Strategies for Creating Success in College and in Life

Report
On Course
Strategies for Creating Success
in College and in Life
Chapter 3
DISCOVERING SELF-MOTIVATION
CHOICES OF SUCCESSFUL STUDENTS
DISCOVERING SELF-MOTIVATION
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3|2
REVIEW: MASTERING
CREATOR LANGUAGE
Indicate whether each of the following statements
is that of a Victim or a Creator.
This grade is so unfair!
I’m going to meet with
the instructor to find out
how to improve.
I’ll never pass this
course.
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I might as well drop out of
college.
I’m going to start a study
team and go to the
tutoring center.
I’ll list at least three
lessons I can learn from
this experience.
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REVIEW
What is the primary goal of this course?
To learn strategies for success in college…and beyond!
List at as many of the eight choices of successful
students as you can.
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Personal Responsibility
Self-Motivation
Self-Management
Interdependence
Self-Awareness
Lifelong Learning
Emotional Intelligence
Belief in Self
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CASE STUDY IN CRITICAL THINKING:
POPSON’S DILEMMA
Do you think it is a professor’s responsibility to motivate
students? Why or Why not?
From which of the professors in this story would you most
want to take a course? Why?
From which professor would you least want to take a
course? Why?
DIVING DEEPER: Is there an approach not mentioned by
one of the eight professors that would be even more
motivating for you?
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CREATING INNER MOTIVATION
FOCUS QUESTIONS
How important do educators think motivation
is to your academic success?
What determines how motivated you are?
What can you do to keep your motivation
consistently high this semester . . . and
beyond?
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FACTORS AFFECTING SELF-MOTIVATION
Self-motivation is greatest when two factors
work together at high levels: Value and
Expectation.
When either factor is low, our motivation is
insufficient to overcome life’s inevitable
obstacles.
When both factors are high, even the
biggest obstacles can’t stop us!
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FORMULA FOR MOTIVATION
VxE=M
"V" represents "Value"
(how important something is to us)
"E" represents "Expectation"
(how confident we are about achieving it)
Multiplying these two factors gives us
"M," our level of "Motivation"
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FORMULA FOR MOTIVATION
EXAMPLE
John’s goal is to earn an "A" in his writing
class.
John wants to be a published author, so this
goal has high Value for him. He gives it a
"10."
John has always done well in writing
classes, so his expectation of success is
also a "10."
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FORMULA FOR MOTIVATION
John’s formula for motivation looks like this:
VxE=M
10 x 10 = 100
Clearly, John’s motivation is very high in his
writing class.
Now let's see John’s motivation for his
biology class...
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FORMULA FOR MOTIVATION
Science has always been a struggle for John because he
hates memorizing facts and terms that he believes are
unimportant to him.
However, John values getting a degree, and he knows he
has to pass a science class with at least a “C” to graduate;
thus, he rates the Value of the biology class to him as a “7.”
Though he’s not excited about taking biology, he is
reasonably confident that he can earn at least a “C.” Thus,
he rates his Expectation of success as a “6.”
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FORMULA FOR MOTIVATION
John’s formula for motivation looks like this:
VxE=M
7 x 6 = 42
Clearly, John’s motivation in biology is not nearly as high
as in his writing class.
If the going gets tough, which course do you think he’ll stop
going to, withdraw from, or fail?
What can John do to raise his motivation in biology?
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QUICK REVIEW: V x E = M
What term refers to the perceived
importance or benefit of a task or goal?
Value
What term refers to the degree to which you
believe you will succeed at a task or goal?
Expectation
When you multiply Value x Expectation, you
get your level of Motivation. How can you
use this knowledge to increase your
motivation in any course?
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JOURNAL ENTRY 8: DIVING DEEPER
1. Pair up!
2. Student A: Read your Journal 8 entry to Student B.
3. Student B: "What I hear you saying is…."
Then, “One question I have is...." Student A answers.
4. Reverse roles and repeat Steps 2 and 3.
5. Continue discussing your levels of motivation to
succeed in college. In particular, identify specific
ways you could raise any motivation levels that are
low.
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ONE STUDENT'S STORY:
Chee Meng Vang
When we lose motivation, it’s easy to make choices
that take us off course. What choices did Chee
Meng Vang make that were sabotaging his success
in college?
What did he do that raised his motivation and how
did that change his choices? (Remember: V x E = M)
If your own motivation slips, what could you do to
raise it?
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3 | 15
DESIGNING A
COMPELLING LIFE PLAN
FOCUS QUESTIONS
If your life were as good as it could possibly
be, what would it look like?
What would you have, do, and be?
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SETTING GOALS
1. Pair up.
2. You will be presented with pairs of goals.
3. With your partner, decide which is the
better goal in each pair and why. Together,
write a list of the qualities of an effective
goal.
Here we go….
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3 | 17
SETTING GOALS
"I'm going to improve my grades."
"By March 1st, I will have an 85 average in my
Algebra class."
"I hate living in the dorms; I'll be glad when I
can get out of here."
"By July 30th, I will have a lease in hand for my
own apartment."
"I wish my kids would quit messing up their
rooms."
"By October 1st, I will develop an 'inspection and
reward' plan for my two kids."
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3 | 18
SETTING GOALS
The next slide presents the five qualities
of motivating goals. See how many of
those qualities are on your list.
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SETTING GOALS
Dated: Specific Deadline
Achievable: Challenging but st
Realistic
"By March 31 ..."
Personal: Yours because You want it
"... IAchievement,
will have annot
85..."
Positive:
Avoidance
Specific: Concrete and Measurable
"... I will submit resumes for three
"...
I will
complete
trainings to
jobs
I would
reallythree
like..."
increase
myispromotion
chances..."
This
the DAPPS
Rule
"... I will weigh
135Positive
pounds..."
Dated Achievable
Personal
Specific
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3 | 20
SETTING GOALS
Achievable?
I'm going to get a starring
role in a major motion
picture this semester.
Achievable?
I'm going to earn key roles in
four major college dramas
by the time I graduate.
I'm going to be president of a
Fortune 500 company by the
time I'm 23 years old.
I'm going to earn an MBA
(Master of Business
Administration) degree
within six years.
I'm going to earn an 'A' in
every design class.
Within two years, I'm going
to have my own line of
designer clothing featured at
Macy's.
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3 | 21
SETTING GOALS
Specific?
Specific
I'm going to make better
grades.
I will earn a 'B' in Calculus.
I'm going to get a good job
someday.
I will research three
employers and prepare
resumes that target each
one.
I need to figure out what I
want to major in.
I will go to the Career
Center and take a career
interest inventory.
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3 | 22
APPLICATION PRACTICE
Identify whether each of these is an example of
applying the DAPPS rule.
"By November 1st, I will raise my Biology
average
YES!
to 85%."
"I'm going to make better grades this semester."
NO
"My parents want me to get a college degree.
NO
"By December 1, I'm going to be registered for
YES!
next semester."
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QUICK REVIEW OF THE DAPPS RULE
D
DATED
A
ACHIEVABLE
P
PERSONAL
P
POSITIVE
S
SPECIFIC
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3 | 24
JOURNAL
ENTRY 9: WARM-UP
1. Write a Long-Term Goal in any of your life
roles.
2. Pair up.
3. Student A: Read your Long-Term Goal to
Student B.
4. Student B: Using the five qualities in the
DAPPS Rule, coach your partner to
improve his or her goal.
5. Reverse roles and repeat Steps 3 and 4.
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3 | 25
COMMITTING TO
YOUR GOALS AND DREAMS
FOCUS QUESTIONS
Do you start new projects (such as college)
with great enthusiasm, only to lose
motivation along the way?
How can you keep your motivation strong?
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3 | 26
JOURNAL 10: WARM UP
On the next slide is a sample visualization. As you read it,
prepare to answer these questions:
What images can you picture from this description?
What sensory words does the writer use?
What emotions come to mind as you read the description?
What would you add or change to make the visualization
more effective for you?
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MY VISUALIZATION
(JOURNAL ENTRY 10)
I get
am a
driving
huge down
grin ona my
back
face
road
and
in start
the Appalachian
laughing out
loud.
foothills, listening to a country music station. It's a
day,a sun
glistening
on autumn
leaves,
Ibeautiful
remember
waitress
at a barbecue
place
in air
crisp and
clean.When
I roll down
the window
feel
North
Carolina.
she came
to takeand
away
mythe
wind on
my arm,her
take
another
Mountain
plate,
I showed
some
lyricssip
I'dof
written
on a Dew.
After a classic
Harris
song,
theradio
DJ one
napkin.
"You'reEmmylou
going to hear
this
on the
announces,
"Here's
a new
song
TimI told
McGraw
day.
It’s called
‘A Mama
Who
Willfrom
Stay,’"
her.
and Faith
Hill,car,
off Itheir
latestout
album.
Riding
in my
chuckle
loud, This
reachone's
over
called
'A the
Mama
Who up
Willa Stay.'
I think you're
gonna
and
turn
volume
bit. A feeling
of
like it."
tremendous
satisfaction washes through me like a
warm breeze. My dream has come true!
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3 | 28
VISUALIZATION
What images can you picture from this
description?
What sensory words does the writer use?
What emotions come to mind as you read
the description?
What would you add or change to make the
visualization more effective for you?
Remember these suggestions when you
write your own visualization.
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3 | 29
FOUR KEYS TO VISUALIZATION
Relax
Use Present Tense
Use All Five Senses
Feel the Feelings
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ONE STUDENT'S STORY:
Amanda Schmeling
For you, what is the most interesting or
useful aspect of Amanda's story? Be
prepared to explain your choice.
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3 | 31
SELF-MOTIVATION AT WORK
1. Create a list of jobs (paid or unpaid) you’ve had
in your life.
2. Pair up.
3. Partner A: Share the list of jobs you've had,
describing what you liked or disliked about each
one.
4. Partner B: Based on this information, identify
careers you think your partner may find
motivating.
5. Reverse Roles and repeat Steps 3 & 4.
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3 | 32
APPLYING THE CONCEPT
Compare these two goal statements:
By September 30th, I will obtain a high paying
job with the fastest growing company in our
metropolitan area.
Beginning May 1st and continuing for ten
weeks, I will send a letter of inquiry and my
resume to five employers each week.
Analyze both goals using the five criteria of the
DAPPS Rule.
What are the pluses and minuses of each goal
statement?
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3 | 33
BELIEVING IN YOURSELF:
WRITING A PERSONAL AFFIRMATION
FOCUS QUESTIONS
What personal qualities will you need to
achieve your dreams?
How can you strengthen these qualities?
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AFFIRMATION MILLING
1. With your affirmation on a card, walk around the
room meeting people for 90 seconds.
2. Greet one person at a time saying, “Hi, I’m [your
name], and I’m a [your affirmation].” Your
partner says, “Yes, you are.” And you say, “I
know!” Now reverse roles and repeat the same
exchange.
3. Find new partners and repeat Step 2.
4. As you say and hear affirmations, be very aware
of your inner conversation as well as how you
feel. Be prepared to report your full experience.
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EMPOWERING YOUR AFFIRMATION
1. Repeat your affirmation.
(Several times a day.)
2. Dispute your Inner Critic.
(Remember a time when you demonstrated a
quality in your affirmation.)
3. Align your words and deeds.
(Each time your actions demonstrate a
quality, you strengthen both the quality and
your belief in possessing the qualities.)
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3 | 36
ONE STUDENT'S STORY:
Donna Ludwick
What did Donna do to help overcome her
doubts and fears about succeeding in college?
What doubts or fears do you have about
your ability to do academic work successfully…or
any other ability?
How could you apply what Donna did to overcome
your own doubts or fears?
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3 | 37
EMBRACING CHANGE
From the list of nine options, choose the one you
think would be most helpful to you.
Organize into groups of people who all chose the
same option.
Explain the reason for your choice, any challenges
you expect, and how you will overcome them.
Team up with one or more “accountability partners.”
Commit to reminding, encouraging, and checking
progress with each other.
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3 | 38
WISE CHOICES IN COLLEGE
What is your level of motivation to do well in
college? Be honest!
How will learning effective study strategies
increase your motivation?
Knowing effective study strategies increases your
expectations of success. (Remember, V x E = M)
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3 | 39
WISE CHOICES IN COLLEGE
1. Examine the strategies in the "Before Taking
Notes" section. Which of these are actions you
already do? Which of the others do you think
would help you the most to improve your
academic performance?
2. Repeat Step 1 for the "While Taking Notes"
and "After Taking Notes" sections.
3. Choose one strategy from each section and
make a personal commitment to use these
three strategies consistently for one week.
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3 | 40
BECOMING AN ACTIVE LEARNER
In pairs, create a concept map for Chapter 3,
placing the Key Concept at the center. (Hint: The
Key Concept is found in the chapter title.)
Now add Main Ideas…then any Secondary Ideas.
Now add Major and Minor Supporting Details.
Compare your concept map with one created by
another pair of students. What can you learn from
theirs?
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3 | 41
REVIEW & SUMMARY
What does the motivation formula reveal about
self-motivation?
Which aspect of the DAPPS rule do you think is
the most important?
How does visualization contribute to selfmotivation and achieving goals?
How does a personal affirmation influence your
expectation of success?
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3 | 42
KEY CHOICES FOR
DISCOVERING SELF-MOTIVATION
Committing to
Your Goals
& Dreams
Designing a
Compelling
Life Plan
Creating
Inner
Motivation
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3 | 43
TICKET OUT
What aspect of discovering selfmotivation seems most challenging to
you? Why?
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3 | 44
End
Chapter
Three
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3 | 45

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