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Growing Personally In The
Course Of Life’s Challenges
 Some life lessons from critical skills training in profit
oriented business and industry
 Wesley Stillwagon

Copyright, © 2011, Wesley W. Stillwagon, Sr. All rights reserved.
“If a man is capable of living a responsible life himself, then he is conscious of his
duties to the community.” Carl G. Jung, Ph.D. M.D.
Growing Personally In The Course
Of Life’s Challenges
Objectives
Introduce and reinforce the vision of ourselves as maturing
or evolving individuals;
2. Introduce language, concepts, and a systematic approach to:
1.
 Understanding life; and,
 Responding to its opportunities, gifts, and challenges.
3.
Introduce useful concepts, tools, and models to:
 Define reasonable life growth goals;
 Determine where we are with respect to those goals;
 Develop a reasonable life path between where one is and where
they want to be;
 To track progress; and,
 Confidently decide when the goals have been met.
How did I get here?
Training and
Development
Trainee Success
Given the same:
 Entry path to learning;
 Information;
 Demonstration;
 Guidance;
 Critique
 Feedback; and,
 Motivation
Trainee Success
Given the same:
 Entry path to learning;
 Information;
 Demonstration;
 Guidance;
 Critique
 Feedback; and,
 Motivation
Simple Task
Stick Him,
Dude! (Cue)
Stick Him,
Dude! (Cue)
Cue
Process
Standard
Simple Task
Cue
Process
Standard
Simple Task
Cue
Process
Standard
Simple Task
Cue
Process
Standard
Simple Task
Cue
Process
Standard
Simple Task
Didn’t
Work. I
Must
Review
Process!
Cue
Didn’t Work.
I Must
Review
Process!
Process
Standard
Simple Task
Process
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Wait for order to start procedure (Cue)
Wait until opponent is close enough
Stick him
Make sure he won’t cause trouble again (standard)
Go to help other team members
Cue
Process
Standard
Simple Task
Fat chance
Dude!
Would you
kindly stand
close enough
that I may
stick you?
Cue
Process
Standard
Human Cognitive
Complex
Knowledge
Skills
Attributes
KSA’s
Human Cognitive
Complex
Knowledge
Skills
Attributes
Humsn Cognitive
Complex
Skills
Knowledge
Attributes
Human Cognitive
Complex
Skills
Knowledge
Occam’s Razor
Attributes
Human Cognitive
Complex
Skills
Knowledge
Attributes
Human Cognitive
Complex
Knowledge
Skills
Attributes
HumanCognitive
Complex
Knowledge
Skills
Attributes
Is the Know what, know how, or know where (I.e. location
and use of reference available to the job holder for
competent execution of a job task.
Sergeant Major
John Oberlin,
Forth Monmouth, NJ
The Task And The Self
Cue
Tells
employee
to begin.
Follow
Process
Achieve
Goal
Rework
Copyright ©2001 Wesley W. Stillwagon. All rights
reserved.
Standard
?
The Task And The Self
No Cue
Begun
based upon
Initiative,
analysis,
synthesis.
Process
Clear
Goal
Rework
Copyright ©2001 Wesley W. Stillwagon. All rights
reserved.
Standard
?
The Task And The Self
No Cue
No
Process
Clear
Goal
Rework
Copyright ©2001 Wesley W. Stillwagon. All rights
reserved.
Standard
?
The Task And The Self
No Cue
No
Process
No clear
Goal
Rework
Copyright ©2001 Wesley W. Stillwagon. All rights
reserved.
No
Standard
Cognitive Process
Knowledge
Skills
Attributes
Skills
are the actions a job holder must employ to complete the
work tasks. They would use not only their knowledge but
would apply the knowledge to actions necessary to
achieve objectives – to create a measurable product or
accomplishment.
If one is able to consistently meet the standards for the
task, they are considered competent. “Competent”
means that the value of their work as measured by the
accomplishment consistently exceeds the cost of the
behavior and resources.
“Worthy Performance”
Value of
Accomplishment
Is Grea ter than
Apparent Cost in
Resources
W = V/C*
*Thomas F. Gilbert, Ph.D.
Cognitive Process
Knowledge
Skills
Attributes
Attributes
Personal attributes consistently distinguish one job holder from
another with equal knowledge and basic skills and may
include:
 Exceptional attention to detail;
 Excellent interpersonal effectiveness;
 Exceptional awareness of prevailing community attitude;
 Excellent logic or value judgment;
 Astute perception;
 Willingness to take risks and to make decisions in the face of
those risks;
 Visual acuity;
 Hearing ability
Jung’s Pebble Analogy
The Collective
The Individual
Jung’s Pebble Analogy
 Color;
 Shape;
 Texture;
 Hardness;
 Weight; and,
 Transparency.
KSA’s and The
Individual
Knowledge
Skills
Attributes
The Individual
Instructional Systems
Design
1. Analysis;
2. Report/proposal, economic justification (Cost/Benefit)
3. Approval
4. Development
5. Delivery
6. Measure against proposal performance objectives.
Fact
Work Issues and
Challenges
Challenges and Issues
Outside of Work
Patterns, Purpose, and Plan
Publications:
Practical Applications:
Practical Applications:
Unconscious to Almost
Completely Conscious
“Man started from an unconscious state and has
ever striven for greater consciousness. The
development of consciousness is the burden, the
suffering, and the blessing of mankind.” C. G. Jung,
New York Times interview, September, 1912.
Conscious
Unconscious
Adult Maturity
High
Medium
Level one
•No sense of self
•No sense of
individuality
•Identify with gods they
have projected on to the
world
•Ego very weak
•Very Unconscious
•Easily influenced for good
or bad
Population
High
Low
Low
Slightly modified for relevance from The
Gnostic Jung, by Rober A. Segal, Published by
Mythos, The Princeton/Bollingen Series in
World Mythology
Adult Maturity
High
Level two
•Mainly Unconscious
•Ego Stronger
•Project on gods distinct and
external to themselves
•Cannot distinguish rhetoric
or innuendo from fact
Medium
Population
High
Low
Low
Slightly modified for relevance from The
Gnostic Jung, by Rober A. Segal, Published by
Mythos, The Princeton/Bollingen Series in
World Mythology
Adult Maturity
High
Level three
•Ego stronger and fully
integrated
•Complete denial of
Unconscious (still
unconsciously project upon
the world)
Medium
Population
High
Low
Low
Slightly modified for relevance from The
Gnostic Jung, by Rober A. Segal, Published by
Mythos, The Princeton/Bollingen Series in
World Mythology
Adult Maturity
High
High
Medium
Population
Level four
•Individuated,
•Experienced Break Thru
•Self-actuated
•Seeking to re-connect with
Unconscious, soul, and Spirit
Low
Low
Slightly modified for relevance from The
Gnostic Jung, by Rober A. Segal, Published by
Mythos, The Princeton/Bollingen Series in
World Mythology
Unconscious to Almost
Completely Conscious
Can we ever achieve complete consciousness?
Unconscious to Almost
Completely Conscious
Unconscious to Almost
Completely Conscious
“The
world comes into being when man
discovers it. But he only discovers it when he
sacrifices his containment in the primal mother,
the original state of unconscious.” C. G. Jung,
“Symbols of Transformation”, Collected Works,
Vol. 5, Princeton University Press
Used with written permission of Princeton University Press.
How Do We Get There?
Philosopher’s Gold
"My studies of alchemy may
seem obscure and baffle many
people, but taken symbolically
- the symbolic gold of great
worth, or the transforming
philosopher's stone 'lapis
philosophorum' hunted for
centuries by the alchemists - is
to be found in man.“ Carl G.
Jung, M.D., Ph.D.
Copyright 1997 Wesley W. Stillwagon, Sr. All rights reserved
Leisurely Selfinventory
Copyright ©2001 Wesley W. Stillwagon. All rights
reserved.
Language
and Concepts
Concepts and
Language to
Support:










Visualization;
Understand
Defining;
Describing;
Reporting;
Diagramming;
Mapping;
Tracking;
Evaluating; and,
Quantifying
Where do we begin?
1. Determine where you
2.
3.
4.
5.
are;
Decide where you want
to be;
Visualize a realistic path
between those two
points;
Develop a plan; and,
Begin the journey.
Copyright ©2001 Wesley W. Stillwagon. All rights reserved.
Copyright 1997 Wesley W. Stillwagon, Sr. All rights reserved
Where do we begin?
Leisurely Selfinventory
Copyright ©2001 Wesley W. Stillwagon. All rights
reserved.
Copyright 1997 Wesley W. Stillwagon, Sr. All rights reserved
The Persona
Image we project to
or is perceived by
others
Copyright ©2001 Wesley W. Stillwagon. All rights
reserved.
Where do we begin?
Copyright 1997 Wesley W. Stillwagon, Sr. All rights reserved
Partially
An
Illusion
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reserved.
The Persona
The image we consciously and unconsciously present to others.
Identifying with The Persona
Persona
Persona
Persona
Public is the side
that we show to
and that is seen by
others. This is part
of the persona.
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reserved.
Persona
Private the side
that we keep to
ourselves.
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reserved.
Persona
Blind others see
but of which we are
un aware. This too
is part of the
Persona.
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reserved.
Persona
Unknown others
do not see and of
which we are
unaware.
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reserved.
Leisurely Self-inventory
Have we identified with
the Persona?
Unknown
The Ego
Copyright ©2001 Wesley W. Stillwagon. All rights
reserved.
Ego
 The conscious image of one’s self
 The focal point to which objects of perception must relate
to be “conscious”
 Not the Self in total
Ego
C. G. Jung (not a verbatum quote):
 a complex of ideas which constitutes the centre of
the field of consciousness
 it is not identical with the totality of the psyche
 appears to possess a high degree of continuity and
identity... (I’d like to add that we live in a world filled
with people who are mainly unconscious with
absolutely no idea about their uniqueness);
 one complex among other complexes
 distinguished between the ego and the Self,
Unconscious
 covers all psychic contents or processes that are not





conscious,
includes more than one layer: 1) the personal and the 2)
collective.
May include an interpersonal layer as well
John Steinbeck’s phalanx is the name of the influence
highway of the complex called the “collective unconscious”.
An important influencing component of the totality of the
human psyche called the Self
Infinitely more complex and influential concept then defined
simply as the absence of consciousness.
Unconscious
If the unconscious is unknown or unobservable, how do
we know it exists?
Because we can observe the influences on our
1.
perceptions,
2.
judgments,
3.
decisions, and
4.
behaviors
In manners not given to rational explanation like the appearance of
words, images, powerful drives, and other influences including
intuitions.
The influence of the unconscious may be demonstrated via free
association surveys, slips of the tongue, and word association tests.
Leisurely Self-inventory











Seeking Perfection
Live to Work
Oriented toward the details
Happier with the face-to-face
Prefer considering the logistics
By observation others consider
rational
Rely more on judgment
Prefer the plan
Prefer pursuing the objective
Prefer leading
Comfortable with sexuality
Or











Seeking Completeness
Work to Live
Oriented to the big picture
Happier in the social
Impact on Population
Irrational (by observation)
Rely more on perceiving
Prefer considering the history
Enjoy living the Experience
Prefer serving
Uncomfortable with sexuality
Leisurely Self-inventory
Sometimes it is just as important
to know who we ARE NOT as
who we ARE. Knowing who we
are not provides a better
definition of who we are.
Growth Perspective
Consider growth from a different perspective;
that is as:
1. yourself as a unique Individual
2. yourself as you relate or react in the
Interpersonal
3. yourself as you relate or react within the
Social, Team, and Family environments
4. by what you can or cannot do well perhaps
as measured by your accomplishments
Copyright ©2001 Wesley W. Stillwagon. All rights
reserved.
Leisurely Self-inventory
The moment that we consider
such things, we’ve begun to
build a useful Self-image or an
Ego.
Unknown
Copyright 1997 Wesley W. Stillwagon, Sr. All rights reserved
Leisurely Self-inventory
Copyright ©2001 Wesley W. Stillwagon. All rights
reserved.
The Ego is the
known part of an
individual’s Self or
the part of our Self
of which we may
be conscious.
Leisurely Self-inventory
If we’ve begun to consider such
things, we’ve started to build a useful
self-image. As a result of this we will
have something manageable or useful
to work with as we grow.
Leisurely Self-inventory
A leisurely Self-inventory relying only on
personal reflection can yield limited results.
Improve objectivity by:
•Reviewing your theories with friends and family;
•Take an objective style survey or do what you
may to consider who you are as objectively as
you can.
Leisurely Self-inventory
Your
Self-inventory Goal
Random leisurely
relying only on personal reflection can
yield limited results.
•Run self-theories by friends and
family;
•Take style surveys like the MyersBriggs Type Inventory.
Improve The Individual
Style Survey
Instruments
Popular Style/Type Surveys like
MBTI
 Asks your subjective opinion,
prediction, or theory regarding
your response to survey
question;
 Produces pseudo-acronyms
and limited two dimensional
explanations (ESTJ, INFP);
 Appeals to humanists; and
 Requires consideration of more
than 100 questions.
Objective Style Survey
 Puts you into the situation and
objectively measures results or
response;
 Produces results in practical
and useful language;
 Functional Style and Strength
 Habitual attitude
 Adult Maturity;
Appeals to everyone with
practical language and useful
results; and,
 Possible to achieve in fewer
questions
Jung and Steinbeck
Jung and Steinbeck
Jung and Steinbeck
The Individual Psyche
Functional Attributes
• Logic
• Plan
• Social
• Immediate
• Here and Now
• Details
• Broad Time
• Big Picture
• Synthesis
Think
Intuit
Sense
Feel
• Value
• History
• Interpersonal
Psychological Types
• Logic
• Plan
• Social
• Immediate
• Here and Now
• Details
• Broad Time
• Big Picture
• Synthesis
Think
Intuit
Sense
Feel
• Value
• History
• Interpersonal
Psychological Types
• Logic
• Plan
• Social
• Immediate
• Here and Now
• Details
• Broad Time
• Big Picture
• Synthesis
Thinker
Intuitor
Sensor
Feeler
• Value
• History
• Interpersonal
Psychological Types
• Logic
• Plan
• Social
• Immediate
• Here and Now
• Details
• Broad Time
• Big Picture
• Synthesis
Thinker
Intuitor
Sensor
Feeler
• Value
• History
• Interpersonal
Psychological Types
• Logic
• Plan
• Social
• Immediate
• Here and Now
• Details
• Broad Time
• Big Picture
• Synthesis
Thinker
Intuitor
Sensor
Feeler
• Value
• History
• Interpersonal
Psychological Types
Goal Oriented,
Objective or
Thinker
Intuitor
Extraverted
• Logic
• Plan
• Social
• Broad Time
• Big Picture
• Synthesis
Sensor
• Immediate
• Here and Now
• Details
Feeler
• Value
• History
• Interpersonal
Psychological Types
• Logic
• Plan
• Social
• Broad Time
• Big Picture
• Synthesis
Thinker
Intuitor
Experience,
Sensor
Feeler
Subjective or
Introverted
• Immediate
• Here and Now
• Details
• Value
• History
• Interpersonal
The Phalanx
External Influences and Goals
People,
Logic,
History
Planning
Internal
Communication
and Transactions
Synthesis,
Strategy
Possibilities,
Public Opinion
Copyright ©2001 Wesley W. Stillwagon. All rights
reserved.
Critical
Details
Psychologic al Types
in play
Logic
Cold,
no compassion!
Planning
People
T
F
Copyright ©2001 Wesley W. Stillwagon. All rights
reserved.
History
Psychologic al Types
in play
Strategy,
Long term
plans
A Dreamer not a doer!
Here and
I
S
Copyright ©2001 Wesley W. Stillwagon. All rights
reserved.
Now!
The Phalanx
People,
Logic,
History
If this
fails…
Synthesis,
Strategy
Planning
Internal
Communication
and Transactions
Possibilities,
Public Opinion
Copyright ©2001 Wesley W. Stillwagon. All rights
reserved.
Critical
Details
The Phalanx
The Team Fails
Adult Maturity
Functional styles or types
are part of our “Self”
regardless of our adult
maturity or individuation
leve. How we treat that
part of ourselves
dramatically influences the
quality of our lives both
personally and
interpersonally.
High
Medium
Low
Low
Population
High
The Phalanx, Evolvement
and And Type
High
Thinker
Medium
Sensor
Low
Top
View
Feeler
Intuitor
The Phalanx, Evolvement
and And Type
High
Thinker
Medium
Sensor
Top
Low
View
Feeler
Intuitor
The Phalanx, Evolvement
and And Type
High
Medium
Convergence
Thinker
Low
Top
Intuitor
Sensor
Feeler
View
The Phalanx,
Evolvement
and And
High
Type






Individual
Less fear
Increased confidence
Increased
knowledge,
Improved skills, and
more effective
attributes
Increased
independence
Medium
Interpersonal
 More effective teaming
 Better communication
Thinker
Low
Top
Intuitor
Sensor
Feeler
View
Convergence
Integration
Completeness
Individuated
 Less friction and
negative politics
 Less inflated Ego
influence
 Better partnering
 Improved economics
 Less supervision
 Lower overhead
The Phalanx
People,
Logic,
History
Planning
Internal
Communication
and Transactions
Synthesis,
Strategy
Possibilities,
Public Opinion
Infinitely more powerful and effective
Copyright ©2001 Wesley W. Stillwagon. All rights
reserved.
Critical
Details
Copyright 1997 Wesley W. Stillwagon, Sr. All rights reserved
The Shadow
Copyright ©2001 Wesley W. Stillwagon. All rights
reserved.
Steinbeck’s Phalanx
Steinbeck’s Phalanx
"We know that with certain arrangement of atoms we might
have what we would call a bar of iron. Certain other
arrangements of atoms plus a mysterious principle make a living
cell. Now the living cell is very sensitive to outside stimuli or
tropisms. A further arrangement of cells and a very complex one
may make a unit we call a man. That has been our final unit. But
there have been mysterious things which could not be explained
if man is the final unit. He also arranges himself into larger units,
which I called the phalanx. The phalanx has its own memory-memory of the great tides when the moon was close, memory of
starvations when the food in the world was exhausted. Memory
of methods when numbers of his units had to be destroyed for
the good of the whole, memory of the history of itself.“ John
Steinbeck, in a letter to his friend, George Albee.
Steinbeck’s Phalanx
"To the casual observer Cannery Row might have
seemed a series of selfish units, each functioning alone
with no reference to the others. There was little visible
connection between (the bordellos), La Ida's and the
Bear Flag, the grocery (still known as Lee Chong's
Heavenly Flower Grocery), the Palace Flophouse, and
Western Biological Laboratories. The fact is that each
was bound by gossamer threads of steel to all the
others--hurt one, and you aroused vengeance in all. Let
sadness come to one, and all wept." John Steinbeck,
“Sweet Thursday”
Steinbeck’s Phalanx
 Group, mob, etc. may take on a psychology quite
different from that of its individual members
 the group psychology is a (sometimes
antagonistic) counterpoint to individual
psychology.
 The group psychology may cause individual
members in a manner that they otherwise would
not consider.
Steinbeck’s Phalanx
Here I will add my own observations:
•The group psychology may have a reaction
similar to a shadow between two individuals,
except in this case, it is the group against the
individual, or class.
•The higher the adult development, or
individuation of the individual members of the
group or mob, the less potential for negative or
destructive influences of the phalanx on the
group’s behavior. (What was wrong in Germany
in the 1930s?)
John Steinbeck
“The attack on us set in motion the most powerful species
drive we know—that of survival. It created direction
toward which we could aim all of our vitalities—and we
have great vitality. What the Axis could not understand was
that the measure of our unrest was the measure of our
vitality. The war was dumped in our laps; we could not
avoid it, but fortunately for us, we have been given a kind
of war we are peculiarly capable of fighting—a war without
established technique or method, a kind of war rooted in
production in which we surpass. If we ourselves had
chosen the kind of war to be fought, we could not have
found one more suitable to our national genius. For this is
a war of transport, of machines, of mass production, of
flexibility, and of inventiveness, and in each of these fields
we have been pioneers if not actual inventors.” from
“Bombs Away” by John Steinbeck © 1942 John Steinbeck
The Gathering Place
Informal
Gathering Place
 No invitation or schedule
 Freedom to come and go as pleased
 Participants may arrive harboring no expectations or
desires beyond camaraderie, intellectual discourse, and
friendship
 Supportive and safe social environment
from “Sweet Thursday”:
“in the Palace Flophouse a little meeting
occurred – occurred, because no one called it,
no one planned it, and yet everyone knew
what it was about.”
John Steinbeck
Jim Kent
“Doc’s Lab
Myth and Legends of Cannery
Row”
By Ed Larsh
Jim Kent
Social Capital
Jim Kent
Gathering Place
Kent’s Roles and Jung’s
Types
Think of the advantages of combining
Jung’s Types and Kent’s Gathering Place
roles!!!
Copyright © James Kent, JD, All rights reserved
Jung’s Types
Kent’s Roles and Jung’s
Types
In doing so, it would enable us to
•better understanding the role player’s driving
forces, perception, judgment, etc.
• predict in greater detail who would naturally
accept and successfully fulfill the roles
•guide the role player or to assist them in
achieving effectiveness.
A Diverse Team
People,
Logic,
History
Planning
Critical
Synthesis,
Strategy
Possibilities,
Public Opinion
Details
Diversity, Strength, and
Economy
Value of
Accomplishment
Is Grea ter than
Apparent Cost in
Resources
W = V/C*
*Thomas F. Gilbert, Ph.D.
Diversity and Strength
Hitler
Tojo
The Phalanx
People,
Logic,
History
If this fails…
Planning
Internal
Communication
and Transactions
Synthesis,
Strategy
Possibilities,
Public Opinion
Copyright ©2001 Wesley W. Stillwagon. All rights
reserved.
Critical
Details
Resources For
Improvement
Improve the Team
Improve the Individual
 Develop and Demand
 Provide means for self-
compliance to a list of oughts
and musts;
 Legislate compliance with
threats of cruel punishment for
violating;
 Establish neighborhood
compliance and oversight
committees.
evaluation;
 Provide tools to establish
individual goals, maps, paths,
and plans;
 Show individuals how to track
and measure progress and how
to manage resources.
Improve The Individual
Provide tools for self evaluation including:
 Models, concepts, and tools for self-evaluation
 Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI);
 Other tools like Astrology from a competent Astrologist
Improve The Individual
Provide
 Tools, models, and concepts to establish individual goals,
maps, paths, and plans;
 Determine if goals are reasonable;
 Techniques to define maps and paths; and,
 Techniques for planning a reasonable development path.
Improve The Individual
Provide tools to:
 track and measure progress;
 manage resources.
Astrology
 More important today than ever
 A key self-discovery tool for Individuation
 Discover
 who you are
 where you want to be and
 how to get there
 Useful in mapping, diagramming, and understanding
relationships



More complete form of astromancy. Other tools used to predict
events.
Humanistic Astrology interpretations built around how the event
impacts the individual. The Individual Human Psyche is held central
to the interpretation and key to influencing future events
More Scientific and therefore easier to teach
Synchronicity
“What ever is done or
begun at a given
moment in time has the
qualities of that given
moment of time.” Carl
G. Jung, MD, PhD
Synchronicity
“What ever is done or
begun at a given
moment in time has the
qualities of that given
moment of time.” Carl
G. Jung, MD, PhD
Synchronicity
“What ever is done (a
static quality) or begun
(a dynamic quality) at a
given moment in time
has the qualities of that
given moment of time.”
Carl G. Jung, MD, PhD
Solar System
Celestial Equator
Complex Clock
How can stars and planets millions of miles
and light years away influence life and
events on the Earth?
Wheel Chart
What Astrologers Cannot Do:
If we look at astrological prediction with intellectual honesty, I believe that will
realize that when the astrologer predicts future events he is rarely able to pinpoint:



exactly what the events will be
precisely what circumstances will take place, and
how they will affect the psycho-physiological health of
the person.
Prediction Cautions
 Once uttered, a prediction becomes an integral part of
the whole situation it forecasts.
 Astrologers cannot separate themselves from the
situations they predict
 they cannot predict the effect of their predictions.
Basis of Interpretation
 Symbolic understanding of individual element
 Analysis of element relationships I.e.
 Planets in Signs within Houses
 Signs at House Cusps and with House
 Planets angle to Planets, House Cusps
 Synthesis or using intuition to tie elements together not
apparent to the senses or appealing to logic or reason.
Interpretation
Difficulty
Interpretor’s:
 Knowledge,
 Skills,
 Atributes (I.e. Perception, Judgment, Decision Making,
Problem Solving)
 Teleogocal Perspective
Interpreter’s Teleogical Perspective
•Passion,
•Prejudice,
•Hopes,
•Wishes,
•Desires,
•Expectations,
•Profit
Element Hierarchy
 Analytical Interpretation (What it does, what it does not
do or influence, not how or why)
 Symbolism and Metaphor
 Abstractions
 Archetypal Influence (Unknowable Directly like the Tao)
Psychological Attitudes
Extravert (+) and Introvert (-)


+
_
Ascendant
Persona
_
_
+S
+
T
_


Q
_
Q
I +
_
_


+
C
F
_

D
+E


Astrology?
 "Astrology is assured of recognition from psychology
without further restrictions. Astrology represents the
summation of all the psychological knowledge of
antiquity."
 "The fact that it is possible to construct a person's
characteristics from the data of his nativity shows the
validity of astrology. I have often found that in cases of
difficult psychological diagnosis, astrological data
elucidated points which I otherwise would have been
unable to understand.“
Carl G. Jung, M.D. Ph.D
Astrology?
The Phalanx
External Influences and Goals
People,
Logic,
History
Planning
Internal
Communication
and Transactions
Synthesis,
Strategy
Possibilities,
Public Opinion
Copyright ©2001 Wesley W. Stillwagon. All rights
reserved.
Critical
Details
HPE Difference
 Program focus is directed at individual:
 Style (Type)
 Habitual attitude (Extraversion, Introversion)
 Evolvement Level, Unconscious Vs. Conscious
 Knowledge
 Skills
 Interpersonal effectiveness
 Measure by accomplishment not simply memory-recall
HPE Difference
 Less Classroom
 More individual or personal responsibility
 More practice through demonstration, simulation, peer
review
 Design is a combined effort between human performance
engineer and technical subject matter experts.
HPE Concept Potential
 Improved training for complex and critical tasks and
assignments with;
 Improved simulations and critique;
 More individual development responsibility (less
expensive development or performance ramp-up costs)
Additional HPE Benefits
 Improved individual Self-knowledge and confidence;
 Trainees take increased personal knowledge and skills with
them to other life challenges;
 Just imagine:
 If a computer game or simulation could modify paths, challenges,
rewards, and punishments based upon accumulating an accurate
and objective personal picture of the player or participant.
 computer games or simulations that could more precisely
emulate the behavior of opponents, subordinates, enemies,
supporters, or comrades.
 More accurate predictions of employee progress to competency;
 More specialized training based upon trainee style, type, and
maturity.
Think and Reflect about
these things
Thank you
Questions, comments, concerns:
(910) 814-1599 Home
(910) 514-0333 Cell
[email protected]
There is so much more to talk
about.

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