Scenario 3 â** Maintaining standards of behaviour

Report
Personal style
Resources to support Charlie Taylor’s Improving Teacher Training for Behaviour
Behaviour Scenarios
Scenario 3: Maintaining standards of behaviour
This Scenario has been developed for Initial Teacher Training (ITT) to enable trainees to
demonstrate knowledge, skills and understanding of behaviour management
Personal style
Introduction
Behaviour2Learn has developed 17 Scenarios focusing on the 8 areas highlighted in the
Teaching Agency's document Improving teacher training for behaviour. These are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Personal Style
Self-management
Reflection
School Systems
Relationships
Classroom Management
More Challenging Behaviour
Theoretical Knowledge
Improving teacher training for behaviour has been developed by Charlie Taylor, the
Government’s expert adviser on behaviour, to complement the new Teachers’
Standards that all teachers have to demonstrate from September 2012.
2
Personal style
Scenario 3
Maintaining standards of behaviour
You have been teaching a class for several weeks and you feel that standards
of behaviour are slipping.
In your last lesson several individuals spent time chatting when they should
have been working. You repeatedly tried to get them back on task. One pupil
was particularly restless and disruptive. You spoke to him several times but he
continued to disturb the work of others.
What should you do now?
Personal style
Key Learning Outcomes
• Knowledge of positive techniques, including the use of the language of
choice, for maintaining high standards of behaviour.
• Practice in the use of techniques which are appropriate for your attributes
and the context in which you are teaching.
• Understanding of the need to reinforce standards constantly and
consistently.
Personal style
What do you do?
Consider these responses and choose the best one(s) In the next lesson:
1.
Make an example of the pupil who showed unacceptable behaviour and tell the class
that you will not tolerate it.
2.
Remind the class of the agreed Code of Conduct. Set a clear behaviour objective for
the lesson about staying on task. Review the outcome positively with the class at the
end of the lesson.
3.
Tell the class how disappointed you were with them and that you will punish them all if
their behaviour does not improve.
4.
Stop the class every time someone does something out of keeping with the Code of
Conduct and explain why this is wrong.
5.
Use praise and rewards whenever appropriate to reinforce actions in keeping with the
objective.
6.
Warn the class about possible sanctions and then apply them strictly.
7.
Speak quietly to the pupil who behaved badly. Set a behaviour objective for him and
review it with him at the end of the lesson.
Personal style
What might be the best choice?
2. Remind the class of the agreed Code of Conduct. Set a clear behaviour objective about
staying on task for the lesson. Review the outcome positively at the end of the lesson.
7. Speak quietly to the pupil who behaved badly. Set a behaviour objective for him and
review it with him at the end of the lesson.
5. Use praise and rewards whenever appropriate to reinforce behaviour in keeping with
the objective.
To be effective in promoting the desired learning behaviours, a Code of Conduct has to be
reinforced continually. Each lesson provides a fresh opportunity for this.
Building on the positive is more effective in improving behaviour than dwelling on the
negative.
Using the Code helps to depersonalise responses to negative behaviour by correcting the
behaviour without rejecting the pupil.
Often you need a combination of actions to correct a situation and improve learning
behaviour.
Personal style
How might you prevent a recurrence?
•
Ensure that your Code of Conduct :
tells pupils and teachers what they are expected to do
relates to general rather than specific behaviours
is short and easily displayed and understood
reflects rights as well as responsibilities
is suitable for regular teaching and reminding.
•
Set a behaviour objective from the Code of Conduct for each lesson.
•
Use praise to reinforce wanted behaviour.
•
Help pupils to take responsibility for their behaviour by using the language of
choice e.g. “I would like you to complete this piece of work because it will help
you understand the next lesson. If you choose not to complete it during this
lesson, you will have to do it at another time and that will be inconvenient for
you”.
Personal style
Underlying Principles
• Maintaining consistent standards of behaviour for learning requires
frequent reminders about agreed expectations.
• Praise for abiding by the Code of Conduct is more effective than sanctions
for breaking it. Indeed, sanctions on their own rarely correct negative
behaviour - they only provide a respite in which to establish and then
reward the desired positive behaviour.
• An established Code of Conduct helps the teacher to correct negative
behaviour and establish positive behaviour by using the language of
choice.
• Applying the Code of Conduct to correct behaviour depersonalises the
process and thus helps to maintain positive relationships between pupils
and teachers.
Personal style
Rights and Responsibilities
• A Code of Conduct should take into account the rights and responsibilities
of all concerned.
• All pupils have the right to learn in a harmonious and well ordered
environment.
• It is everyone’s responsibility to behave in ways that support the learning
of all.
• Maintaining a positive classroom climate is one of the basic
responsibilities of the teacher who has the right in law to discipline pupils
in line with the school Behaviour Policy.
• Governors decide the principles on which the school Behaviour Policy is
based and headteachers have the responsibility in law to draw up the
policy and ensure that it is implemented.
Personal style
Activities to try
• At the start of a lesson, set a learning behaviour intention based on a
behaviour from the Code of Conduct for the class. Play “Catch you being
good” – tell pupils you will be spotting those who behave well, meeting
the objective. Praise them when you do. Summarise at the end of the
lesson by agreeing a learning behaviour mark for the class as a whole with
them.
• Hold a discussion with pupils on what they consider to be good and bad
rules. Decide what effect their views on this should have on your practice.
• Examine a school Behaviour Policy to see how well it matches the
guidance from the DfE.
Personal style
Conclusions
Maintaining consistent standards of learning behaviour requires frequent
reminders about agreed expectations.
To be effective in promoting the desired learning behaviours, a Code of Conduct has
to be reinforced continually. Each lesson provides a fresh opportunity for this.
Building on the positive is more effective in improving behaviour than dwelling on
the negative and rules should tell us what to do, rather than what not to do. They
should be easy to understand and remember.
Praise for abiding by the Code is more effective than sanctions for breaking it.
Sanctions on their own rarely correct negative behaviour . They only provide a
respite in which to establish and then reward the desired behaviour.
Using the Code helps to depersonalise responses to negative behaviour by
correcting the behaviour without rejecting the pupil.
Often you need a combination of actions to correct a situation and improve
learning behaviour.
Personal style
Developed in partnership with
www.ncflb.com
12

similar documents