making complete sentences - Community Unit School District 200

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MAKING
COMPLETE
SENTENCES
INDEPENDENT CLAUSES vs.
EVERYTHING ELSE
GRAMMAR BOOTCAMP!
INDEPENDENT CLAUSE = IND
INDEPENDENT CLAUSE = COMPLETE SENTENCE
SUBJECT + PREDICATE = COMPLETE SENTENCE
NOUN + VERB (+ OBJECT+ RECEIVER) =
INDEPENDENT
We will learn to accurately read and deconstruct
essay prompts.
The college application essay is one of several
important factors in the application process.
DEPENDENT CLAUSES, PHRASES, FRAGMENTS,
WORDS = DCW
DCW = NOT A COMPLETE SENTENCE
TYPE #1: DCW starting with one of these words: after,
although, as, before, even though, in order to, since, though,
unless, until, whatever, when, whenever, whether, and while
Examples for TYPE #1:
Although I understood the prompt= DCW
Because college application essays require time = DCW
DEPENDENT CLAUSES, PHRASES,
FRAGMENTS, WORDS = DCW
DCW = NOT A COMPLETE SENTENCE
TYPE #2: DCW starting with verbs.
Practicing reading essay prompts = DCW
Reading articles about the college application
process = DCW
DEPENDENT CLAUSES, PHRASES, FRAGMENTS,
WORDS = DCW
DCW = NOT A COMPLETE SENTENCE
TYPE #3: Non-essentials
Seniors, the best class ever, will ideally resist senioritis!
Our school’s seniors, the most mature group of students, stormed onto
college campuses across our nation, the United States of America!
• In both of these cases, the non-essentials are in the form of
appositives*
We did, just as we planned, complete two essays for our college
applications.
* In this case, the non-essential is in the form of an interrupter.
DEPENDENT CLAUSES, PHRASES, FRAGMENTS,
WORDS = DCW
DCW = NOT A COMPLETE SENTENCE
TYPE #4: DCW that are select transition words:
consequently, clearly, furthermore, in addition,
moreover, also, however, on the other hand,
nevertheless, on the contrary
Clearly, our students are ready to tackle the college
application essays.
Consequently, our students will have a less stressful senior
year because they prepared for their applications over
the summer.
Practice: In the sample below, label all IND and DCW
parts of the sentences. Then, make corrections to any
grammatical/ mechanical errors in the prose.
• When applying to colleges I often remind students that
their responses to the essay prompts are, in essence
like a personal interview with the admissions
committee. That is, they should open up about what’s
important to them and cover topics that are
meaningful and specifically address important items
that may not come up in the rest of the application or
even stress other parts of the application. The essays
are really a reflection of who an applicant is. Often
times students get others to help them craft their
responses, which is fine, but I also remind students not
to lose the essence of who they are. The story still has
to be their own.
GOLDEN RULES: SEPARATE IND vs DCW
(1) IND1, FANBOYS (coordinating conjunctions) IND2
Coordinating conjunctions: FANBOYS (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so)
Juniors are cool, and they are excited for senior year .
Mrs. Delacruz’s best friend is Ms. G, so Ms. G helps Mrs. Delacruz
with her social skills.
Your Example: _____________________________________
(2) IND, DCW
I met with my peer revision partner, knowing I could use their
help.
I annotated for the ACIC model, since I realized it would help me
understand the model more comprehensively.
Your Example: ______________________________________
GOLDEN RULES: SEPARATE IND vs
DCW
(3) IND1, DCW, IND1
Wheaton, our hometown, is a fantastic city.
Your Example: ___________________________
(4) DCW, IND
Even though the seniors are intelligent, they have
more to learn.
Your Example: ___________________________
GOLDEN RULES: SEPARATE IND vs
DCW
Type #5:
IND1 FANBOYS (coordinating conjunctions) DCW
Wheaton North students are ready to learn and
become future leaders.
Your Example: ___________________________
Grammar Bootcamp
Part Two
Semi-colons, colons, and other commas
GOLDEN RULE: SEPARATE IND vs DCW
THE SEMI-COLON
Rule #1: IND1;IND2.
College application essays require research and
critical thinking; one can say that this essay may be
the final determining factor in an application.
NEW IND
Rule #2: IND; DCW,IND.
We have been working hard; however, we still have
much to learn.
GOLDEN RULE: SEPARATE IND vs DCW
COLON
IND: DCW
Rule #1: Use a colon before a DCW that is a list.
– A colon is needed before these phrases: these are, there are, the
following, as follows, such as , these things.
– Ex: We are annotating for SOAPSTone elements, imageryevoking syntax, and variation in syntax.
Rule #2: Use a colon before a DCW or imperative
IND that is an explanation of the IND.
- Ex: There is one golden rule: separate IND and DCW.
- Ex: I had one interest: to get my application essays
completed.
GOLDEN RULE: SEPARATE IND vs DCW
COLON
Rule #3: (Exception to IND:DCW) Use a colon before a
long, formal quotation.
Peter Van Buskirk, a consultant for “The College Admissions
Insider” for the U.S. News & Report, offers this advice
concerning the length of the common application essay:
“Generally speaking, short and concise works the best. Keep in
mind that admissions officers are prone to acting on first
impressions. You don't want them to feel as though they are
laboring to get through your prose. The suggested Common
Application word count is 500. Try to stay as close to it as
possible.”
GOLDEN RULE: SEPARATE IND vs DCW
OTHER COMMA USAGE
Rule #1: Use a comma after every item in a series except the
last. The items in a series may be single words, or phrases,
or clauses.
Ex: We will read commentary from admissions officers from
an array of schools: University of Chicago, University of
Illinois – Urbana – Champaign, Wheaton College, and
Illinois State University.
Rule #2:When two or more adjectives come before a noun,
use a comma after each adjective except the last one.
Ex: It is important to work towards a cogent, creative writing
product.
Practice: In the sample below, label all IND and DCW
parts of the sentences. Then, make corrections to any
grammatical/ mechanical errors in the prose.
This is the one time it really is all about you, colleges
want to know what makes you unique. The essay is a
critical component for our holistic review express
yourself honestly. Review the essay question, and jot
down your immediate personal responses. Don’t Google
the question to see what others have written for their
essays. If you can’t resist at least write your outline first
and stay true to yourself in the final version. The
requested essay topics reflect each college’s interests in
shaping their incoming class. Writing on the requested
essay topic should interest you. Be sure you answer the
specific topic; don’t just tweak a generic essay.
Grammar Bootcamp: Part Three
Common Errors in VERB TENSES
Prepositions & Idioms
Tricky Verbs
Infinitive
Arise
Begin
Choose
Dwell
Flee
Fling
Know
Lay
Lead
Lie (to recline)
Lie (tell fibs)
Ride
Ring
Rise
See
Shrink
Sink
Strive
Swear
Take
Write
Simple Past
Arose
Began
Chose
Dwelt/Dwelled
Fled
Flung
Knew
Laid
Led
Lay
Lied
Rode
Rang
Rose
Saw
Shrank
Sank
Strove/strived
Swore
Took
Wrote
Past Participle
Arisen
Begun
Chosen
Dwelt/Dwelled
Fled
Flung
Known
Laid
Led
Lain
Lied
Ridden
Rung
Risen
Seen
Shrunk
Sunk
Striven/strived
Sworn
Taken
Written
Prepositions & Idiomatic Usage
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He can’t abide _____ the no-spitting rule.
It’s terrible to discriminate against parakeets.
She accused me of stealing.
I have a plan to escape from this prison.
I agreed to eat the broccoli.
There’s no excuse for your behavior.
I apologized _______ losing the hamsters.
You can’t hide _______ your past.
She applied for a credit card.
It was all he’d hoped _______.
She pretends to approve of my boyfriend.
I must insist __________ it.
She argued with the bouncer.
It’s impossible to object _______ her arguments.
I arrived at work ________ noon.
I refuse to participate _____ this discussion.
You believe in ghosts.
Pray for me.
Prepositions & Idiomatic Usage
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He can’t abide by the no-spitting rule.
It’s terrible to discriminate against parakeets.
She accused me of stealing.
I have a plan to escape from this prison.
I agreed to eat the broccoli.
There’s no excuse for your behavior.
I apologized for losing the hamsters.
You can’t hide from your past.
She applied for a credit card.
It was all he’d hoped for.
She pretends to approve of my boyfriend.
I must insist upon it.
She argued with the bouncer.
It’s impossible to object to her arguments.
I arrived at work at noon.
I refuse to participate in this discussion.
You believe in ghosts.
Pray for me.
Prepositions & Idiomatic Usage
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I can’t be blamed ______ your neuroses.
Protect me from evil.
Do you care about me?
Provide me with plenty ____ Skittles.
He’s in charge of grocery shopping.
She stayed home to recover _______ the flu.
Nothing compares to you.
I rely on myself.
What is there to complain ________?
She stared ________ his chest.
He can always count on money __________ his mommy.
He subscribes to several trashy magazines.
Ice cream consists of milk, fat, and sugar.
I succeeded __________ fooling him.
I depend on no one.
Wait for me!
That’s where cats differ ________ dogs. Work with me, people!
Prepositions & Idiomatic Usage
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I can’t be blamed for your neuroses.
Protect me from evil.
Do you care about me?
Provide me with plenty of Skittles.
He’s in charge of grocery shopping.
She stayed home to recover from the flu.
Nothing compares to you.
I rely on myself.
What is there to complain about?
She stared at his chest.
He can always count on money from his mommy.
He subscribes to several trashy magazines.
Ice cream consists of milk, fat, and sugar.
I succeeded in fooling him.
I depend on no one.
Wait for me!
That’s where cats differ from dogs. Work with me, people!
Sentence Constructions: Quick
Reference List
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
IND1, fanboys IND2.
DCW, IND.
IND fanboys DCW.
IND1, DCW, IND1.
IND1; IND2.
IND1; DCW, IND2.
IND: DCW (or IND imperative)

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