Day - Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education

Report
GMA Mayor’s Day
January 26, 2014
1. Examine the Data for Education in Georgia
2. Economic Impact of Georgia Non-Graduates
3. Strengthening the Birth to Work Pipeline
4. What Can We Do?
Examine the Data for Education in Georgia
Academic Achievement Milestones
School Readiness
Literacy by 3rd Grade
Numeracy by 8th Grade
High School Graduation
Workforce and/or College Ready
School Readiness
Percent of Children with School Readiness Skills
NAEP 4th Grade Reading
Percent At or Above Proficient
39%
37%
37%
35%
35%
35%
33%
34%
33%
31%
32%
31%
20th State
32%
U.S.
30%
29%
27%
34%
Georgia
28%
28%
26%
25%
2005
2007
2009
2011
2013
NAEP 8th Grade Math
Percent At or Above Proficient
40%
38%
36%
36%
31%
34%
20th State
31%
28%
29%
29%
25%
24%
23%
20%
2005
2007
2009
2011
U.S.
Georgia
27%
26%
22%
34%
33%
30%
28%
37%
35%
34%
32%
37%
2013
Georgia High School Graduation Rates
Statewide
High School DropOuts
Year
Fulton County
State
High School
Graduation Rate
2011
70.1%
67.5%
21,844
2012
71.3%
69.7%
22,155
2013
75.5%
71.5%
21,401
65,400
Source: The Governor’s Office of Student Achievement, State Report Cards.
Economic Impact of Georgia Non-Graduates
Education Pays
EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT & EMPLOYMENT
Unemployment Rate*
15%
10%
5%
Median Wkly Earnings**
(& approx. annual)
November 2013
0%
0
200
600
3.4
Bachelor’s Degree
& Higher
$1,189
6.4
Some college/
Associate Degree
$741 ($38,523)
7.3
HS Graduates, No
College
$651
($33,852)
Less than a High
School Diploma
$457
($23,764)
10.8
1000
($61,828)
Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Table A-4. Employment status of the civilian population 25 years and over by educational attainment.
**U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Table 5. Quartiles of usual weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers.
High School Graduation Rates by County, 2012
Unemployment Rate by County, May 2013
Compounded Impacts of
High School Non-Completion
INDIVIDUALS
THE COMMUNITY
Lower Lifetime Earnings
Reduced buying power & tax
revenues; less economic growth
Decreased health status; Higher
mortality rates; More criminal
activity
Higher health care & criminal
justice costs
Higher teen pregnancy rates;
Single motherhood
Higher public services costs
Less voting; Less volunteering
Low rate of community
involvement
Source: Levin, H., et al., (2007). The Costs and Benefits of an Excellent Education for All of America’s Children.
Strengthening the Birth to Work Pipeline
Strengthening the Birth to Work Pipeline
KEY
ISSUE
#1
Early Life Experiences
KEY
ISSUE
#2
Academic Achievement K-12
KEY
ISSUE
#3
Transitions to Work or College
Disparities in Early Vocabulary Growth
Professional
Families
1,116 words
1200
Vocabulary Size
1000
Working Class
Families
749 words
800
600
Welfare
Families
525 words
400
200
0
9
12
15
18
21
24
27
30
33
Age of child in months
Source: Hart, B. and Risley, T. R. (2003). “The Early Catastrophe: The 30 Million Word Gap by Age 3.”
36
Economic Benefits of Early Education:
Perry Preschool Study
No-Program group
Program group
7%
Earn $2,000+ monthly
29%
45%
Graduated HS on time
66%
20%
Never on welfare as adult
41%
0%
20%
40%
60%
Source: Schweinhart, L.J., et al. (2005). Lifetime effects: The High/Scope Perry Preschool study through age 40.
80%
Achievement Gap as Children Enter Kindergarten
Essential Building Blocks of
High Performing States
 Higher Standards
 Rigorous Curriculum
 Clear Accountability System
 Statewide Student Information System
 Leadership Training
The Changing Face of Georgia
2001-2010: Percent Population Increase
Hispanic 49%
Asian 45%
Living in poverty
38%
African-American
20%
All 16%
White 8%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
4-Year Graduation Rate, 2013
Georgia
Fulton County
All
72%
76%
Asian
82%
94%
White
79%
91%
African-American
64%
63%
Hispanic
62%
62%
Low-Income
63%
61%
English Language
Learners
44%
51%
100 Georgia Ninth Graders
* Data provided by the Technical College System of Georgia . Based on 2008 graduation data
Predicted Workforce Gap
Georgia’s Young Workforce
with a Certificate or College
Degree
60% Complete
College Georgia
250,000 additional
graduates
42%
43% Current Path
2012
Source: Complete College Georgia,: Georgia’s Higher Education Completion Plan 2012
2020
HS Graduates and Economic Development
• With an additional 30,000 HS graduates:
– $242 million increased earnings
– $191 million increased spending
• This additional spending would support:
– $350 million increase in state gross product
– $18 million increase in state tax revenue
Source: Alliance for Excellent Education. “The Economic Benefits of Helping High School Dropouts.” December 2012.
Georgia’s Future Workforce
1. Increasing demand for highly skilled labor force
+
2. Changing demographics
+
3. Increasing academic rigor and expectations
=
Perfect Storm?
Trifecta of Opportunity?
What can we do?
Profile of Child, Family and Community
Wellbeing – Fulton County*
Indicator
Year
Fulton Rate
Georgia Rate
Low birth weight
2011
10.6%
9.4%
Teen pregnancies, ages 15-17 (per 1,000)
2011
29.5
28.1
Substantiated incidents of Child Abuse and/or
neglect (per 1,000)
2012
4.4
8.0
Incidences of STDs, ages 15-19 (per 1,000)
2011
43.6
31.6
Children absent more than 15 days from school
2011
7.2%
8.8%
Teens not in school and not working, ages 1619
2010
9.2%
10.8%
High school graduates eligible for HOPE
scholarship
2011
44.2%
40.2%
Children living with single parent
2010
37.8%
32.7%
Children living in poverty
2011
27.0%
26.6%
* Data provided by Georgia Kids Count, Georgia Family Connection Partnership, http://www.gafcp.org
3rd Grade Reading Achievement in Georgia:
Closing the Gaps
% of Students Exceeding Standards
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
2010
All
2011
Black
Source: Georgia Department of Education.
Hispanic
2012
White
2013
Low-Income
8th Grade Math Achievement in Georgia:
Closing the Gaps
% of Students Exceeding Standards
45%
40%
35%
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
0%
2010
All
2011
Black
Source: Georgia Department of Education.
Hispanic
2012
White
2013
Low-Income
High School Graduation Rates in Georgia:
Closing the Gaps
85%
80%
78%
79%
70%
72%
75%
70%
64%
62%
63%
65%
62%
61%
60%
60%
55%
50%
2012
All
Black
Source: Georgia Department of Education.
2013
Hispanic
White
Low-Income
How Will You Insulate the Birth to Work Pipeline?
ESSENTIAL COMMUNITY SERVICES
Transportation
Early
Childhood
Childcare
Providers
Health
Housing
K – 12 System
Afterschool
Civic
Programs Opportunities
Financial
Post
Secondary
Academic
Supports
LEARNING & SOCIAL SUPPORTS
Source: The Forum for Youth Investment
Work &
Career
Job
Training
Help Insulate the Pipeline
Read to children every day
Early
Childhood
Quality Rated: Encourage participation of your
early learning centers
Read and mentor students
K – 12 System
Leverage partnerships with business and postsecondary
Build a cadre of effective teachers and leaders
Provide internships/ apprenticeships
Post
Secondary
Be involved as a community volunteer in Georgia Apply
to College
Increase the number of post-secondary graduates
Aligning Educational Strategies
Random Acts of Improvement
GOALS
Aligned Acts of Improvement
GOALS
Connect with us
Twitter: @GAPartnership
Facebook: Georgia Partnership for
Excellence in Education
Instagram: @GAPARTNERSHIP
LinkedIn: Georgia Partnership for
Excellence in Education
Website: www.gpee.org

similar documents