APPR SLO Update FACS - CTE Technical Assistance Center of

Report
www.nyctecenter.org
APPR &
STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES
An Update
Constance Spohn, Lead Technical Assistance Specialist
Carol Ann Zygo, Field Associate Central and Northern NY
Successful Practices Network
www.nyctecenter.org
Presenter
Dr. Constance Spohn,
Lead Technical Assistance Specialist
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CTE Technical Assistance Center
Successful Practices Network (current)
Retired (2 weeks)
Interim Elementary Principal, Fonda-Fultonville CSD
Director of Special Programs, Fonda-Fultonville CSD (8 yrs)
Online Instructor, VTP SUNY Oswego (current)
Coordinator Montgomery Co. 21st CCLC (2 yrs)
Director, Two Year College Development Center, Univ. @ Albany(5yrs)
Greater Capital District Tech Prep Consortium Coordinator (9 yrs)
Professor, Early Childhood, SUNY Cobleskill (10 yrs)
Instructor; Early Childhood, Foods, Clothing Services, Madison Oneida
BOCES (7 yrs)
2
Successful Practices Network
www.nyctecenter.org
Presenter
Carol Zygo, Field Team Associate
NYS CTE Technical Assistance Center
•
•
•
•
•
CTE Technical Assistance Center (current)
Successful Practices Network (current)
Superintendent, Herkimer CSD (6 years)
Principal, Oriskany CSD (10 years)
Model Schools Coordinator, Madison-Oneida
BOCES (3 years)
• Business Teacher (17 years)
• College Instructor (Utica College)
Successful Practices Network
www.nyctecenter.org
CTE TAC
Background & Purpose
State Contract to assist SED in carrying out
its mission of improving the quality, access,
and delivery of CTE through research-based
methods and strategies resulting in broader
CTE opportunities for all students.
4
Successful Practices Network
www.nyctecenter.org
CTE TAC Work Plan
1.
Improve CTE data collection to create an accurate picture
of career and technical education program performance
2.
Assist schools in the integration of the new national
common core state standards with CTE.
3.
Expand CTE program approvals.
4.
Use best practices in CTE for high school improvement.
5.
Expand CTE programs and student leadership
participation
6.
Build relationships and networks to strengthen CTE.
5
Successful Practices Network
www.nyctecenter.org
6
Successful Practices Network
www.nyctecenter.org
The Challenges
• Common Core State Standards (CCSS)
• Next Generation Assessments (NGA)
• Teacher Evaluation Based on Student Performance
• Principal Evaluation Based on Student Performance
• Prepare Students for the World Beyond School
Successful Practices Network
www.nyctecenter.org
Animating the Reform Agenda
Investing in human capital, supporting with critical tools
Highly Effective
School Leaders
Highly Effective
Teachers
Successful Practices Network
College and
Career Ready
Students
 Adopting internationallybenchmarked standards and
assessments that prepare students
for success in college and the
workplace (Common Core)
 Building instructional data systems
that measure student success and
inform teachers and principals how
they can improve their practice
(DDI)
 Recruiting, developing, retaining,
and rewarding effective teachers
and principals (APPR)
 Turning around the lowestachieving schools
2
www.nyctecenter.org
Animating the Reform Agenda
Investing in human capital, supporting with critical tools
Teacher Evaluation Components
Highly Effective
School Leaders
Measures of
Growth
(20%)
Grades
4-8 ELA
Math
LocallyOther
selected
Measures
measures of (60%)
student
achievement
(20%)
All
Other
Successful Practices Network
Highly Effective
Teachers
College and
Career Ready
Students
3
www.nyctecenter.org
Standard 4: Learning Environment
New York State Teaching Standards
And Elements
4.1 Creates a mutually respectful, safe, and supportive learning environment that is
inclusive of every student
4.2 Creates an intellectually challenging and stimulating learning environment
4.3 Manages the learning environment for the effective operation of the classroom
4.4 Organize and utilize available resources [e.g. physical space, time, people, technology]
to create a safe and productive learning environment
Standard 1: Knowledge of Students & Student Learning
Standard 5: Assessment for Student Learning
Standard 2: Knowledge of Content and Instructional Planning
Standard 6: Professional Responsibilities and Collaboration
Standard 3: Instructional Practice
Standard 7: Professional Growth
1.1 Knowledge of child and adolescent development, including students’ cognitive,
language, social, emotional, and physical developmental levels
1.2 Knowledge of current, research‐based knowledge of learning and language
acquisition theories and processes
1.3 Knowledge of and responsive to diverse learning needs, interests, and experiences of
all students
1.4 Knowledge of individual students from students, families, guardians, and/or
caregivers to enhance student learning
1.5 Knowledge of and responsive to the economic, social, cultural, linguistic, family, and
community factors that influences their students’ learning
1.6 Knowledge and understanding of technological and information literacy and how they
affect student learning
2.1 Knowledge of the content they teach, including relationships among central concepts,
tools of inquiry, and structures and current developments within their discipline[s]
2.2 Teachers understand how to connect concepts across disciplines and engage learners
in critical and innovative thinking and collaborative problem solving related to real world
contexts
2.3 Uses a broad range of instructional strategies to make subject matter accessible
2.4 Establishes goals and expectations for all students that are aligned with learning
standards and allow for multiple pathways to achievement
2.5 Designs relevant instruction that connects students’ prior understanding and
experiences to new knowledge
2.6 Evaluate and utilize curricular materials and other appropriate resources to promote
student success in meeting learning goals
3.1 Uses research‐based practices and evidence of student learning to provide
developmentally appropriate and standards‐driven instruction that motivates and
engages students in learning
3.2 Communicate clearly and accurately with students to maximize their understanding
and learning
3.3 Set high expectations and create challenging learning experiences for students
3.4 Explores and uses a variety of instructional approaches, resources, and technologies
to meet diverse learning needs, engage students and promote achievement
3.5 Engage students in the development of multi‐disciplinary skills, such as
communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and use of technology
3.6 Monitors and assesses student progress, seeks and provides feedback, and adapts
instruction to student needs
5.1 Design, adapt, select, and use a range of assessment tools and processes to measure
and document student learning and growth
5.2 Understand, analyze, interpret, and use assessment data to monitor student progress
and to plan and differentiate instruction
5.3 Communicate information about various components of the assessment system
5.4 Reflect upon and evaluate the effectiveness of their comprehensive assessment
system to adjust assessment and plan instruction accordingly
5.5 Prepare students to understand the format and directions of assessment used and the
criteria by which the students will be evaluated
6.1 Upholds professional standards of practice and policy as related to students’ rights
and teachers’ responsibilities
6.2 Engage and collaborate with colleagues and the community to develop and sustain a
common culture that supports high expectations for student learning
6.3 Communicate and collaborate with families, guardians, and caregivers to enhance
student development and success
6.4 Manage and perform non‐instructional duties in accordance with school district
guidelines or other applicable expectations
6.5 Understand and comply with relevant laws and policies as related to students’ rights
and teachers’ responsibilities
7.1 Reflect on their practice to improve instructional effectiveness and guide professional
growth
7.2 Set goals for and engage in ongoing professional development needed to continuously
improve teaching competencies
7.3 Communicate and collaborate with students, colleagues, other professionals, and the
community to improve practice
7.4 Remain current in their knowledge of content and pedagogy by utilizing professional
resources
10
Successful Practices Network
www.nyctecenter.org
RUBRICS
• Rubric for the Rubrics
– Cognitive Engagement
– Constructivist learning
– 21st Century Skills
• NYS Teaching Standards and Elements
11
Successful Practices Network
www.nyctecenter.org
Table Talk
Individually or in groups of two, read one of
the 7 teaching standards (including all
elements). Identify the type “evidence” you
would have to show that you are meeting
this standard.
Share with your table.
Successful Practices Network
www.nyctecenter.org
Levels of Performance
(HEDI)
• Highly Effective - Classroom functions as a
community of learners with student assumption
of responsibility for learning
• Effective - Teaching shows evidence of thorough
knowledge of all aspects of the profession.
Students are engaged in learning. This is
successful, accomplished, professional, and
effective teaching
Successful Practices Network
www.nyctecenter.org
Levels of Performance
(HEDI)
• Developing - Teaching shows evidence of
knowledge and skills related to teaching—but
inconsistent performance
• Ineffective - Teaching shows evidence of not
understanding the concepts underlining the
component-may represent practice that is
harmful-requires intervention
14
Successful Practices Network
www.nyctecenter.org
Composite Score Rating System
The agreement significantly tightens the scoring system to
ensure student achievement and teacher performance are
both properly taken into account for teacher ratings.
Teachers or principals that are rated ineffective in the 40
points could not receive a developing score overall.
•
•
•
•
Ineffective: 0 – 64
Developing: 65 – 74
Effective: 75 – 90
Highly Effective: 91 – 100
Successful Practices Network
www.nyctecenter.org
Summary of APPR Components
Growth
State-provided
Growth/VA
Locally
Selected
Measures
Other
Measures
Scoring
Implementation
Successful Practices Network
Student Learning
Objectives
Assessments and Measures
• Rubrics
• Sources of evidence: observations, visits,
surveys, etc
(20% 25%)
(20%  15%)
(60%)
Subcomponents, Composite Scores, Ratings
Improvement Plans, Appeals, Training
16
www.nyctecenter.org
5 District Decisions (recommended by 5/31/2012)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Assess and identify district priorities and
academic needs.
Identify who will have State-provided growth
measures and who must have SLOs as
“comparable growth measures.”
Determine district rules for how specific
SLOs will get set.
Establish expectations for scoring SLOs and
for determining teacher ratings for the
growth component.
Determine district-wide processes for
setting, reviewing, and assessing SLOs in
schools.
3/01
4/16
5/31
.
Successful Practices Network
17
www.nyctecenter.org
DECISION 1:
ASSESS AND IDENTIFY
DISTRICT PRIORITIES
AND NEEDS
Successful Practices Network
www.engageNY.org
www.nyctecenter.org
Step 1. District Leaders Assess and Identify Priorities and Needs
• What are the District’s overall priorities, needs,
and long-term goals?
• HINT: refer to your district strategic plans, and
ensure alignment to the Common Core.
• HINT: remember that principals and teachers will
be held accountable to goals aligned with the
district’s stated priorities.
• HINT: the more prescriptive district level goals are,
the less variation you will see in (content and rigor
of) school/classroom goals.
Successful Practices Network
19
www.nyctecenter.org
DECISION 2:
WHO NEEDS AN SLO FOR
GROWTH MEASUREMENT?
Successful Practices Network
www.engageNY.org
www.nyctecenter.org
Student Learning Objectives per Ed. Law 3012-C
Student Learning Objectives (SLOs). Per Education Law 3012-c, 40 percent of teacher and principal evaluations must be based on student
achievement. This 40 percent is broken down into two components for
2011-12: 20 percent on student growth on State assessments or comparable measure, and 20 percent on other locally-selected measures. For
teachers where there is no State-provided measure of student growth,
comparable measures must be used. Under the Regulations, this is
referred to as the State-determined growth goal setting process. Student
Learning Objectives (SLOs) are the State-determined process. Training
courses must provide training on a student growth percentile model and
value-added growth model, and for teachers where there is no Stateprovided measure of student growth available, training must be provided
on comparable measures of growth which are Student Learning Objectives
(SLOs). Training courses must also provide training on the application and
use of any State-approved locally selected measures of student achievement: SLOs are a State-approved locally selected measure.
Successful Practices Network
www.nyctecenter.org
What Are Student Learning Objectives (SLOs)?
Represents the most important
learning for the year (or, semester,
where applicable).
Based on available prior student
learning data.
A Student Learning Objective
(SLO) is an academic goal set
for students at the start
of a course.
Specific and measurable.
Successful Practices Network
Aligned to Common Core, State, or
national standards, as well as any
other district and school priorities.
22
www.nyctecenter.org
Required SLOs: Reference Guide
Please see the “Required SLOs:
Reference Guide” for NYSED’s rules for
teachers who have SLOs for State
Growth
Successful Practices Network
23
www.nyctecenter.org
SLO Resources from NYSED
Please visit:
http://engageny.org/resource/
student-learning-objectives/
Successful Practices Network
24
www.nyctecenter.org
SLOs Focus Attention on Essential Learning, Data, and Outcomes
What is the aggregate of what my
students will learn this year?
May/June
March/April
January/February
November/December
September/October
Successful Practices Network
www.nyctecenter.org
State Provided Growth Measure or SLOs?
Teacher
5th Grade Common Branch Teacher
State Provided Growth Measure
or SLO?
State Provided Growth
SGP/VA
8th Grade ELA Teacher
State Provided Growth SGP/VA
Elementary Art Teacher
- Two 2nd grade Art sections with 20 students each;
- Two 4th grade Art sections with 25 students each;
- One 5th grade Art section with 30 students.
SLO:
• 1 SLO for 2nd grade Art
sections
• 1 SLO for 4th grade Art
sections
7th Grade Math and Science Teacher
- Two 7th grade Math sections with 30 students each;
- Two 7th grade Science sections with 25 students each;
- One Advanced 7th grade Science section with 20
students.
SLO:
• 1 SLO for 7th grade math
(will receive State provided
growth SGP)
• 1 SLO for 7th grade Science
High School CTE Teacher
Culinary I (AM): 28 students
Culinary II (PM): 24 student
SLO:
• 1 SLO for Culinary I section
8th Grade Science Teacher
- One 8th grade Science sections with 30 students;
- Four 8th grade Advanced Science section with 28
Successful
Practices
students
each. Network
SLO:
• 1 SLO for 8th grade
Advanced Science sections 26
www.nyctecenter.org
What SLOs will you need?
• Over 50% rule (51+%)
• Take time to determine what SLOs you will
need to prepare for.
Successful Practices Network
www.nyctecenter.org
NYSED SLO Framework
All SLOs MUST include the following basic components:
Student Population
Which students are being addressed?
Learning Content
What is being taught? CCSS/National/State standards? Will this goal
apply to all standards applicable to a course or just to specific priority
standards?
Interval of
Instructional Time
What is the instructional period covered (if not a year, rationale for
semester/quarter/etc)?
Evidence
What assessment(s) or student work product(s) will be used to
measure this goal?
Baseline
What is the starting level of learning for students covered by this SLO?
Target(s)
What is the expected outcome (target) by the end of the instructional
period?
HEDI Criteria
How will evaluators determine what range of student performance
“meets” the goal (effective) versus “well-below” (ineffective) , “below”
(developing), and “well-above” (highly effective)?
Rationale
Why choose this learning content, evidence and target?
Successful Practices Network
28
www.nyctecenter.org
DECISION 3:
HOW WILL SLOs GET SET?
Successful Practices Network
www.engageNY.org
www.nyctecenter.org
NYSED SLO Framework
A student learning objective is an academic goal
for a teacher’s students that is set at the start of a
course.
• It represents the most important learning for the
year (or, semester, where applicable).
• It must be specific and measurable, based on
available prior student learning data, and aligned
to Common Core, State, or national standards, as
well as any other school and district priorities.
• Teachers’ scores are based upon the degree to
which their goals were attained.
•
Source: Page 4 of Guidance on the New York State District-Wide Growth Goal Setting Process:
Student Learning Objectives
Successful Practices Network
30
www.nyctecenter.org
Student Population
These are the students included in the SLO.
• Provide course sections in the SLO
• Includes all students in the selected
course sections
• Provides student names and or ID
numbers for all students in the selected
courses. (Roster)
Successful Practices Network
31
www.nyctecenter.org
Learning Content
This is the content to be taught in the SLO.
Identify the course name and source of standards
(Common Core, national, state, local) associated with
this SLO, and specify the exact standards,
performance indicators, etc., that will be taught,
learned, and assessed.
Successful Practices Network
32
www.nyctecenter.org
Learning Content – Continued
• Course:
• Standards Source:
7th Grade Visual Arts
New York State Learning
Standards
• Standard 1 – Creating, Performing, and Participating in
the Arts
• Standard 3 – Responding to and Analyzing Works of Art.
• Standard 4 – Understanding the Cultural Dimensions
and Contributions of the Arts
• Performance Indicators: 1c, 1d, 3a, 3c, 4c
• Common Core Writing Standards for Literacy in …Technical
Subjects: WHST.6-8.4, WHST.6-8.8
Successful Practices Network
33
www.nyctecenter.org
Learning Content – Continued
(1c) [Students] use the elements and principles of art to
communicate specific meanings to others in their art
work.
(1d) During the creative process [students ] reflect on the
effectiveness of selected mediums or techniques to
convey intended meanings.
(3a) [Students] discuss and write their analyses and
interpretations of their own works of art and the art of
others, using appropriate critical language.
(3c) [Students] compare the ways ideas and concepts are
communicated through visual art with the various
ways that those ideas and concepts are manifested in
other art forms.
Successful Practices Network
34
www.nyctecenter.org
Learning Content – Continued
•
(4c) [Students] create art works that reflect a
particular historical period of a culture.
•
(WHST.6-8.4) [Students] produce clear and coherent
writing in which the development, organization, and
style are appropriate to task, purpose, and
audience.
•
(WHST.6-8.8) [Students] gather relevant information
from multiple print and digital sources, using search
terms effectively; assess the credibility and
accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase
the data and conclusions of others while avoiding
plagiarism and following a standard format for
citation.
Successful Practices Network
35
www.nyctecenter.org
Interval of Instructional Time
This is the timeframe within which the learning content
will be taught. (This is generally one academic year,
unless the course is set as a semester, quarter, etc.)
Specify when the teaching for this learning content will
begin and end. (Rationale is required if less than the typical
year-long interval is set.)
• Indicates a clear start and end date.
• Provides a rationale if the interval is less than one year
(e.g., course length is less than one year).
Successful Practices Network
36
www.nyctecenter.org
Identify Course
In the template provided, identify the course
you will work on, resources for identifying
standards, interval of instructional time. In
the section called “Rationale,” describe your
reason for the choices you made.
Successful Practices Network
www.nyctecenter.org
Evidence
These are the assessments used for determining
students’ levels of learning.
Successful Practices Network
38
www.nyctecenter.org
Evidence
• Identifies pre-assessment(s) and summative
assessment(s).
• Selects summative assessments from either the
State-approved list or those developed and
approved by the district/BOCES, and
supported by superintendent’s certification of
rigor and comparability.
• Offers accommodations as legally required
and appropriate.
• Ensures that those with vested interest are not
scoring summative assessments.
Successful Practices Network
39
www.nyctecenter.org
Evidence – (Summative Rubric)
Note on Rubric: Each student’s work will be scored by two other district middle school visual arts
teachers using the following rubric, with both teachers’ scores being averaged to yield the final student
scores.
2 points
1 point
(0 points for no attempt)
3 or more elements
2 elements used that
used that strongly reflect strongly reflect stated
stated viewpoint
viewpoint
1 element was used that
strongly reflects stated
viewpoint
Attempt(s) made, but no
elements were used that
strongly reflect stated
viewpoint
3 or more principles
2 principles used that
used that strongly reflect strongly reflect stated
stated viewpoint
viewpoint
1 principle used that
strongly reflects stated
viewpoint
Attempt(s) made, but no
principles were used
that strongly reflect stated
viewpoint
Student does both of the
following for three
sources:
 describes generally
why sources are
credible and accurate
 cites sources generally
and/or clearly following
appropriate conventions
Attempt(s) made, but one
or neither of the following
takes place:
 describes generally
why sources are
credible and accurate
 cites sources generally
and/or clearly following
appropriate conventions
4 points
Creative Task
(1c) Use of
elements
(row score x
3)
Creative Task
(1c) Use of
principles
(row score x
3)
Student does both of the
Task 2
following for three
(WHST.6-8.8) sources:
Gather
 describes
relevant
convincingly why
source
sources are credible
information
and accurate
(row score x  cites sources clearly
1)
following appropriate
conventions
Successful Practices Network
3 points
Student does both of the
following for three
sources:
 describes convincingly
why sources are
credible and accurate
 cites sources generally
following appropriate
conventions
40
www.nyctecenter.org
Evidence
• Spend some time discussing what
evidence or assessments you may have
available for this SLO. What will you
need?
Successful Practices Network
www.nyctecenter.org
Baseline
This is the level of students’ knowledge and skill in the
targeted learning content at the beginning of the
interval of instructional time.
• Describe how students performed on the identified preassessment(s) for the learning content, including any
additional data that informed SLO development.
• Actual baseline scores for each student are required.
Successful Practices Network
42
www.nyctecenter.org
Target(s)
This is the numeric achievement goal which
articulates the amount that students will have to
grow during the interval of instructional time.
Define numeric growth goals for student
performance on identified summative
assessment(s) which measure student knowledge
and skill in the learning content. (Actual final
scores for each student are required.)
Successful Practices Network
43
www.nyctecenter.org
Target(s)
• Provides a target statement.
• Provides a specific growth goal for each student.
• Sets targets consistent with district-level
expectations for target-setting in this
grade/subject.
Successful Practices Network
44
www.nyctecenter.org
Student Population, Baseline, and Target(s)
SLO Target Approach 1: Set a common growth target.
• 90% of students, including special populations, will
grow by 60 percentage points or more on their
summative assessment compared to their pre-test for
the standards. (e.g., Student E’s target is 60 more than
30, or 90.)
Student
Pre-Test Score Summative Target
Student A
10
70
Student B
20
80
Student C
5
65
Student D
0
60
Student E
30
90
Student F
10
70
Successful Practices Network
45
www.nyctecenter.org
Student Population, Baseline, and Target(s)
SLO Target Approach 2: Set a growth to mastery
target.
• 85% of students, including special populations,
will grow to score 75% or higher on the
summative assessment for the selected standards.
Student
Student A
Pre-Test Score
10
Summative Target
75
Student B
Student C
Student D
20
5
0
75
75
75
Student E
Student F
30
10
75
75
Successful Practices Network
46
www.nyctecenter.org
Student Population, Baseline, and Target(s)
SLO Target Approach 3: Set differentiated growth
targets by student.
• 85% of students, including special populations, will
meet or exceed their individualized target.
Student
Student A
Student B
Pre-Test Score
10
20
Summative Target
80
80
Student C
Student D
Student E
5
0
30
75
70
85
Student F
10
80
Successful Practices Network
47
www.nyctecenter.org
HEDI for SLOs in State Growth
What are “district goals” if there is no state test
for the grade/subject?
Standards for Rating
Categories
Highly
Effective
Growth or Comparable Measures
Results are well-above state average for similar
students (or District goals if no state test).
Effective
Results meet state average for similar students (or
District goals if no state test).
Developing
Results are below state average for similar
students (or District goals if no state test).
Ineffective
Results are well-below state average for similar
students (or District goals if no state test).
Successful Practices Network
48
www.nyctecenter.org
HEDI
• Categorizes all possible scoring results in the HEDI
structure such that
– Highly effective = exceeds district expectations
– Effective = meets district expectations
– Developing = is below district expectations
– Ineffective = is well below district expectations
• Is mathematically possible for the teacher to obtain
every point value within a rating category.
• Allocates points clearly and objectively within a
HEDI rating category.
Successful Practices Network
49
Review
www.nyctecenter.org
Training SLO Target Approach 1: Set a common growth
target.
90% of students will grow by 60 percentage points or more
on their post-test compared to their pre-test for the
standards. (e.g., Student E’s target is 60 more than 30, or
90.)
Student
Student A
Student B
Pre-Test Score
10
20
Summative Target
70
80
Student C
Student D
Student E
5
0
30
65
60
90
Student F
10
70
Successful Practices Network
50
www.nyctecenter.org
Training SLO HEDI Approach 1: Set ratings using the
percent of students meeting individual targets.
90% of students will grow by 60 percentage points or more on
their summative assessment compared to their pre-test for the
standards.
Highly Effective*
(18-20 points)
Effective*
(9-17 points)
Developing*
(3-8 points)
Ineffective*
(0-2 points)
95-100% of students
grew by 60 points or
more on the
standards addressed
86-94% of students
grew by 60 points or
more on the
standards addressed
80-85% of students
grew by 60 points or
more on the
standards addressed
79% or less of
students grew by 60
points or more on the
standards addressed
85=8 points
84=7 points
83=6 points
82=5 points
80=4 points
80=3 points
70-79=2 points
60-69=1 point
0-59=0 points
98-100=20 points
96-97=19 points
95=18 points
94=17 points
93=16 points
92=15 points
91=14 points
90=13 points
89=12 points
88=11 points
87=10 points
86=9 points
Successful Practices Network
51
Review
www.nyctecenter.org
Training SLO Target Approach 2: Set a growth to
mastery target.
85% of students, including special populations, will grow
to score 75% or higher on the summative assessment for
the selected standards.
Student
Student A
Student B
Pre-Test Score
10
20
Summative Target
75
75
Student C
Student D
Student E
5
0
30
75
75
75
Student F
10
75
Successful Practices Network
52
www.nyctecenter.org
Training SLO HEDI Approach 2: Set ratings using the
percent of students meeting a collective target (e.g.,
80% mastery).
85% of students, including special populations, will grow
to score 75% or higher on the summative assessment for
the selected standards.
Highly Effective*
(18-20 points)
91-100% of students
demonstrate mastery of
75% of the selected
visual arts standards
using the postassessment rubric
98-100=20 points
95-97=19 points
91-94=18 points
Effective*
(9-17 points)
Developing*
(3-8 points)
Ineffective*
(0-2 points)
85% -90% of students
demonstrate mastery of
75% of the selected visual
arts standards using the
post-assessment rubric
90=17 points
89=16 points
88=14-15 points
87=12-13 points
86=10-11 points
85=9 points
79% - 84% of students
demonstrate mastery of
75% of the selected visual
arts standards using the
post-assessment rubric
84=8 points
83=7 points
82=6 points
81=5 points
80=4 points
79=3 points
78% or less of
students demonstrate
mastery of 75% of the
selected visual arts
standards using the
post-assessment
rubric
Successful Practices Network
70-78=2 points
60-69=1 point
0-59=0 points
53
www.nyctecenter.org
Rationale
This describes the reasoning behind the choices
regarding learning content, evidence, and target.
Describe the selection of the elements (learning
content, evidence, and target) and how they will be
used together to prepare students for future growth
and development, as well as college and career
readiness.
Successful Practices Network
54
www.nyctecenter.org
Rationale
• Provides reasoning for the selection of the
learning content, evidence, and target.
• Describes how the elements will be used
together to prepare students for future
coursework, as well as college and career
readiness.
Successful Practices Network
55
www.nyctecenter.org
Who Decides What For Comparable Growth Measures?
State
STUDENT LEARNING
OBJECTIVE
12
Successful Practices Network
56
www.nyctecenter.org
What Do Schools Determine (Principals, Teachers)
Implement SLOs in the context of State and District requirements:
Principals
make
choices
where they
have
flexibility
Lead
evaluator
implements
SLOs with
teachers
Successful Practices Network
Lead
evaluator
approves
SLOs
Teacher
delivers
instruction
mapped
towards
goals
Schools
ensure
security and
integrity of
assessments
Lead
evaluator
monitors/
assesses
results
57
www.nyctecenter.org
SLOs: A Critical Component of the College and Career Readiness System
Note: this represents an example system
SLO PROCESS
September – October
January
May – June
• School reviews district
academic priorities and district
guidelines
• Discuss progress to date on
SLOs including results from
observation and DDI cycles
•Teacher gathers baseline data
• Principal provides teacher
with specific feedback and
strategies
• Teacher proposes SLOs;
principal approves SLO
• Students take summative
assessments for their courses
• Evaluator and teacher discuss
results of multiple measures
• Principal provides teacher
with final score for their SLOs
1) Evaluator collects objective evidence
2) Evaluator gives evidence-based feedback
3) Reflective teacher adjusts instruction to better target specific
student learning needs and increase achievement
DDI CYCLES
5-6 cycles/year
OBSERVATION
CYCLES
Common Core Instruction
Successful Practices Network
Assessments
Data Driven
Culture
Action
Analysis
20
www.nyctecenter.org
Assessment Options for SLOs: Reference Guide
Please see the “Assessment Options for
SLOs: Reference Guide” for NYSED’s
rules for assessment options for
teachers who have SLOs for State
Growth
Successful Practices Network
59
www.nyctecenter.org
Thank You!
And remember to visit
www.nyctecenter.org
and
www.engageny.org
60
Successful Practices Network

similar documents