Champs Lesson 2

Report
Lesson 2 • Motivation
Enhance Students’ Desire to Succeed
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Lesson 2 • Motivation
Enhance Students’ Desire to Succeed
Two Factors Affecting
Motivation
• Value
Expectancy x Value = Motivation
If either value is 0 . . .
– The degree to which
one values the rewards
that accompany
succeeding at that task.
• Expectancy
– The degree to which an
individual expects to be
successful at the task.
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Lesson 2 • Motivation
Enhance Students’ Desire to Succeed
• The first two tasks focus on increasing the
Expectancy factor in the motivation equation.
Expectancy x Value = Motivation
If either value is 0 . . .
• These are tasks you can implement to
enhance students’ belief in their ability to be
successful.
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Task 1: Present Tasks in a Manner
That Will Generate Enthusiasm
I have identified specific ways I can present
tasks to students which will generate
enthusiasm and intrinsic motivation on their
part. These include, but are not limited to:
• explaining how or why the task will be
useful to students;
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Task 1: Present Tasks in a Manner
That Will Generate Enthusiasm
• giving students a vision of what they will
eventually be able to do;
• relating new tasks to previously learned
skills; and
• rallying the enthusiasm and energy of
students, particularly when I ask them
to do something difficult or challenging.
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Task 2: Implement Effective Instruction Practices
I understand that instructional style has a
significant impact on student behavior. I have
identified one or two aspects of my
presentation style that I will work to improve
the course of the year.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ss2hULhX
f04
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Task 2: Implement Effective Instruction Practices
I have made plans to improve my
presentational style by:
• Varying the tone of my voice to avoid
monotony
• Varying the intensity of my presentation
so I am not always excited or always calm
• Using humor
• Clarifying lesson purpose
• Clarifying information
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Task 2: Implement Effective Instruction Practices
I have made plans to actively involve students in
lessons. Following are strategies I can use:
• Asking questions
• Giving students tasks to work on in pairs
• Presenting small tasks for students to work on
independently
• Giving mini quizzes
• Setting up role plays
• Presenting guided practice of tasks students will
work on later
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Task 2: Implement Effective Instruction Practices
• Think of an idea beyond those suggested in this
program for actively involving students in lesson.
Be ready to share your ideas with others.
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Games
Student teach
Scavenger hunt
Teacher participate with students
What if…
When did you get it?
Use technology – video clips, etc.
Simultaneous round table
Bust the teacher
Whole-brain learning (proper noun – straight; improper – slouch)
Projects
Lesson 2 • Motivation
Enhance Students’ Desire to Succeed
• The next four tasks focus on increasing the
Value factor Motivation equation.
Expectancy x Value = Motivation
If either value is 0 . . .
• These are tasks you can implement to
enhance students’ motivation to:
– follow your rules.
– achieve your goals and instructional expectations.
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Task 3: Build Positive Relationships
with Students
• When you build
positive
relationships and
provide frequent
positive feedback,
you motivate
students to
demonstrate their
best behavior.
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Task 3: Build Positive Relationships
with Students
• Students work harder when they like and
respect their teacher and feel the teacher
cares about them.
• One way to demonstrate to students that
you value them as individuals is through
the use of non-contingent attention.
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Task 3: Build Positive Relationships
with Students
• Non-contingent
attention, involves
giving students time
and attention not
because of anything
they’ve done, but
just because you
notice and value
them as people.
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Task 3: Build Positive Relationships
with Students
• I have considered how I will provide each of my
students with non-contingent attention—
including, but not limited to, the following:
– Greet students.
– Show an interest in student work.
– Invite students to ask for assistance.
– Have conversations with students, when
possible.
– Make a special effort to talk with any
student with whom I interacted regarding
misbehavior.
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Task 3: Build Positive Relationships
with Students
Take note
Students often believe that if the teacher corrects
their behavior, the teacher does not like them.
Even high school teachers report that students
have this misconception.
By providing noncontingent attention or specific
praise as soon as possible after correcting a
student’s misbehavior, you send the message
that you still care for the student and dissolve
the tension the student may feel.
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Task 3: Build Positive Relationships
with Students
• Dr. Vern Jones (1998), expert on student
discipline and motivation:
– Each time you interact with a student and show an
interest in him or her as a person, you make a deposit.
– If you make enough deposits, there will be reserve
capital for those times when your may have to make a
withdrawal because of student misbehavior.
– Whether the withdrawal consists of a gentle
reprimand, a discussion or a consequence, the more
you have invested in the student, the more likely
he/she is to understand that you are trying to help by
correcting the behavior.
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Task 3: Build Positive Relationships
with Students
• Showing an interest in students and acting
friendly does not mean you should try to be a
friend or a peer.
– You are the teacher;
– You do not want to be so friendly that you seem
to be an equal;
– You are the person in authority, and
– You are the one that needs to intervene if there
are rule violations.
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Task 4: Provide Positive Feedback
There are six hallmarks of effective positive
feedback. Feedback should be:
• Accurate
• Specific and descriptive
• Contingent
• Age-appropriate
• Given immediately
• Given in a manner that fits your style
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Task 4: Provide Positive Feedback
I have considered the structure level of my
class in determining how much positive
feedback I need to give, realizing that high
structure classes will need more positive
feedback.
But I also realize that even low structure
classes will have students who cease to try
to meet expectations if they do not receive
positive feedback.
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Task 4: Provide Positive Feedback
If any student seems to be responding to
my positive feedback with an increase in
inappropriate behavior, I am prepared to
make modifications to the feedback I am
giving.
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Task 4: Provide Positive Feedback
WHEN STUDENTS RESPOND NEGATIVELY TO POSITIVE FEEDBACK
• Common phenomenon
– Embarrassed by the feedback
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Try modifying your feedback
Make feedback more private
Eliminating pauses
Make sure it is age appropriate
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Task 4: Provide Positive Feedback
• Student may have an image of himself as being tough
and feels they have to uphold that image or have
trouble handling success.
– Treat the misbehavior (the downturn after receiving
positive feedback) as a momentary interruption in the
student’s success.
– At a neutral and reasonably private time talk to the
student about her tendency to misbehave after getting
positive feedback
– Find a way to give the positive feedback more privately.
– Switch from giving specific descriptive feedback to simply
interacting with the student when she is behaving
responsibly.
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Task 5: Strive to Provide a High Ratio
of Positive Interactions
• I understand how
important it is for me to
interact with each of my
students at least three
times more when they
are behaving responsibly
than when they are
misbehaving.
• That is a 3:1 ratio.
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Task 5: Strive to Provide a High Ratio
of Positive Interactions
This behavior
management is one
of the most
essential but also
one of the most
difficult to
implement.
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Task 5: Strive to Provide a High Ratio
of Positive Interactions
• Remember, each time you give attention to a
student, you may be reinforcing the behavior
you are paying attention to- whether the
behavior is positive or negative.
• Thus, you should pay at least 3 times more
attention to students when they are exhibiting
positive behavior than when they are
exhibiting negative behavior.
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Task 5: Strive to Provide a High Ratio
of Positive Interactions
• Why:
– Some students are starved for
attention.
– The form of attention may not
matter.
• A reprimand for misbehaving
may satisfy this student’s desire
for attention. In fact, the
scolding may be even more
satisfying because it probably
lasts longer and involves greater
emotional intensity from the
teacher.
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Task 6: Provide Intermittent Celebrations
• Periodically reward
both individual students
and the whole class
with a celebration that
acknowledges their
progress and success in
meeting behavioral and
academic goals.
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Task 6: Provide Intermittent Celebrations
• Make rewards unpredictable &
meaningful
• Key is to use these celebrations
as sparingly as possible but as
frequently as necessary.
– Examples:
• sending students to another
teacher to see their work.
• Calling parents and
informing parent of
progress.
• Playing music during
writing/working assignment.
• Be creative about your
intermittent celebrations.
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Task 6: Provide Intermittent Celebrations
• Based on the level of structure I have
determined my students need, I will plan
on using intermittent celebrations:
– Rarely
– Occasionally
– Frequently
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Task 6: Provide Intermittent Celebrations
• I have identified (or have a plan for how I
can identify) the kinds of rewards that are
likely to be most useful with my students.
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Conclusion
This lesson covered
six strategies that
can help improve
students motivation
to follow your rules,
strive toward your
Guidelines for
Success and achieve
your goals and
instructional
expectations.

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