APUSH History Review

Report
EXAM PREPARATION
APUSH
MRS. BAKER
Overview of the Exam
 Designed to evaluate the knowledge, understanding,
and thinking and writing skills that would be
demonstrated in a year-long introductory-level
college course in U.S. History.
 Combination of factual knowledge and ability to
analyze historical questions in a critical manner is
the major key to success of the exam.
The Exam
 3 hours and 5 minutes
 Consists of 2 sections –
 Multiple Choice – (50%)
80 questions
 55 minutes


Free Response –(50%)
Part A: 1 DBQ – (22.5%)
 60 minutes
 Part B: 2 Standard essay questions – (22.5%)
 70 minutes (35 each essay)

Section 1: Multiple Choice
 Breakdown of questions:
 Pre-Columbian to 1789 – 20%
 1790 to 1914 – 45%
 1915 to present – 35%
Expect only a few questions from the period after the early 1980s.
 And even fewer from the past 10 years.

 Theme breakdown:
 Political institutions, behavior, and public policy – 35%
 Social change, cultural and intellectual developments – 40%
 Diplomacy and international relations – 15%
 Economic developments – 10%
Section 2: The Essays (3)
 Total section time – 130 minutes
 DBQ time breakdown
Read the document-based questions – 15 min. (mandatory)
 Written response – 45 min. (advised)


FRQ time breakdown
Part B – to 1865
 Plan essay 1 – 5 min. (advised)
 Written response – 30 min. (advised)
 Part C – after 1865
 Plan essay 1 – 5 min. (advised)
 Written response – 30 min. (advised)

1492 - 1700
Major Themes
 The differences between the Southern, New England, and Middle colonies
 Characteristics of the Puritan experience
 “City Upon a Hill”
 Origins of Slavery
 Indentured servitude and its role in the colonial economy
 The slow evolution from separate colonies to unify by 1763
 Economic and political relations between Great Britain and the colonies to 1763
 Impact of the colonial wars on the colonies on their relationship with Britain
 Mercantilism and the colonies
Terms to Know

Jamestown

Anne Hutchinson

Captain John Smith

Quakers

Plymouth Colony

William Penn

Pilgrims

Mercantilism

Puritans

Navigation Acts

Mayflower Compact
MA Bay Colony

Triangle Trade


John Winthrop

Halfway Covenant

“City Upon a Hill”

First Great Awakening

VA House of Burgesses

Jonathon Edwards

Proprietorship

Salem Witch Trials

George Calvert

John Peter Zenger

Maryland Act of Toleration (1649)

French & Indian War (1756 – 1763)

Bacon’s Rebellion

Albany Plan of Union

Headright System

Treaty of Paris (1763)

Indentured Servitude

Salutary Neglect

Roger Williams
Important Dates: Foundations of America
Southern Colonies
Northern Colonies

1585 – Raleigh founds “Lost Colony” at Roanoke

1620 – Pilgrims sail on the Mayflower to Plymouth Bay

1607 – Virginia Colony founded at Jamestown

1624 – Dutch found New Netherland

1612 – Rolfe perfects tobacco culture

1630 – Puritans found Massachusetts Bay Colony

1635 – 1636 – Roger Williams convicted of heresy and
found Rhode Island colony

1635 – 1638 – Connecticut and New Haven colonies
founded

1638 – Anne Hutchinson banished from Massachusetts
colony

1639 – Connecticut Fundamental Orders drafted

1664 - England seizes New Netherland from Dutch

1681 – William Penn founds Pennsylvania colony

1619 – First Africans arrive in Jamestown


Virginia House of Burgesses established
1624 – Virginia becomes royal colony

1634 – Maryland founded

1670 – Carolina colony created


1712 – North Carolina formally separates from
South Carolina
1733 – Georgia colony founded
Important Dates: Social Changes
 1693 – College of William and Mary founded
 1701 – Yale College founded
 1734 – Jonathon Edwards begins Great Awakening
 1734 – 1735 – Zenger free-press trial in New York
 1738 – George Whitefield spreads Great Awakening
 1746 – Princeton College founded
Important Dates: French and English Colonies Collide

1608 – Champlain colonizes Quebec for France

1682 – La Salle explores the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico

1689 – 1697 – King William’s War

1702 – 1713 – Queen Anne’s War

1718 – French found New Orleans

1744 – 1748 – King George’s War

1754 – Washington battles French on frontier


1754 – 1763 – Seven Year’s War


Albany Congress
French and Indian War
1763 – Treaty of Paris


Pontiac’s uprising
Proclamation of 1763
Columbian Exchange
1763 - 1783
Major Themes

The short- and long-term causes of the American Revolution

Colonial assemblies as leaders against Great Britain

The Revolution was formed by changes in British colonial policy in the 1763-1776 period

The Revolution was brought on by tight economic controls and loose political controls.

The ideas/ideals expressed in the Declaration of Independence.

Several different interpretations by historians on the causes of the American Revolution.

Was the Treaty of Paris (1783) a victory for the U. S.?

How had the 13 separate colonies become similar by the time of the Revolution?

The American Revolution as a democratic revolution turned into an aristocratic government by the Constitution.

The American Revolution as a question of home rule and who should rule at home.

The American Revolution as a revolutionary event --> consider the economic and social changes associated with the
Revolution.

Was the Revolution avoidable?
Terms to Know

Proclamation of 1763

Intolerable [Coercive] Acts (1774)

Sugar Act (1764)

Quebec Act (1774)

Virtual representation

First Continental Congress (1774)

Stamp Act (1765)

Articles of Confederation

Quartering Act (1765)

Second Continental Congress (1775)

Virginia Resolves

Common Sense

Stamp Act Congress

Lexington & Concord

Sons of Liberty

Olive Branch Petition

Writs of assistance

Saratoga

French Alliance of 1778

Loyalists (Tories)

Yorktown (1781)

Treaty of Paris (1783)

Declaratory Act (1766)

Townshend Acts (1767)

Sam Adams

Boston Massacre (1770)

Patrick Henry

John Dickinson

Committees of Correspondence

Boston Tea Party (1773)
Important Dates: Causes of the American Revolution

1650 – First Navigation Laws to control
colonial commerce

1763 – Seven Year’s War

1764 – Sugar Act


1768 – British troops occupy Boston

1770 – Boston Massacre


1772 – Committees of correspondence
formed

1773 – British East India Company
granted tea monopoly
1765 – Quartering Act


Stamp Act
Stamp Act Congress

1766 – Declaratory Act

1767 – Townshend Acts
All Townshend Acts except tea tax
repealed


1774 – “Intolerable Acts”



Boston Tea Party
Quebec Act
First Continental Congress
1775 – Battle of Lexington and Concord
Important Dates: American Revolution
 1775 – Battles of Lexington &
Concord
 1778 – Formation of the French-
American alliance


Second Continental Congress

Battle of Bunker Hill

King George III formally proclaims
colonies in rebellion

Failed invasion of Canada
 1776 – Paine’s Common Sense

Declaration of Independence

Battle of Trenton
 1777 – Battle of Saratoga
Battle of Saratoga
 1781 – French and Americans force
Cornwallis to surrender at
Yorktown
 1783 – Treaty of Paris
British
American Colonies
1776 - 1800
Major Themes

Enlightenment concepts and the Constitution.

How critical was the “Critical Period”?

Compare and contrast the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the Constitution.

Origins of the ideas of separation of powers, written constitutions, and federalism.

Areas of agreement at the Constitutional Convention.

Bill of Rights: provisions and meanings.

Slavery and the Constitution.

Failures of the Constitution led to the evolution of political parties.

Liberty versus law and order in the 1790s.

Hamilton’s economic program.

Thomas Jefferson versus Alexander Hamilton.

Differences between the Democratic-Republicans and the Federalists.

Compare 1763-1776 with 1783-1800 in regard to the relationship between the central government and the colonies or states.

Significance of these election years: 1796 & 1800.

The “Revolution” of 1800.

Loose versus strict construction as a matter of sectional or political interest.

The significance of George Washington’s “Farewell Address”.
Key Terms

Articles of Confederation

Shay’s Rebellion

Annapolis Convention


Judiciary Act (1789)

Report on Public Credit (1790)
Northwest Ordinance of 1787

Report on Manufactures (1791)

Philadelphia Convention (1787)

“Citizen” Genet

James Madison

Alexander Hamilton

Jay Treaty (1794)

Virginia Plan

Whiskey Rebellion (1794)

New Jersey Plan
Connecticut Plan

Washington’s “Farewell Address” (1796)


3/5s Compromise

Democratic-Republican Party

Federalists

XYZ Affair

Anti-Federalists

Strict constructionist

Alien & Sedition Acts (1798)

Loose constructionist

KY & VA Resolutions (1799)

Federalist Papers (esp. #10)

Revolution of 1800
1800 – 1824
THOMAS JEFFERSON
JAMES MADISON
JAMES MONROE
Major Themes

Decline and death of the Federalist Party.

“Era of Good Feeling”.

Marshall and his Supreme Court decisions.

What caused Jeffersonian Democracy to develop?

Compare the Second Party System with the First.

Rise and development of political parties --> economic, social, and geographical characteristics and leaders.

Hamilton’s economic program created the political issues for the next 50 years.

The positions, rationale, issues, and spokesmen for the sections on the following political topics: tariff, banking, internal improvements, expansion, and
slavery.

The significance of the 1824 election.

The War of 1812 as a second War for Independence.

Foreign policy united and divided Americans between 1800 and 1824.

The interests of the West were satisfied by neither the Jeffersonian nor the Federalists between 1789 and 1815.

Provisions and impact of the Monroe Doctrine.

Clay’s “American System”.
Key Terms

Louisiana Purchase

War of 1812

Lewis & Clark

Impressment

Judiciary Act (1801)

Hartford Convention (1814)

“Midnight Judges”

Treaty of Ghent (1814)

Judicial review

Battle of New Orleans

John Marshall

“Era of Good Feeling”

Marbury v. Madison (1803)

Tariff of 1816

Fletcher v. Peck (1810)

Rush-Bagot Agreement (1817)

McCulloch v. Maryland (1819)

Adams-Onis Treaty (1819)

Dartmouth College v. Woodward (1819)
Cohens v. Virginia (1821)

Panic of 1819

Gibbons v. Ogden (1824)


Missouri Compromise of 1820

Aaron Burr

Monroe Doctrine (1823)

Embargo Act (1807)

Erie Canal

Macon’s Bill #2 (1810)

Robert Fulton

War Hawks

Eli Whitney

John C. Calhoun (SC)

Lowell System

Henry Clay (KY)

Denmark Vessey (1822)
The Age of Jackson
1824 – 1840
JOHN QUINCY ADAMS
ANDREW JACKSON
MARTIN VAN BUREN
Antebellum Reform
Westward Expansion &
Sectionalism
1830S – 1860
WILLIAM H. HARRISON
JOHN TYLER
JAMES K. POLK
ZACHARY TAYLOR
MILLARD FILLMORE
FRANKLIN PIERCE
JAMES BUCHANAN
The American Civil War &
Reconstruction
1860 – 1877
ABRAHAM LINCOLN
ANDREW JOHNSON
ULYSSES S. GRANT
RUTHERFORD B. HAYES
Closing the Frontier &
The New South
The Gilded Age
JAMES GARFIELD
CHESTER ARTHUR
GROVER CLEVELAND
BENJAMIN HARRISON
GROVER CLEVELAND
WILLIAM MCKINLEY
American Imperialism
WILLIAM MCKINLEY
THEODORE ROOSEVELT
WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT
WOODROW WILSON

similar documents