SLO Writers Workshop - HudsonSLO

Report
Teamwork in Motion
Supporting the Development of Student Learning Objectives
http://hudsonslo.wikispaces.com/home
Learning Targets
Describe the value of Student Learning
Objectives. (School Learning Objective)
Understand the SLO process from multiple perspectives.
Plan a support system for developing
quality SLOs to transform student and
adult learning.
Todays Meet
http://todaysmeet.com/WASCDSLO
Agenda
4-5:15- SLO Conversation
5:15-5:30- Break
5:30-6- Panel Discussion to Answer Questions
6-6:30- Roundtable Discussions
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Teacher Perspective- Deb & Amanda
Specialist Perspective- Amy & Jodi
Administration’s Support- Susie
Launching SLO in the High School - Peg
Wiki exploration- Independently
Connect the Dots
Student
Learning
Objectives
Multiple
Measures
SMART
Goals
Improved
Student
Learning
Common
Assessments
Common
Core State
Standards
Focus For
Collaboration
Things Effective Teachers Do
Table
Talk
http://youtu.be/g1Cw34t5pv8
Things Effective Teachers Do
Table
Talk
• Assess students to determine their
instructional levels and clarify their academic
needs.
• Set instructional goals for students.
• Design strategies and identify resources to
address identified needs.
• Monitor and assess student progress
throughout the school year and adjust
instruction accordingly.
• Work cooperatively with colleagues to share
professional expertise.
How is this like a SLO?
The SLO Process systemizes what
effective teachers do.
SLO Speak
Purposes of SLO’s
1. Focus on student results
2. Connect goal setting processes to the
SLO Process
3. Explicitly connect teaching and
learning
4. Improve instructional practices and
teacher performance
5. Serve as a tool for school improvement
Who can support the SLO Process?
Principal
Learning Services
Leadership Team/ SMART Goal Team
Colleagues during collaboration time
Instructional Coaches
Peer Coach
Superintendent
Types of SLO Attainable or Growth Goals
Tiered
Whole Group
Sub Group
Individual
Program (Educational Specialists)
Number of Students
Tiered SLO- Baseline Data U.S. History Assessment
Achievement Levels
• Primary sources comparative analysis
• District-developed rubric for high school students
Tiered SLO
During the course of this school year, all students will make measurable
progress in U.S. History as measured by the district-developed primary
sources comparative analysis rubric for high school. Students will
improve their scores as follows:
Students scoring at the Novice and Developing levels on the preassessment will improve to the Proficient level on the postassessment.
Students scoring at the Proficient level on the pre-assessment will
improve to the Exceeding level on the post-assessment.
Students scoring on the Exceeding level on the pre-assessment will
have their pre-assessments re-scored using the College and
Professional level rubric, and will improve their scores by one
level on the post-assessment.
Tiered Example of Goals
Student
Student 1
Student 2
Student 3
Student 4
Student 5
Student 6
Student 7
Student 8
Student 9
Student 10
Student 11
Student 12
Student 13
Student 14
Student 15
Student 16
Student 17
Student 18
Student 19
Student 20
Baseline score
Needed Final Score
Novice
Novice
Novice
Novice
Novice
Novice
Developing
Developing
Developing
Developing
Proficient
Proficient
Proficient
Proficient
Proficient
Proficient
Proficient
Proficient
Proficient
Proficient
Proficient
Proficient
Proficient
Proficient
Proficient
Exceeding
Exceeding
Exceeding
Exceeding
Exceeding
Exceeding/College: Novice
Exceeding/College: Developing
Exceeding/College: Developing
Exceeding/College: Developing
Exceeding/College: Proficient
College: Developing
College: Proficient
College: Proficient
College: Proficient
College: Exceeding
Support and Strategies
1. Understand the expectations for
disciplinary literacy in the CCSS and create
instruction matched to these goals.
2. Classroom supports with notes and
flipped lessons online.
3. Create student friendly rubric to use with
students.
Whole Group SLOs
Data suggest that students come with relatively
similar readiness levels for the content being
taught.
For outliers (exceptionally low or exceptionally
high performing students), individual SLOs may
need to be developed.
May be more likely in a course in which
prerequisite scores or courses are necessary
Whole Group SLO Baseline Data
Strengths:
Conventions
Descriptive language
Area of need:
28% met grade level
proficiency on developing
a character.
23% met grade level
expectations on
developing a conclusion.
Whole Group- 5th Grade Writing
By June 2013, 80% of all 5th graders in my class
will independently demonstrate their grade level
proficiency on the district rubric for narrative
writing of:
1. Orienting the reader by establishing a
situation and introducing a narrator and or
characters.
2. Providing a conclusion that follows from a
narrated experience or events.
Strategies and Support
1. Understand the expectations for narrative
writing in the CCSS and create instruction
matched to these goals.
2. Determine exemplar papers in the 2 criteria
and use for instruction.
3. Create authentic opportunities for students
to write throughout the day.
4. Use mentor texts to model good writing craft.
5. Create a student friendly rubric for students
to self reflect and set goals.
End of the Year Data
Sub Group SLO- Reading F & P
Baseline data shows 6/23
(red) 2nd grade students
began the year below the
monthly target for the
Fountas and Pinnell
Reading Assessment.
These 6 students are my
sub group.
Subgroup Reading Goals
By June 2013, the six
students below grade level
will increase 5 levels by the
end of the year.
Strategies and Support
• Guided Reading 3-4 times a week for these
students
• Goal setting with students
• Comprehension strategies taught the same
with school and home
• Target interventions based on need to be
utilized during our intervention block
• Progress monitor growth
• Fluency program- Read Naturally
Individualized SLOs
Used for smaller groups of students
with a variety of readiness levels and
background knowledge.
Acceptable amounts of progress are
often dependent on students’
historical academic performances.
When working with special populations,
individual SLO’s may be appropriate.
Individual SLO
During 2012-13, each student will make a growth of 65
points based on the common assessment
Student
Student 1
Student 2
Student 3
Student 4
Student 5
Student 6
Student 7
Student 8
Student 9
Student 10
Student 11
Student 12
Student 13
Student 14
Student 15
Student 16
Baseline score
Growth Objective
0
0
0
0
2
4
4
6
10
10
12
12
14
14
18
20
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
Needed Final
Score
65
65
65
65
67
69
69
71
75
75
77
77
79
79
83
85
Strategies and Support
1. Goal setting.
2. Small group instruction.
3. Personalized work.
Program SLO- PBIS Baseline Data
2010-11– 119 bottom lines= .67/day
2011-12- 101 bottom lines= .56/ day
2012-13— 115 bottom lines= .64/ day
Program SLO
During the 2013-14 school year, our
students’ bottom line behaviors K-5
at Hudson Prairie School will reduce
from .64 to an average of .5 referrals
per day which will keep students in
classrooms and improve student
learning.
Strategies and Support
• Begin tracking minor behaviors
• Begin Check In Check Out system
• Have a PBIS refresher in Feb. since our
referrals were highest in March
• Increase supervision on the playground to 1
adult for 50 students since the playground is
the area where most bottom lines occur
• Coaching of noon duty staff
Deb’s SLO Process
What is specific area that my students
need improvement?
Reflect
What is an attainable yet rigorous goal
based on the baseline assessment?
Should it be differentiated based on
results?
Does it address all components in the
rubric?
Act
Baseline assessment
Write SLO
Choose
What is my SLO focus?
What is an appropriate
assessment to measure the goal?
Share Criteria and Guiding Questions
Staff Meetings and structured collaboration with
Principal, Peer Coaches, Instructional Coaches
Data Review and Gaining Focus
Reading
Writing
Math
Content
Learning Focus
Develop an assessment to match need
Assessment Checklist
1. Does it follow the keys to quality assessment?
• Purpose
• Targets
• Design
• Communication
• Student Involvement
2. Can it be used throughout the year to measure growth?
3. Does it align with the SLO?
4. Is it reliable and valid?
Give Baseline On Demand Writing
Baseline Data Analysis
3/22= 13% meeting
grade level
proficiency on
writing rubric.
Focus and Type of SLO
What’s my focus? Narrative Writing
What type of SLO is appropriate?
•
•
•
•
•
Tiered
Whole Group
Sub Group
Individual
Program
What is a rigorous yet attainable growth goal?
80% School goal
RtI tier 1 suggests 80-85%
SMART Template- Whole Group
By June of 2013 , 80% of the students in
Mrs. Brastad’s 2nd grade class will
independently demonstrate their grade
level proficiency on the district’s rubric for
narrative writing.





Specific
Measurable
Attainable
Results Oriented
Time bound
SMART Template- Tiered SLO
By June of 2013, 100% of the students in Mrs. Brastad’s
2nd grade class will increase the number of criteria as
proficient according to the district’s rubric for narrative
writing.
O increasing to 2 of 4 criteria
1 increasing to 3 of 4 criteria
2 increasing to 3 of 4 criteria
3 increasing to 4 of 4 criteria
4 increasing to exceeding category in 1 or more criteria





Specific
Measurable
Attainable
Results Oriented
Time bound
Strategies and Support
1.
2.
3.
4.
Utilize mentor texts
Utilize the gradual release process
Small group writing
Collaborative scoring of student
writing and choosing exemplars to
share with students
5. Lab classroom observations
6. Support from instructional coach
Fill in SLO Form
Reflect on the SLO with the criteria
Practice at
your table
Reflect
Act
Approval
Does it address all components in the
rubric?
Does it follow the SMART Goal criteria of
being specific, measurable, attainable,
rigorous, and time bound?
Does the assessment match the goal?
Is it rigorous?
Choose
How can I improve my actions?
Step 2- Submit SLO for Approval
SLO given to principal prior to the meeting for pre-planning
support.
At the meeting, we address questions and highlight criteria
collaboratively and identify additional supports.
Ongoing Support of SLO
 Lab classroom
 Feedback from instructional coach and principal
 Collaborative scoring for consistency
 Build in time for conversations about teaching and
learning at collaboration meetings
 Professional learning specific to initiatives
 Individual data talks
Reflect
Act
Continue actions and data
collection
Approval
What is the progress students are
making toward the goal? Individual and
group
Does the goal need revisions to make it
attainable yet rigorous?
How are the actions making an impact
on student learning?
What additional support or actions do
you need?
Choose
Updated goal
How canactions
I improve my actions?
Updated
Step 3- Mid Year Review
Opportunity to adjust
goal based on data.
Mid Year Conference
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BpjY1po3yTg
Reflect
Act
New SLO
Did you
What
is the
metprogress
your goal?
students are
making
Are
there
toward
any circumstances
the goal? Individual
to consider?
and
group actions had the greatest impact?
What
Does the
What
are goal
yourneed
next revisions
steps? to make it
attainable
How
do you
yet
score
rigorous?
on DPI rubric?
Choose
Area to focus on for improvement
and a possible SLO for the
following year.
Step 4 Goal Approval
Goal Approval Conference
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=76uAJcKZPIg
Still grappling with….
How can we allocate more TIME for this process?
How do we provide differentiated support for our
teachers and administrators?
How do we support specialized teachers in writing SLO’s?
How can we collect and use data effectively?
How can we provide teachers with models of a high
quality SLO?
Kid President
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgQLqv9f4o&safe=active
Reflect on Learning Targets
Describe the value of Student Learning
Objectives.
Understand the SLO process from multiple perspectives.
Plan a support system for developing
quality SLOs to transform student and
adult learning
Panel Discussion- Questions?
Hudson Prairie Team
Susie Prather, Principal
[email protected]
Deb Brastad, 2nd Grade
[email protected]
Amanda McCarthy, 5th Grade
[email protected]
Jodi Magee, Media Specialist
[email protected]
Amy Gallick, Music Specialist
[email protected]
Differentiated Roundtables
1.
2.
3.
4.
Teacher Perspective- Deb & Amanda
Specialist Perspective- Amy & Jodi
Administration’s Support- Susie
Launching SLO in the High School Peg
5. Wiki exploration- Independently

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