Test 1 Review

Report
Review 1.1
A population in statistics means a collection
of all
a. Men and women
b. Subjects or objects of interest
c. People living in a country
Review 1.2
A sample in statistics means a portion of the
a. People selected from the population of a
country
b. People selected from the population of an
area
c. Population of interest
Review 1.3
Indicate which of the following is an
example of a sample with replacement and
which is a sample without replacement.
a. Five friends go to a livery stable and
select five horses to ride.
b. A box contains five marbles of different
colors. A marble is drawn from this box,
its color is recorded and it is put back in
the box before the next marble is drawn.
The experiment is repeated 12 times.
Review 1.4
Indicate which of the following variables are
quantitative and which are qualitative.
Classify the quantitative variables as
discrete or continuous.
a. Women’s favorite TV programs.
b. Salaries of football players.
c. Number of pets owned by families.
d. Favorite breed of dog for each of 20
persons.
Review 2.2


The following table gives the frequency
distribution of times that 90 fans spent
waiting in line to by tickets.
Hours waiting
Frequency
0-6
5
7-13
27
14-20
30
21-27
20
28-34
8
The number of classes in the table =
Review 2.2
Hours waiting
Frequency
0-6
5
7-13
27
14-20
30
21-27
20
28-34
8
The class width =
 The midpoint of the third class =
 The lower boundary of the second class =

Review 2.2
Hours waiting
Frequency
0-6
5
7-13
27
14-20
30
21-27
20
28-34
8
The upper limit of the second class =
 The sample size =
 The relative frequency of the second class
=

Review 2.5

A large Midwestern city has been
chronically plagued by false fire alarms.
The following data set gives the number of
false alarms set off each week for a 24week period in this city.
10
12
5
4
11
1
8
8
14
7
1
5
3
6
15
7
5
3
10
13
2
9
6
7
Review 2.5
10
12
5
i)
ii)
4
11
1
8
8
14
7
1
5
3
6
15
7
5
3
10
13
2
9
6
7
Construct a frequency distribution table.
Take 1 as the lower limit and 3 as the
width of each class.
Calculate the relative frequencies and
percentages for all classes.
Review 3.1
The value of the middle term in a ranked
data set is called the
a) Mean
b) Median
c) Mode

Review 3.2
Which of the following measures is/are
influenced by extreme values (outliers)?
a) Mean
b) Median
c) Mode
d) Range

Review 3.3
Which of the following summary measures
can be calculated for qualitative data?
a) Mean
b) Median
c) Mode

Review 3.4
Which of the following can have more than
one value?
a) Mean
b) Median
c) Mode

Review 3.5
Which of the following is obtained by
taking the difference between the largest
and smallest values of the data set?
a) Variance
b) Range
c) Mean

Review 3.6
Which of the following is the mean of the
squared deviations of x values from the
mean?
a) Standard Deviation
b) Population Variance
c) Sample Variance

Review 3.7
The values of the variance and standard
deviation are
a) Never negative
b) Always positive
c) Never zero

Review 3.8
A summary measure calculated for the
population data is called
a) A population parameter
b) A sample statistic
c) An outlier

Review 3.9
A summary measure for the sample data
is called
a) A population parameter
b) A sample statistic
c) An outlier

Review 3.10
Chebyshev’s theorem can be applied to
a) Any distribution
b) Bell-shaped distributions only
c) Skewed distributions only

Review 3.11
The empirical rule can be applied to
a) Any distribution
b) Bell-shaped distributions only
c) Skewed distributions only

Review 3.15

Calculate the mean, median, mode, range,
variance, and standard deviation for the
following sample data.
9
18
6
7
28
3
14
16
2
6
Review 3.19

The following table gives the frequency
distribution of the numbers of computers sold
during the past 25 weeks at a computer store.
Computers Sold
Frequency
4 to 9
2
10 to 15
4
16 to 21
10
22 to 27
6
28 to 33
3
Calculate the mean, variance, and standard
deviation.
Review 3.20
The cars owned by all people living in a
city are, on average, 7.3 years old with a
standard deviation of 2.2 years.
 Using Chebyshev’s theorem, find a least
what percentage of the cars in the city are
i) 2.32 to 12.28 years old
ii) .7 to 13.9 years old

Review 3.21
The ages of cars owned by all people
living in a city have a bell-shaped
distribution with a mean of 7.3 years and
a standard deviation of 2.2 years.
 Using the empirical rule, find the
percentage of cars in this city that are
i) 5.1 to 9.5 years old
ii) .7 to 13.9 years old

Review 4.1
The collection of all outcomes for an
experiment is called
a) A sample space
b) The intersection of events
c) Joint probability

Review 4.2
A final outcome of an experiment is called
a) A compound event
b) A simple event
c) A complementary event

Review 4.3
A compound event includes
a) All final outcomes
b) Exactly two outcomes
c) More than one outcome for an
experiment

Review 4.4
Two equally likely events
a) Have the same probability of occurrence
b) Cannot occur together
c) Have no effect on the occurrence of each
other

Review 4.5
Which of the following probability
approaches can be applied only to
experiments with equally likely outcomes?
a) Classical probability
b) Empirical probability
c) Subjective probability

Review 4.6
Two mutually exclusive events
a) Have the same probability
b) Cannot occur together
c) Have no effect on the occurrence of each
other.

Review 4.7
Two independent events
a) Have the same probability
b) Cannot occur together
c) Have no effect on the occurrence of each
other.

Review 4.8
The probability of an event is always
a) Less than 0
b) In the range 0.0 to 1.0
c) Greater than 1.0

Review 4.9
The sum of the probabilities of all final
outcomes of an experiment is always
a) 100
b) 1
c) 0

Review 4.10
The joint probability of two mutually
exclusive events is always
a) 1.0
b) Between 0 and 1
c) 0

Review 4.11
Two independent events are
a) Always mutually exclusive
b) Never mutually exclusive
c) Always complementary

Review 4.12

A couple is planning their wedding
reception. The bride’s parents have given
them a choice of four reception facilities,
three caterers, five DJ’s, and two limo
services. If the couple randomly selects
one reception facility, one caterer, one DJ,
and one limo service, how many different
outcomes are possible?
Review 4.13
Lucia graduate this year with an accouting
degree from Eastern Connecticut State
University. She has received job offers from an
accounting firm, an insurance company, and an
airline. She cannot decide which of the three
job offers she should accept. Suppose she
decides to randomly select on of these job
offers. Find the probability that the job offer
selected is
 From the insurance company
 Not from the accounting firm.
Review 4.14
There are 200 students in a particular graduate
program at a state university. Of them, 110 are
female and 125 are out-of-state students. Of the
100 females, 70 are out-of-state students.
a) Are the events “female” and “out-of-state
student” independent? Mutually exclusive?
b) If one of these 200 students is selected at
random, what is the probability that the student
selected is male? Out-of-state given she is
female? Out-of-state or female?
c) 2 are selected and both are out of state?
Review 2.17
The probability that an adult has ever
experienced a migraine headache is .35. If
two adults are randomly selected, what is
the probability that neither of them has ever
experienced a migraine headace?
Review 4.18

A hat contains 5 green, 8 red, and seven
blue marbles. Let A be the even that a
red marble is drawn if we randomly select
one marble out of the hat. What is the
probability of A? What is the
complementary event of A? What is its
probability?
Review 4.19
The probability that a randomly selected
student from a college is a female is .55 and
the probability that a student works for more
than 10 hours per week is .2. If these two
events are independent, find the probability
that a randomly selected student is
a) Male and works for more than 10 hours per
week.
b) Female or works for more than 10 hours per
week
Review 4.20
A sample was selected of 506 workers who
currently receive two weeks of paid vacation
per year. These workers were asked if they
were willing to accept a small pay cut to get
an additional week of paid vacation a year.
The following table shows the responses of
these workers.
Review 4.20
Yes
No
No Response
Man
77
140
32
Woman
104
119
34
a) If one person is selected at random from these 506
workers, find the probability that
i) P(yes)
ii)P(yes | woman)
iii)P(woman and no)
iv)P(no response or woman)
b) Are the events “woman” and “yes” independent? Mutually
exclusive?

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