Smart Grid Services

Report
Smart Grid Ireland is a not for profit, all-island advocacy network,
whose mission is to facilitate the delivery of a secure, affordable
and sustainable energy infrastructure, positioning Ireland at the
forefront of global smart grid development, to create longterm economic wealth and employment for the people of Ireland
Smart Grid Ireland is a founder member of
the Global Smart Grid Federation
White Papers
• Recent
– Grid-user interactions and interfaces (EVs)
– Smart Grid Interoperability
– Distributed Generation
• Upcoming workstreams
– Flexibility and System optimisation
– Grid Storage
– Smart Grids and Cybersecurity
See: www.smartgridireland.org
Smart Grid Services
A.Enabling the network to integrate users with new
requirements
B.Enhancing efficiency in day-to-day grid operation
C.Ensuring network security, system control and
quality of supply
D.Enabling better planning of future network
investment
E. Improving market functioning and customer
service
F. Enabling and encouraging stronger and more
direct involvement of consumers in their energy
usage and management
SGI WEBSITE
Thank You
[email protected]
Appendix 1
Additional Information
What Smart Grids will mean for Ireland
• Key Benefits by 2050 (Smart Grid Roadmap):
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net reduction in energy imports of over 4.3 Mtoe,
savings of €2.4 - 5.2bn in direct fuel offset (imports)
Onshore wind generation will be able to supply up to 33,000 GWh of the total demand
(over 70%)
annual savings of over 13 million tonnes of CO2
More than 30,000 Irish jobs will be created by the implementation of smart grid
infrastructure and its associated technologies
• What will look different:
– Smart metering available to all consumers to enable them to manage their energy usage
and cost
– Active demand response by consumers, integrating more renewables and lowering
energy costs
– Reliable and operationally effective energy networks at reduced cost
– Integration of variable distributed generation, storage, and EVs on low voltage
distribution system
– Significant decarbonisation of electricity production leading to decarbonisation of other
sectors such as heat and transport, thereby helping achieve the 202020 targets and
beyond.
– Ireland will be leaders in Smart Grid development in areas of RD&D, Product and Service
development leading to increased added value and employment for the economy, North
and South.
SGI Activities in Ireland
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Developed a detailed smart grid pilot project proposal for Northern Ireland that
was presented to the NI Assembly.
Facilitated the development of the ISLES project (£19m) involving Glen Dimplex
and SSE Renewables
Member of the Smart Grid Advisory Group to the Irish government which
produced a smart grid roadmap for Ireland and an opportunity matrix for
supporting inward investment
Sits on the advisory council for the Smart Grid Innovation Hub, which seeks to
reach out to SME entrepreneurs to develop new products for smart grid
challenges
Assisted in the promotion of the NAGZ project proposal (North Atlantic Green
Zone), a project of common interest (PCI) under the Connecting Europe Facility
(CEF) which will see an investment of over €100m in the electricity networks on
both sides of the border in the North West.
Brought together the Councils of Coleraine, Louth (ROI), and the Highlands and
Islands (Scotland) to scope a smart towns initiative for submission to INTERRREG V
Participated in multi-million euro Horizon 2020 projects proposals involving
Ireland (with ESB and UCD), Norway, Finland and Austria (2014)
Made significant submissions on consultations on energy policy and regulation
both in Ireland and NI.
Legal Structure
Sector
Legal Entity
Public / Private Sector Collaborative Networks
Smart Grid
Ireland
Smart Cities
Research
Group
Global Wind
Alliance
Home of the
Future
Membership Groups
Transferred to
standalone
entity
Advanced
Manufacturing
Global & Local
Membership
Networks
SGI Structure
SGI Board
Executive Cmte
Chair, Dep. Chair
CE, Sec + 3
Subcommittees
SGI Working Groups Leaders
WG Leaders drawn from Board
Members
SGI Working Groups
Associate Members
Web Portal /
publications etc.
SGI
Secretariat
(cforc)
SGI Executive Committee
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Paddy Turnbull GE
Chair
Tony Carroll
CEO
Bob Barbour (CforC)
Secretariat
Jerry O’Sullivan (MD, ESB Networks)
Gary O’Callaghan (Head of Siemens Energy)
Martin Dunlea (Global SG leader, Oracle)
Jim Rice (MD, Schneider Electric)
SGI and Smart Grid Advisory Group
Smart Grid
Advisory Group:
SEAI (convenor)
Smart Grid Ireland
ESB
Eirgrid
SFI
DCENR
IDA
EI
Smart Grid
Roadmap
(update 2013)
Smart Grid
Opportunity
Matrix
Update (2013)
Smart Grid
Testbed
Specification
Develop 2013
2013 work
programme
Smart Grid Ireland is a founder member of
the Global Smart Grid Federation
Major Smart Grid
Projects in Ireland
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Smart metering ROI: procurement phase:
2014; smart meters to 2m homes
Smart Metering NI: approved to proceed July
2012; public consultation 2014 on roll-out
DS3 (Eirgrid / SONI) integrating
unprecedented level of intermittent
renewables
eCars (ESB) national EV charging
infrastructure and supporting ICT
Quantum Green Way (Glen Dimplex) smart
home energy systems
FTTH (ESB JV) fibre on the network for
commercial return and smart grid automation
Smart Grid Innovation Hub: (Eirgrid and
NDRC) opening up SG to entrepreneurs
Multiple projects (ESB / NIE) on distribution
automation (including joint projects with
EPRI)
North Atlantic Green Zone (ROI and NI):
potential test bed for all SG technologies;
project of common interest at EU level;
investment of ~ €100m
Why are Smart Grids needed?
• The three main drivers of energy policy across the world: energy security,
affordability and climate change have created a paradigm shift in how
electricity networks are designed, built and operated, particularly with the
convergence of ICT and traditional electricity networks. In addition,
customers are becoming more involved in the energy system, not just for
energy savings but as producers as well.
• This has given rise to the concept of Smart Grid and a new ecosystem of
industry participants: adding ICT companies, data management and data
analytics to the existing traditional players.
• New technologies and techniques are continually emerging and being
developed to meet the challenges and no one sector or industry has all the
answers.
• In addition there are specific challenges unique to individual countries
which require tailored responses
• Smart Grid Ireland has been formed as a non-profit collaborative network
to provide the forum for that dialogue and support for the specific needs of
Ireland, North and South, to position Ireland as a leader in the
development of smart grids for the transformation of the energy sector and
to provide a stimulus for job creation.
Smart Grid Definition (EU)
• A Smart Grid is an electricity network that can cost efficiently integrate the
behaviour and actions of all users connected to it – generators, consumers
and those that do both – in order to ensure economically efficient,
sustainable power system with low losses and high levels of quality and
security of supply and safety.
•
A Smart Grid employs innovative products and services together with intelligent
monitoring, control, communication, and self-healing technologies in order to:
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Better facilitate the connection and operation of generators of all sizes and technologies.
Allow consumers to play a part in optimising the operation of the system.
Provide consumers with greater information and options for how they use their supply.
Significantly reduce the environmental impact of the whole electricity supply system.
Maintain or even improve the existing high levels of system reliability, quality and
security of supply.
– Maintain and improve the existing services efficiently.
– Foster market integration towards European integrated market.
See Appendix 1 for
expanded definitions and
expected services
Smart Grid Definition and high level services
• A Smart Grid is an electricity network that can cost efficiently
integrate the behaviour and actions of all users connected to it
– generators, consumers and those that do both – in order to
ensure economically efficient, sustainable power system with
low losses and high levels of quality and security of supply
and safety.
• The 6 high level services the Smart Grids Task Force defined
are :
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
Enabling the network to integrate users with new requirements
Enhancing efficiency in day-to-day grid operation
Ensuring network security, system control and quality of supply
Enabling better planning of future network investment
Improving market functioning and customer service
Enabling and encouraging stronger and more direct involvement of
consumers in their energy usage and management
A -Enabling the network to integrate users
with new requirements
• Outcome: Guarantee the integration of distributed
energy resources (both large and small-scale
intermittent renewable generation, heat pumps,
electric vehicles and storage) connected to the
distribution network.
• Provider: DSOs
• Primary beneficiaries: Generators, consumers
(including mobile consumers), storage owners.
B. Enhancing efficiency in day-to-day grid operation
• Outcome: Optimise the operation of distribution assets and
improve the efficiency of the network through enhanced
automation, monitoring, protection and real time operation.
Faster fault identification/resolution will help improve
continuity of supply levels.
• Better understanding and management of technical and nontechnical losses, and optimised asset maintenance activities
based on detailed operational information.
• Provider: DSOs, metering operators
• Primary beneficiaries: Consumers, generators, suppliers, DSOs
C. Ensuring network security, system control and
quality of supply
• Outcome: Foster system security through an intelligent and
more effective control of distributed energy resources,
ancillary back-up reserves and other ancillary services.
Maximise the capability of the network to manage
intermittent generation, without adversely affecting quality of
supply parameters.
• Provider: DSOs, aggregators, suppliers.
• Primary beneficiaries: Generators, consumers, aggregators,
DSOs, TSOs
D. Enabling better planning of future network
investment
• Outcome: Collection and use of data to enable more accurate
modelling of networks especially at LV level, also taking into
account new grid users, in order to optimise infrastructure
requirements and so reduce their environmental impact.
Introduction of new methodologies for more ‘active’
distribution, exploiting active and reactive control capabilities
of distributed energy resources.
• Provider: DSOs, metering operators.
• Primary beneficiaries: Consumers, generators, storage owners
E. Improving market functioning and customer service
• Outcome: Increase the performance and reliability of current
market processes through improved data and data flows
between market participants, and so enhance customer
experience.
• Provider: Suppliers (with applications and services providers),
power exchange platform providers, DSOs, metering
operators.
• Primary beneficiaries: Consumers, suppliers, applications and
services providers
Enabling and encouraging stronger and more direct
involvement of consumers in their
energy usage and management
•
•
Outcome: Foster greater consumption awareness taking advantage of smart
metering systems and improved customer information, in order to allow consumers
to modify their behaviour according to price and load signals and related
information.
Promote the active participation of all actors to the electricity market, through
demand response programmes and a more effective management of the variable and
non-programmable generation. Obtain the consequent system benefits: peak
reduction, reduced network investments, ability to integrate more intermittent
generation.
•
Provider: Suppliers (with metering operators and DSOs), ESCOs.
•
Primary beneficiaries: Consumers, generators. Indeed, consumers will benefit:
– either because these services will contribute to the 20/20/20 targets
– or directly through improvement of quality of supply and other services
•
The hypothesis made here is that company efficiency and the benefit of the
competitive market will be passed to consumers– at least partly - in the form of
tariff or price optimisation, and is dependent on effective regulation and markets.

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