CTE is Your STEM Strategy for STEM Recognition

Report
CTE is Your STEM Strategy
for
STEM Recognition
Career and Technical Education
2014 Summer Conference
NC STEM Recognition
NC DPI Acknowledges
NC STEM Learning Network in collaboration with
The NC Science, Mathematics and Technology Education Center
and
The Friday Institute at North Carolina State University for their collaboration and the
development of this rubric. Recommended citation for this rubric: Friday Institute for Educational
Innovation (2013). Middle School STEM Implementation Rubric. Raleigh, NC: Author
www.ncpublicschools.org/stem
CTE? STEM?
• …emphasize a need for business and educators to join efforts
to ensure students are appropriately prepared for emerging
workplaces in our communities
• …leaders agree support and goals are needed to ensure a
workforce is prepared for the high-skill, high-wage, and highdemand jobs of a knowledge-based and innovative economy
• …prepare human resources to add the value that customers
around the world desire
• …a vision that leverages public and private resources in the
most effective manner possible, moving North Carolina further
and faster toward a world-class workforce and sustained
economic growth and development in a global market
…visions propelling similar goals and outcomes
Co-equally Connected
STEM and CTE strategies provide robust
educational opportunities to prepare our
future workforce, leaders, and next
generation of innovators.
…globally competitive workforce K-12 and beyond
STEM Priority
•
•
•
•
•
Developed the NC STEM Strategic Plan
Defined STEM Education
Outlined 11essential Attributes
Created a STEM Implementation Rubric
Implemented Anchor and Affinity Network
Themed Schools
• Developed NC STEM Recognition
Program
NC STEM Education
Identified and Defined Three Principles
– Integrated STEM Curriculum aligned to Industry
Standards
– On-going Community and Industry Engagement
– Connections with Postsecondary Education
www.ncpublicschools.org/stem
STEM
 Organized around the Engineering Design Process/Engineering
Connections
 Anchors to content in the areas of science, technology, and
mathematics
 complements courses in the Arts, Career and Technical
Education, English Language Arts, Healthful Living, Music,
Social Studies, and World Languages
STEM… L & L is applied in an integrated manner, interwoven
throughout and advance all content areas with assessment
and exhibition of STEM skills
Quality STEM Education
21st Century Skills
Language
Arts
Responsibility
Problem
solving
Music
World
Languages
Professionalism
Healthful
Living
E
Technology use
Entrepreneurial
spirit
T
CTE
Collaboration/
teamwork
Social
Studies
S
M
Adaptability
Ethics
Critical
thinking
Art
Oral/written
communications
Creativity
Attributes: Vision of STEM School
Integrated Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) curriculum, aligned with state, national, international and industry standards
1) Project-based learning with integrated content across STEM subjects
2) Connections to effective in-and out-of-school STEM programs
3) Integration of technology and virtual learning
4) Authentic assessment and exhibition of STEM skills
5) Professional development on integrated STEM curriculum, community/industry partnerships and postsecondary education connections
6) Outreach, support and focus on underserved, especially females, minorities, and economically disadvantaged
On-going community and industry engagement
7) A communicated STEM plan is adopted across education, communities and businesses
8) STEM work-based learning experiences, to increase interest and abilities in fields requiring STEM skills, for each student and teacher
9) Business and community partnerships for mentorship, internship and other STEM opportunities that extend the classroom walls
Connections with postsecondary education
10) Alignment of student’s career pathway with post-secondary STEM program(s)
11) Credit completion at community colleges, colleges and/or universities *
Attributes define essential components central to STEM & 21st Century Skills
* Not required for Elementary or Middle Schools - For High Schools Only
KEY
ELEMENT
(1) Curriculum: Project-based learning (PBL) with integrated content across STEM subjects
Early
Model
Prepared
Developing
1
1.2
Frequency of
STEM
Integration
Project-based learning is used
Project-based learning is regularly
monthly throughout all subject areas,
used throughout all subject areas,
which includes all STEM content areas which includes all STEM content areas
as well as additional subjects
as well as additional subjects
Up to 25% of STEM core and elective
teachers regularly make explicit efforts
to integrate science, technology,
engineering and math, requiring
students to organize knowledge across
disciplines
25-50% of STEM core and elective
teachers regularly make explicit
efforts to integrate science,
technology, engineering and math,
requiring students to organize
knowledge across disciplines
50-75% of STEM core and elective
teachers regularly make explicit
efforts to integrate science,
technology, engineering and math,
requiring students to organize
knowledge across disciplines
Over 75% of STEM core and elective
teachers regularly make explicit
efforts to integrate science,
technology, engineering and math,
requiring students to organize
knowledge across disciplines
1.3
Collaborati
ve PLCs
1
Project-based learning is used
monthly in all STEM content areas
Semiannually, STEM teachers share
STEM activities or ideas and plan
learning outcomes through
professional learning community
meetings and common planning time
Quarterly, STEM teachers share
STEM activities or ideas and plan
learning outcomes through
professional learning community
meetings and common planning time
Monthly, STEM teachers share STEM
activities or ideas and plan learning
outcomes through professional
learning community meetings and
common planning time
Weekly, STEM teachers share or cocreate STEM activities or ideas and
plan learning outcomes through
professional learning community
meetings and common planning time
1.4
Physical
Space
1.1
Frequen
cy of
PBL
1
1
Project-based learning is used rarely
in all STEM content areas
On special occasions computer labs or
classrooms are transformed into
collaborative spaces and project work
areas for face-to-face and/or virtual
collaboration among students and
teachers, or to be used as exhibition
spaces
Occasionally computer labs or
classrooms are transformed into
collaborative spaces and project work
areas for face-to-face and/or virtual
collaboration among students and
teachers, or to be used as exhibition
spaces
Frequently computer labs or
classrooms are transformed into
collaborative spaces and project work
areas for face-to-face and/or virtual
collaboration among students and
teachers, or to be used as exhibition
spaces; may include a STEM lab
One or more facilities or spaces are
available specifically for students to
collaborate and do project work; the
spaces can be used for face-to-face
and/or virtual collaboration among
students and teachers; they can also
be used as exhibition spaces; may
include a STEM lab
1
Project-based learning (PBL) activities have students working in small, collaborative groups; the groups go through a process of inquiry and eventually produce high-quality products/presentations; projects can mirror the real
work of professionals and move beyond classroom in purpose or audience
http://www.ncpublicschools.org/docs/stem/schools/rubrics/high-school.pdf
STEM Attribute Implementation Rubric – High School
STEM Courses
•
Aerospace, Security,
Advanced Manufacturing
•
•
•
•
•
•
Biomedical Systems I
Biomedical Systems II
Biomaterials, Statics, &
Strengths of Materials
Neuroscience
Agri-science and
Biotechnology
•
•
•
•
Fundamentals of Flight
Material Science and Electrical
Applications
Automation
Security
Health and Life Sciences
•
•
•
•
•
Agricultural Ecology
Agricultural Genetics
Agricultural Biotechnology
Agricultural Solutions
Energy and Sustainability
•
•
•
•
Foundations
Planetary Boundaries
Human Impacts
Paths to Global Solutions
Aligns & complements CTE Career Clusters and our economic drivers
What is STEM Education
 strategy to build a world-class workforce that leads to graduation,
postsecondary education, and careers in our global economy
 integrates S, T, E, M enabling students to understand complex
societal problems through project and problem based leading &
learning to prepare our next generation of innovators
 aligns with the SCoS and is a critical complement to courses in the
Arts, Career and Technical Education, English Language,
Healthful Living, Music, Social Studies, and World Languages, and
Out-of-School programs
 sustainability through leadership developing & delivering effective
quality instructional materials through relevant connections
Why STEM? Why CTE?
• Strategic Plan: as an economic imperative
to:
•
•
•
•
Transform education
Build world class workforce
Align with emerging industries
Ensure NC economic prosperity
prepare our next generation of innovators
ensure our citizens are learning the skills that will
keep their communities globally competitive.
Common Threads
STEM and CTE
CTE is Your STEM Strategy
Kate Blosveren, Associate Executive Director, NASDCTEc
states in CTE is Your STEM Strategy, December 2013
 CTE programs provide:
 a strong foundation, is an effective tool, and serve as a
delivery system of implementing STEM competencies and
skills for a broader range of students,
 Stakeholders--inherent connection and overlap in goals and
content of STEM and CTE
CTE is Your STEM Strategy
 CTE may not address everything within a STEM strategy,
but policymakers, educators shouldn’t be reinventing the
wheel
 Areas where CTE and STEM programs can learn from
and strengthen one another
 STEM is naturally embedded across the 16 Career
Clusters®
Ramp Up
Commitment to integrate engineering
design principles K-12
Interest and prepare our workforce by
providing real-world lessons that
 Enables the development of a set of
thinking, reasoning, collaborative teamwork,
and skills students can use in all areas of
their lives
Connecting the Dots
Recognizing Exemplar STEM
Leadership and Learning
11 Essential
CTE and STEM
Integrated Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
curriculum, aligned with state, national, international and industry standards
1) Project-based learning with integrated content across STEM subjects
 Problem-based/project-based
learning
2) Connections to effective in-and out-of-school STEM programs
3) Integration of technology and virtual learning
4) Authentic assessment and exhibition of STEM skills
 Integrate/Cross-disciplinary
5) Professional development on integrated STEM curriculum,
community/industry partnerships and postsecondary education connections
6) Outreach, support and focus on underserved, especially females, minorities,
and economically disadvantaged
 Use technology
 Business & Education
Partnerships
 Secondary-postsecondary
alignment/career and college
readiness
On-going community and industry engagement
7) A communicated STEM plan is adopted across education, communities and
businesses
8) STEM work-based learning experiences, to increase interest and abilities in
fields requiring STEM skills, for each student and teacher
9) Business and community partnerships for mentorship, internship and other
STEM opportunities that extend the classroom walls
Connections with postsecondary education
10) Alignment of student’s career pathway with post-secondary STEM
program(s)
11) Credit completion at community colleges, colleges and/or universities *
STEM Recognition
An application process to recognize exemplary
STEM schools and STEM programs
– Articulates a common language for
implementation
– Built around a Implementation Rubric
– Outlines critical strengths “Attributes”
– Describes characteristics of high quality STEM
school/program
application located at: www.ncpublicschools.org/stem
Schools and Programs
…demonstrating evidence and implementing
all eleven* Attributes of a quality STEM
program at the “Prepared” or “Model” level
using the STEM Implementation Rubric will
be recognized.
*11 Attributes apply to high schools
10 Attributes apply to elementary and middle schools
Application and Guide
Choose to apply as either:
STEM School is an entire school focused on integration
of disciplinary areas of S, T, E, M plus other program
areas as needed to carry out the theme(s) of the school.
STEM Program is organized as a small learning
community to provide support of an educational
program for STEM career cluster(s). STEM programs
(academies) functions as a small school within a
comprehensive school.
Getting Started
Attribute Implementation Rubric
KEY
ELEMENT
(1) Curriculum: Project-based learning (PBL) with integrated content across STEM subjects
Early
Model
Prepared
Developing
1
1.2
Frequency of
STEM
Integration
Project-based learning is used
Project-based learning is regularly
monthly throughout all subject areas,
used throughout all subject areas,
which includes all STEM content areas which includes all STEM content areas
as well as additional subjects
as well as additional subjects
Up to 25% of STEM core and elective
teachers regularly make explicit efforts
to integrate science, technology,
engineering and math, requiring
students to organize knowledge across
disciplines
25-50% of STEM core and elective
teachers regularly make explicit
efforts to integrate science,
technology, engineering and math,
requiring students to organize
knowledge across disciplines
50-75% of STEM core and elective
teachers regularly make explicit
efforts to integrate science,
technology, engineering and math,
requiring students to organize
knowledge across disciplines
Over 75% of STEM core and elective
teachers regularly make explicit
efforts to integrate science,
technology, engineering and math,
requiring students to organize
knowledge across disciplines
1.3
Collaborati
ve PLCs
1
Project-based learning is used
monthly in all STEM content areas
Semiannually, STEM teachers share
STEM activities or ideas and plan
learning outcomes through
professional learning community
meetings and common planning time
Quarterly, STEM teachers share
STEM activities or ideas and plan
learning outcomes through
professional learning community
meetings and common planning time
Monthly, STEM teachers share STEM
activities or ideas and plan learning
outcomes through professional
learning community meetings and
common planning time
Weekly, STEM teachers share or cocreate STEM activities or ideas and
plan learning outcomes through
professional learning community
meetings and common planning time
1.4
Physical
Space
1.1
Frequen
cy of
PBL
1
1
Project-based learning is used rarely
in all STEM content areas
On special occasions computer labs or
classrooms are transformed into
collaborative spaces and project work
areas for face-to-face and/or virtual
collaboration among students and
teachers, or to be used as exhibition
spaces
Occasionally computer labs or
classrooms are transformed into
collaborative spaces and project work
areas for face-to-face and/or virtual
collaboration among students and
teachers, or to be used as exhibition
spaces
Frequently computer labs or
classrooms are transformed into
collaborative spaces and project work
areas for face-to-face and/or virtual
collaboration among students and
teachers, or to be used as exhibition
spaces; may include a STEM lab
One or more facilities or spaces are
available specifically for students to
collaborate and do project work; the
spaces can be used for face-to-face
and/or virtual collaboration among
students and teachers; they can also
be used as exhibition spaces; may
include a STEM lab
1
Project-based learning (PBL) activities have students working in small, collaborative groups; the groups go through a process of inquiry and eventually produce high-quality products/presentations; projects can mirror the real
work of professionals and move beyond classroom in purpose or audience
http://www.ncpublicschools.org/docs/stem/schools/rubrics/high-school.pdf
STEM Attribute Implementation Rubric – High School
STEM Rubric Components
North Carolina Schools
Principle
Integrated STEM Curriculum, Aligned with State, National, and Industry Standards (Principle)
Attribute
Early
Developing
Model
Program has documented
partnerships with other schools,
communities, postsecondary
institutions, and businesses to
identify solutions for executing a
quality STEM program
Program has multiple partnerships
with other schools, communities,
postsecondary institutions, and
businesses to identify solutions for
executing a quality STEM program;
partnerships are purposeful, mutually
beneficial, monitored, and evaluated
2.2 Students
and STEM
Professionals
Program is seeking to establish
Program engages with other schools,
partnerships with other schools,
communities, postsecondary
communities, postsecondary
institutions, and businesses to identify
institutions, and businesses to identify
solutions for executing a quality STEM
solutions for building a quality STEM
program
program
Levels of
Achievement
Prepared
Leaders are creating plans to provide
opportunities for students to meet
STEM professionals and to participate
in STEM learning environments
outside school
Direct experiences with STEM
professionals and STEM learning
environments during and/or outside
school2 are available to students 2
times throughout the year
Direct experiences with STEM
professionals and STEM learning
environments during and/or outside
school2 are available to students
monthly, and are directly connected
to in-class learning
Direct experiences with STEM
professionals and STEM learning
environments during and/or outside
school2 are available to students
weekly, and are directly connected to
in-class learning
2.3 Research
&
Development
Key
Elements
2.1 STEM Network
KEY
ELEMENT
(2) Curriculum: Connections to effective in- and out-of-school programs
On an annual basis, program leaders
and participating STEM teachers
share with each other research and
information on best practices related
to their STEM program goals
On a biannual basis, program
leaders and participating STEM
teachers share with each other
research and information on best
practices related to their STEM
program goals
On a quarterly basis, program
leaders and participating STEM
teachers frequently share with each
other research and best practices
related to their STEM program goals
On a monthly basis, program leaders
and participating STEM teachers
regularly share with each other
research and best practices related
to their STEM program goals
Quality
Indicators
Detail page of the NC STEM Attribute Implementation Rubric
NC DPI acknowledges and appreciates The Friday Institute at North Carolina State University for their collaboration
and the development of this rubric. Recommended citation for this rubric: Friday Institute for Educational
Innovation (2013). Middle School STEM Implementation Rubric. Raleigh, NC: Author
Attribute Implementation Rubric
• Outlines each Attribute individually
– Contains between 2-5 “Key Elements”
(components) for each Attribute
– Indicates Levels of Achievement an
“Implementation Continuum”
“Early”→”Developing”→”Prepared”→”Model”
– Includes “Quality Indicators” describing critical
strengths of the “Key Elements”
State Standards and Engineering
Connections
Science Essential Standards:
http://www.ncpublicschools.org/acre/standards/new-standards/
Technology Essential Standards:
http://www.ncpublicschools.org/acre/standards/new-standards/#it
Engineering Connections:
http://www.ncpublicschools.org/stem/resources/
Mathematics Common Core:
http://maccss.ncdpi.wikispaces.net/home
other content areas aligned to this project are to use State approved
Common Core or Essential Standards
Engineering Connections
http://www.ncpublicschools.org/docs/stem/resources/engineeringconnections/gradesk-12.pdf
Application Components
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Top page of NC STEM Recognition Application Packet
NC STEM Recognition Cover (Form A)
Application Contents Checklist (Form B)
NC STEM Attribute Implementation Rubrics
NC STEM Attribute Implementation Rubric Summary SelfAssessment School or Program Form (Form C1)
Or, NC STEM Attribute Implementation Rubric Summary SelfAssessment Future-Ready School/Program of Achievement Form
(Form C2)
NC STEM Attribute Response Template (Form D) which includes:
– Attribute/Key Element Response Evidences
Best Practice Evidence Response (Form E)
Signature page (Form F)
NC STEM Recognition
Application Top Page
NC STEM Recognition Cover
(Form A)
Application Contents Checklist
(Form B)
Attribute Rubric Summary Self-Assessment
School/Program (Form C1) page 1
Attribute Rubric Summary Self-Assessment
School/Program (Form C1) page 2
Attribute/Key Element Response
Evidences (Form D)
STEM Attribute Evidences
• Include evidences of STEM accomplishments
• Incorporate supporting data as appropriateuse student results/outcomes
• Supporting evidences may include 1 link for
the entire Attribute
• Remove personally identifiable information
Best Practice Evidence Response
(Form E)
Signature Page
(Form F)
STEM Application Timeline
Timeline
 Sept/Oct. 2014
 November 2014
 Dec./Jan. 2015
 April 2015
Process
 Schools receiving
site visits
 State Board of
Education
 Launch new
applications
 Applications due
STEM “Model” School
Attribute Self-Assessment
“Model” Level of Achievement
High School
Attribute Self-Assessment
“Model” Level of Achievement
High School Example
 6 of the 11 Attributes must be at the “Model”
Level of Achievement
 5 of the 11 Attributes must be either the
“Model” or “Prepared” Level of Achievement
 No Attributes & No Key Elements can be at
the “Developing” Level of Achievement
Attribute Self-Assessment - Example
“Model” Level E/M/H Schools
Any Attribute with 4 or More* Key Elements
*High Schools only
attribute 10
Only 1 Key Elements can be at the “Prepared” level for the
Attribute to be considered “Model”
Early
Key
Elements
Developing Prepared Model
Not “Model”
Not “Model”
“Model”
“Model”
Attribute Self-Assessment - Example
“Model” Level E/M/H Schools
Any Attribute with less than 4 Key Elements
none of the Key Elements can be at the “Prepared”
level for the Attribute to be considered “Model”
Early
Key
Elements
Developing Prepared
Model
Not “Model”
Not “Model”
“Model”
Attribute Self-Assessment
“Model” Level of Achievement
High School Example
 6 of the 11 Attributes must be at the “Model” Level of Achievement
 5 of the 11 Attributes must be either the “Model” or “Prepared” Level of
Achievement
 No Attributes & No Key Elements can be at the “Developing” Level of
Achievement
 Attributes with 4 Key Elements:
Only 1 Key Element may be “Prepared” for the
Attribute to be considered “Model”
 Attributes with 3 or less Key Elements:
No Key Elements may be at the “Prepared”
Level to be considered “Model” Achievement
Attribute Self-Assessment
“Model” Level of Achievement
Elementary/Middle School
Attribute Self-Assessment
“Model” Level of Achievement
Elementary/Middle School Example
 6 of the 10 Attributes must be at the “Model”
Level of Achievement
 4 of the 10 Attributes must be either the
“Model” or “Prepared” Level of Achievement
 No Attributes & No Key Elements can be at
the “Developing” Level of Achievement
Attribute Self-Assessment
“Model” Level of Achievement
Elementary/Middle School Example
 6 of the 10 Attributes must be at the “Model” Level of Achievement
 4 of the 10 Attributes must be either the “Model” or “Prepared” Level
of Achievement
 No Attributes & No Key Elements can be at the “Developing” Level of
Achievement
 Attributes with 4 Key Elements:
Only 1 Key Element may be “Prepared” for the
Attribute to be considered “Model”
 Attributes with 3 or less Key Elements:
No Key Elements may be at the “Prepared”
Level to be considered “Model” Achievement
Attribute Self-Assessment
“Prepared” Level of Achievement
High School
Attribute Self-Assessment
“Prepared” Level of Achievement
High School Example
 6 of the 11 Attributes must be at the
“Prepared” Level of Achievement
 5 of the 11 Attributes must be either the
“Prepared” or “Model” Level of Achievement
 No Attributes can be at the “Developing”
Level of Achievement
Attribute Self-Assessment
“Prepared” Level of Achievement
High School Example
 6 of the 11 Attributes must be at the “Prepared” Level of Achievement
 5 of the 11 Attributes must be either the “Prepared” or “Model” Level
of Achievement
 No Attributes can be at the “Developing” Level of Achievement
 Attributes with 4 Key Elements:
Only 1 Key Element may be “Developing” for
the Attribute to be considered “Prepared”
 Attributes with 3 or less Key Elements:
No Key Element may be “Developing” to be
considered “Prepared”
Attribute Self-Assessment
“Prepared” Level of Achievement
Elementary and Middle Schools
N/A
Attribute Self-Assessment – Example
“Prepared” Level E/M/H Schools
Any Attribute with 4 or more* Key Elements
*High Schools only
attribute 10
Only 1 Key Element can be at the “Developing” level for the
Attribute to be considered “Prepared”
Early
Key
Elements
Developing Prepared Model
Not “Prepared”
“Prepared”
“Prepared”
“Prepared"
“Prepared”
Attribute Self-Assessment – Example
“Prepared” Level E/M/H Schools
Any Attribute with less than 4 Key Elements
none of the Key Elements can be at the “Developing” level
for the Attribute to be considered “Prepared”
Early
Key
Elements
Developing Prepared
Model
Not “Prepared”
“Prepared”
“Prepared”
Attribute Self-Assessment
“Prepared” Level of Achievement
Elementary/Middle School Example
 6 of the 10 Attributes must be at the
“Prepared” Level of Achievement
 4 of the 10 Attributes must be either the
“Prepared” or “Model” Level of Achievement
 No Attributes can be at the “Developing”
Level of Achievement
Attribute Self-Assessment
“Prepared” Level of Achievement
Elementary/Middle School Example
 6 of the 10 Attributes must be at the “Prepared” Level of Achievement
 4 of the 10 Attributes must be either the “Prepared” or “Model” Level
of Achievement
 No Attributes can be at the “Developing” Level of Achievement
 Attributes with 4 Key Elements:
Only 1 Key Element may be “Developing” for
the Attribute to be considered “Prepared”
 Attributes with 3 or less Key Elements:
No Key Element may be “Developing” to be
considered “Prepared”
NC STEM RECOGNITION
Tina Marcus
Project Management, STEM Education and
Leadership
[email protected]
www.ncpublicschools.org/stem

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