HBS - Center for Digital Education

Report
Leveraging the New LMS Opportunity at HBS:
A Case in Collaborating on Course Design
Harvard University IT Summit – June 23, 2011
Meghan Dolan, Baker Library Services, Knowledge and Library Services
Carla Tishler, Educational Technology Group, Information Technology Group
Debra Wallace, Baker Library Services, Knowledge and Library Services
Copyright © President & Fellows of Harvard College
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HBS – Steady State
• Celebrated Centennial in 2008
• 1800 MBA Students
 900 MBA students in Required Curriculum (RC)
 900 MBA students in Elective Curriculum (EC)
• 130 Doctoral students
• > 225 Faculty
• Case method – primary pedagogical approach
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HBS – Inflection Point/Emergent Priorities
New Dean – July 1, 2010 – Identified 5 Priorities Jan. 2011
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Innovation in our educational programs
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Recommitment to our Intellectual ambition
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Internationalization
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Inclusion
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Integration
Among many opportunities to “usher in a new era of innovation”:
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New faculty group to lead MBA program innovations
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New facilities to enable new pedagogies
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New learning management system (LMS) as foundation for learning
environment
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Horizon Report 2011 - Challenges
The abundance of resources and relationships made easily accessible
via the Internet is increasingly challenging us to revisit our roles as
educators in sense-making, coaching, and credentialing.
People expect to be able to work, learn, and study whenever and
wherever they want.
The world of work is increasingly collaborative, giving rise to reflection
about the way student projects are structured.
The Horizon Report 2011– pg. 3
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Trends: Horizon Report 2011
Digital media literacy continues its rise in importance as a key skill in
every discipline and profession.
Keeping pace with the rapid proliferation of information, software tools,
and devices is challenging for students and teachers alike.
The Horizon Report – pg. 4
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Opportunities: Build Models
Straight transfer:
• Conversion of content directly from former course platform to new
LMS
Enhanced learning environment in existing or revised course:
• Test and develop new tools to work in collaboration with LMS
features
• Incorporate resources outside of LMS to enhance content
• Increase value by providing access to course content, social media
tools and library resources
Create a new course:
• Starting from scratch
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Course Development Collaboration Model
Shared Purpose:
Increased Student
Performance &
Faculty
Effectiveness
Education
Technologists
Faculty
Librarians
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Approach
• KLS – ETG Discussions (July 2010)
• Faculty Work from faculty curriculum design
(Feb. 2011)
• Identify learning objectives/course structure
• Develop content / activities to support learning
objectives
• Identify innovative tools to enhance student
learning
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HBS EC Course: Case Illustration
Precursors to Success:
• Both groups had partnered with faculty member, Professor Chris
Marquis.
• Faculty engagement. Willingness to pilot/experiment - comfort and
trust level
• Course Revision – change in course focus; new EC structure; case
& field components
• Course Content – lends itself to creativity and use of social media
tools
• Mix of pedagogical approaches made sense to achieve learning
objectives
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HBS Learning Hub
• Since 1995: HBS Course Platform—a proprietary toolset
• Desire2Learn (D2L) was selected in 2010
• Foundation that provides flexibility needed to support curricular
innovation
• Rebranded – HBS Learning Hub
• August launch date
• Connection to new Student Information System in 2012
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WordPress Blog
Learning Challenge: Stay connected across the course modules,
invite outside participants to join the conversation
Expected benefit: Cohesion and consistency
Measure of success: Ongoing use, connection to assignments, traffic,
student and faculty enthusiasm
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WordPress
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Voice Thread
Learning Challenge: Bring field-based learning back to classmates in
a way that invites feedback and collaboration
Expected benefit: Student engagement and energy
Measure of success: Final projects that show collaboration and active
participation in learning
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VoiceThread
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Mind Manager
Learning Challenge: Map course concepts as they emerge and are
defined through the course; students will help shape the nature and
definition of social entrepreneurship
Expected benefit: Student participation in building knowledge;
constructive learning
Measure of success: Completed mind map that captures course
breadth
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Mind Manager….
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Mind Manager….
Examples of course concepts and teaching points:
Social Entrepreneurship
Social Value
Reshaping Policy / Industry / Market
Organizational Structure (conventional vs hybrid model)
Leadership
Organizational Culture
Impact Investing
Collaboration / Partnerships
Scaling the Mission Growth / Exit Strategies
Understand the challenges
Understand social entrepreneurship / social value
Analyze how to grow business value
Identify social entrepreneurship strategies
Identify the synergies
Analyze the mission and culture of organizations that are “doing well by doing good”
Understand the complexities of impact investment
Analyze partnerships
Examine supply chain, customer relationships, and stakeholder roles
Formulate solutions
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Course Wiki (used in past course)
Learning Challenge: Identify and manage resources to support
student learning; provide access to material in an easy to build, use and
maintain platform
Expected benefit: Enhance student access to research material;
provide students with a course specific starting point for their research;
add value to library collection by creating a portal that highlights both
subscription and free sources
Measure of success: Usage statistics; materials informed/added value
to student output/deliverables
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Course Wiki
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Milestones
January 2011—connect with faculty
Spring 2011—planning and tool research
Summer 2011—training on D2L and on third-party
tools, check-ins with faculty, guidelines
August 2011—launch pilot for fall EC term
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• Extend to Doctoral seminars
• Explore further EC course support opportunities
• Test additional social media and collaborative
knowledge construction approaches
• Pilot new information products using Baker
Library Collections
• Broaden our knowledge of learning outcomes
• Deep vs. surface learning
• Knowledge construction & consumption beyond formal
classroom/programs
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Evaluation Components
• Meeting learning objectives and faculty’s
expectations
• Evaluating the tools used in the course
• Faculty and student engagement
• Extending ETG and KLS capabilities
• Leveraging Baker Library Collections
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Key Considerations
• Computing in “the cloud” – faculty guidelines
• FERPA ramifications
• Comfort level with technology and change
• Documentation on how to use the tools to
achieve learning objectives
• Security analysis as needed
• Scalable support and engagement model
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References and Contact Information
• Johnson, L., Smith, R., Willis, H., Levine, A., and Haywood, K.,
(2011). The 2011 Horizon Report. Austin, Texas: The New Media
Consortium. Available at:
http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/HR2011.pdf
• Spotlight on Collaboration – Harvard Business Review. July-August
2011, pg. 67-110.
Meghan Dolan – [email protected]
Carla Tishler – [email protected]
Deb Wallace – [email protected]
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