NON VALUE ADD

Report
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ASL Training Ltd
Website: WWW.ASL-TRAINING.CO.UK
EMAIL : [email protected]
TEL
: 07879915173
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Lean Methodology
CQI (Wessex Forum) Lecture 11/02/14
Objectives:
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Lean Definitions
Seven Wastes
5s
Work Balance (Yamazumi) Boards
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Lean Definitions
What is Lean?
LEAN: Doing more with less by employing
'lean thinking.' Lean manufacturing involves
never ending efforts to eliminate or reduce
'muda' (Japanese for waste or any activity that
consumes resources without adding value) in
design, manufacturing, distribution, and
customer service processes
http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/l
ean-manufacturing
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Lean Definitions
Value Add?
VALUE ADD: Value-added activities are
what a company strives for. They are the
things customers really want and are
willing to pay for
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Lean Definitions
Non Value Add?
NON VALUE ADD: Activities that do not
contribute to the product or the process
and should therefore be eliminated. Nonvalue added steps are waste.
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Value/Non Value Add Example
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Lets Consider an example of an operator
fitting an wheel onto a vehicle on a
moving line.
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Value/Non Value Add Example
STEPS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Check Screen to see what wheel to be fitted to vehicle.
Pick Correct Tools and wheel nuts
Pick Wheel from chute
Place wheel onto vehicle assembly
Tighten wheel nuts
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Wheel Fit Example
Op Steps
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Vehicle
2
4
5
1
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Wheel Fit Example
OPERATION DESCRIPTION
VALUE ADD
NON VALUE ADD
1. READ SCREEN
2. PICK TOOLS & NUTS
3. PICK WHEEL FROM
CHUTE
4. POSITION WHEEL
5. TIGHTEN WHEEL NUTS
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7 Wastes
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Over-Production
Over-Production
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Simply put, overproduction is to manufacture an item
before it is actually required. Overproduction is highly
costly to a manufacturing plant because it prohibits the
smooth flow of materials and actually degrades quality
and productivity.
Overproduction manufacturing is referred to as “Just in
Case.” This creates excessive lead times, results in high
storage costs, and makes it difficult to detect defects.
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Over-Production
Overproduction
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The simple solution to overproduction is turning off the
tap; this requires a lot of courage because the
problems that overproduction is hiding will be
revealed.
The concept is to schedule and produce only what can
be immediately sold/shipped and improve machine
changeover/set-up capability.
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Inventory
Inventory-money tied up in stock
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Excess inventory tends to hide problems on the plant
floor, which must be identified and resolved in order to
improve operating performance.
Excess inventory increases lead times, consumes
productive floor space, delays the identification of
problems.
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Waiting (queuing)
Waiting- Unnecessary waiting/queuing
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Whenever goods are not moving or being processed, the
waste of waiting occurs. Typically more than 99% of a
product's life in traditional batch-and-queue manufacture
will be spent waiting to be processed.
Much of a product’s lead time is tied up in waiting for
the next operation; this is usually because material flow
is poor, production runs are too long, and distances
between work centres are too great.
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Motion
Motion
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This waste is related to ergonomics and is seen in all
instances of bending, stretching, walking, lifting, and
reaching.
These are also health and safety issues, which in today’s
litigious society are becoming more of a problem for
organizations.
Jobs with excessive motion should be analyzed and
redesigned for improvement with the involvement of
plant personnel.
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Transport
Transport- Excessive transportation & handling
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Transporting product between processes is a cost
incursion which adds no value to the product.
Excessive movement and handling cause damage and
are an opportunity for quality to deteriorate. Material
handlers must be used to transport the materials,
resulting in another organizational cost that adds no
customer value.
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Rework
Rework- defects, errors and mistakes
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Having a direct impact to the bottom line, quality defects
resulting in rework or scrap are a tremendous cost to
organizations.
Associated costs include quarantining inventory, reinspecting, rescheduling, and capacity loss. In many
organizations the total cost of defects is often a
significant percentage of total manufacturing cost.
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Over-processing
Over-processing- unnecessary or over processing
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Often termed as “using a sledgehammer to crack a
nut,” many organizations use expensive high precision
equipment where simpler tools would be sufficient.
This often results in poor plant layout because preceding
or subsequent operations are located far apart.
In addition they encourage high asset utilization (overproduction with minimal changeovers) in order to recover
the high cost of this equipment.
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8th Waste
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8th Waste- Under-utilisation of Human Resources?
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5s
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5 s Approach
5s Technique & Approach
Introduction
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The 5s method is a systematic approach to
establishing and maintaining discipline, order and
housekeeping standards.
With this method, divisions or departments adopt and
implement 5s as a means of improving quality, safety
and productivity.
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Sort
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Sort
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Eliminate all unnecessary
tools, parts, and instructions.
Keep only essential items and
eliminate what is not required,
prioritizing things per
requirements and keeping
them in easily-accessible
places.
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Stabilise
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Stabilise
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There should be a place for
everything and everything
should be in its place. The place
for each item should be clearly
labelled
Items should be arranged in a
manner that promotes efficient
work flow, with equipment used
most often being the most easily
accessible.
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Shine
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Shine
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Clean the workspace and all
equipment, and keep it clean,
tidy and organized. At the end
of each shift, clean the work
area and be sure everything is
Spills, leaks, and other messes
also then become a visual
signal for equipment or process
steps that need attention
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Standardise
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Standardise
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Work practices should be
consistent and standardized.
All work stations for a
particular job should be
identical.
All employees doing the same
job should be able to work in
any station with the same
tools that are in the same
location in every station
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Sustain
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Sustain
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Maintain and review standards.
Once the previous 4 S's have
been established, they become
the new way to operate.
Maintain focus on this new way
and do not allow a gradual
decline back to the old ways.
While thinking about the new
way, also be thinking about yet
better ways
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5 s Tools
5s Tools
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Visual factory
Shadow Boards
Max & Min levels
Red Tag Areas
5s Audits
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5 s Benefits
5s Benefits
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Well disciplined area/workplace
Standardisation
Less wasted time trying to find tools, drawings, etc
Visualisation
Employee ownership/morale
Removal of waste/stock- savings
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Work Balance Boards
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Takt Time
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Your Takt time is the demand rate required by your
customers in number of minutes per part. It is calculated
by dividing you total available work time by the average
number of parts required by the customer.
The Takt time is the speed at which your factory should
run, slower would mean that you would fail to meet
customer demand and faster would cause you to build
inventory. The Takt time of your factory is one of the
most important factors to consider when designing your
processes and work cells.
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Value Add Vs Non Value Add
Value Add Vs Non Value Add
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Work Balance Example
Work Balance Board for Wheel Fit
TAKT TIME
LH
RH
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Questions
Any Questions?
Website: www. asl-training.co.uk
Email:
[email protected]
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Value Stream Analysis
Value Stream Analysis
“Whenever there is a product for a customer there is a
value stream.
The challenge lies in seeing it.”
Definition of Value Stream Analysis
*
Complete descriptive analysis of process flows and a detailed breakdown of value
towards the final product
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High Level Current State Map VO
Marketing
Schedule
__/wk
Customer
Plant
Schedule
MP&L
Suppliers
Press Shop
Body
Construction
Direct Heads 250
Indirect Heads 50
Direct Heads 200
Indirect Heads 30
Paint Shop
Final
Assembly
Direct Heads 200
Indirect Heads 30
Direct Heads 700
Indirect Heads 50
Staff 15
32shifts
Shifts
Staff 15
32shifts
Shifts
Staff 30
33shifts
Shifts
Staff 15
32shifts
Shifts
75600 secs avail
50400 secs avail
50400 secs avail
50400 secs avail
C/O 7200 secs
OEE 75%
Stampings
C/O 0 secs
OEE 45%
Bodies, Doors etc
C/O 0 secs
OEE 80%
Bodies, Doors etc
C/O 0 secs
OEE N/A
Assy’ Vehicles
3 Days
21600 Secs
__pcs
__day
__pcs
__day
5 Days
3600 secs
21600 Secs
__pcs
__day
__pcs
__day
120 secs
21600 Secs
10 Days
21600 Secs
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Value Stream Analysis
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Value Stream Mapping covers the whole of the
manufacturing processes from raw material to the
shipment of finished goods.
This may mean looking beyond the boundaries of the
plant to suppliers and out to the customer.
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Value Stream Analysis
What can we learn from a VSA?
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Lead times
Process times
Buffers sizes
Number of personnel
Constraints
Value/Non Value Add processes
Plan for future changes- Future state map
Max/min levels
Delivery times
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