: rather, racism was the consequence of
slavery?”.
Video: Mankind
• As you watch the segment of “Mankind”, consider the
following questions:
• Why did African monarchs trade with the Europeans?
• What were the consequences of doing so?
BALANCE OF TRADE
BUILD COLONIES
MERCANTILISM
HIGH TARIFFS
TRADE w/ COLONIES
What was mercantilism?
MERCANTILISM
Economic theory of how a nation can
become wealthy
Goal: Build up as much wealth as you can!!!
How did a nation follow mercantilism?
The theory of
Mercantilism offered a
step by step plan for a
government to follow
What was step one of mercantilism?
How To Make A Rich and Powerful Nation
Step #1
EXPORT more than IMPORT
What you sell to other
countries
What you buy from
other countries
Goal: Have more money coming in than going out =
favorable BALANCE OF TRADE
What was step two of mercantilism?
How To Make A Rich and Powerful Nation
Step #2
Build Colonies
Colonies provide:
 Easy access to cash crops
 Places to sell items made in your country
What was step three of mercantilism?
How To Make A Rich and Powerful Nation
Step #3
High TARIFFS
Taxes on outside
goods
Problem: people are buying goods
from other countries
Solution: Charge them more money to buy foreign goods
What was step four of mercantilism?
How To Make A Rich and Powerful Nation
Step #4
Increase exports
Don't’ let your colonies
trade with other countries
They either buy an item from
you or they don’t buy it at all!
Homework: Read pages 473-481 and take
Cornell notes. Exclude green pages.
Test on chapters 17 and 18 on
Wednesday!
AIM: How and why did European businessmen, with the
help of their governments, put this trading system
together?
DAY THREE:
DO NOW: What are the Navigation Acts, according to the image, and
how did they enforce mercantilism?
Activity One: Document Analysis
• In pairs, read and analyze NINE PRINCIPAL RULES OF
NATIONAL ECONOMY by Philip Wilhelm von Hornick.
• First: Annotate each principle. Put it in your own words.
• Then consider these questions:
• How does this document reflect your understanding of
mercantilism? Give an example of this from your study of World
History.
• What does von Hornick say about inhabitants of the countries?
Explain.
• Finally: Predict what could happen as a result of
implementation of von Hornick’s thinking.
Activity Two: Mercantilism Scenarios
Directions: In your groups of 4, apply what you
have already learned about mercantilism to
the situations on your paper. Read the scenario
and answer the questions that follow. After
you have had time to read, answer, and discuss
in your groups, you will present your scenario
to the rest of the class and elicit their
responses.
AIM: How did sub-Saharan Africa’s expanding contacts in
the Atlantic compare with its contacts with the Islamic
world?
DAY FOUR:
DO NOW: Choose the correct answer
• What was a major difference between East Africa and West
African slave trades?
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
The East African slave trade was always larger than the West
African slave trade.
The West African slave trade was always larger than the East
African slave trade
Most West African slaves were taken by African kingdoms,
while most East African slaves were taken by Arab traders
Most East African slaves were taken by African kingdoms, while
most West African slaves were taken by Arab traders
Most West African slaves were taken by European traders,
while most East African slaves were taken by African kingdoms
Discussion:
This map shows the Peterson vs. the Mercator projections. How
might these projections show inequality?
Activity One: Create an Annotated Map
• Using your Cornell notes from last night’s readings, create an
annotated map of “Africa, the Atlantic, and Islam”. Include the
following information on your map:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Trade routes and directions
What is traded
Who is involved in the trade
Major conflicts
Significant individuals
Significant cities and ports
AIM: How did sub-Saharan Africa’s expanding contacts in the Atlantic
compare with its contacts with the Islamic world?
DAY FIVE:
DO NOW:
• How and why did Islamic influence in
sub-Saharan Africa differ from the
influence of Europeans?
• Hand in annotated maps.
Mini-Quiz
• Draw an outline map of Africa and label the following:
•
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•
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•
•
Swahili Coastal States
Bornu
Hausa States
Slave Coast and Gold Coast
Songhai
Cape Colony
• Define Swahili
DBQ
• Feedback: GROUPINGS ARE TOO BROAD!
• When responding to a DBQ, your groupings need to be
relevant and valid. You many not merely discuss
authors whose last names all begin with Q and receive
credit for a valid grouping. When grouping documents,
take the following criteria into consideration…
• MISSING DOCUMENT: You need to EXPLAIN WHY this
document would be necessary to deepen your
understanding!
Activity One:
1. With a partner, read the article given to you
about Groupings and POV.
2. Summarize each section of the POV reading.
Create three discussion questions based on
the reading that will be used in a large
group discussion when you are finished.
Activity 1: Group Work
Directions:
1. Complete a detailed SOAPSTone analysis of your assigned
documents in your groups.
2. Identify the major characteristics that can be used to group
the documents. Remember to use the guidelines discussed
during the mini-lesson!
3. Determine the POV and Groupings for your documents!
4. Present your findings to the class.
Groupings
Documents can be grouped by their
• Type (e.g., letter, book, diary, political platform, government
document, statistics, newspaper account, business records, etc.)
• Period in which the documents were written
• Point of view (e.g., you may also make a group of two or more
documents whose points of view disagree with each other; the idea
is to show that you can combine and juxtapose the ideas and you
recognize that the documents are “talking” to each other.)
Documents can also be grouped by their authors’
• Gender
• Education, occupation, or social or economic class
• Nationality
• Religion
• Location (e.g., rural, urban, Paris, etc.)
• Ideology
POV
The AP Readers require evidence that proves students understand POV
in at least three explicit instances. Even if you group documents by
POV, you must discuss POV in three separate documents. In general the
idea is to analyze the motivation or reliability of the sources.
For example, a statement made by a well respected authority on a
subject is probably more reliable for factual content than is political
propaganda. Or, a diary entry is probably more reliable for revealing
the true thoughts of a person than an official public statement. The list
that follows identifies for students ways in which they can demonstrate
to Readers their ability to apply POV to the DBQ documents.
POV: Referencing Internal Bias
You can reference the internal bias you see in
the document. Examples of name calling,
loaded language, and other kinds of rhetoric
betray the author’s prejudices or biases.
POV: Referencing External Bias
You can reference the external bias you see in
the document. What is the author’s selfinterest that makes the author say the things
you see in the document? Do people of certain
groups usually construe issues in certain ways?
POV: Exploring Influences
You can write, “The author thinks (or says) X because the author
wants (or needs or believes) Y.” When dealing with POV on the
DBQ, you should explore how the author’s gender, occupation,
class, religion, nationality, political position, or ethnic identity may
have influenced the views expressed in the document.
Remember that it does not count as understanding POV if you
merely say what the author of a document thinks. You are using
POV when your discussion accounts for what the author says.
Explain why someone holds a certain view or speaks about
something in a certain tone.
You will not earn POV points merely for using attribution when you
discuss the documents, even if you do it every time.
POV: Showing Evidence
It is not enough to merely say that someone
was biased or prejudiced. To earn credit you
must give the Reader your evidence that
supports your assertion that someone is
biased. The evidence may come from the
document itself or from your understanding of
the author’s external bias.
POV: Using Critical Analysis.
Do not accept every document you read as
fact. Pay attention to the circumstances behind
the creation of the document and its author’s
goals. You may discuss the reliability and
accuracy of a source. By applying critical
analysis, you demonstrate your ability to
understand how author bias and type of
document can influence a source’s reliability
POV: Grouping Documents
You can group some documents by author.
When you do so, you show that you are aware
that certain types of authors, by being in that
certain type, share and express similar views.
You may group and evaluate documents by
type. Public documents like government
statistics may be compared to private
documents like diaries or letters.
CLOSURE:
• What is the additional document? What is the reasoning
behind your choice?

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