Implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards

Report
Implementation of the Next
Generation Science Standards
Leveraging the Common Core
Kim Feltre, K-12 Science Supervisor, Hillsborough Township Public Schools
Michelle Hill, High School Teacher, Hillsborough Township Public Schools
February 10, 2015
NJASCD
NORMS
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Recognize that there is more to learn than time
permits so this work is fast-paced and warrants
your full attention
Stay attentive to the task at hand
Ask questions and share your thinking
Focus on what we can do
Remain positive and constructive
Have fun and celebrate learning!
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THE POWER OF THE NGSS
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NJCCCS DIFFERENCES FROM NGSS
Science
Practice
Content
Statement
Performance
Expectations
Cumulative Progress
Indicator
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UNDERSTANDING THE NGSS
Assessments
Curricula
Instruction
Teacher
Development
To understand and successfully implement
NGSS, it is CRITICAL to understand this
Framework and its vision for science teaching
and learning since it is the basis for the NGSS. 5
A FRAMEWORK FOR K-12 SCIENCE EDUCATION
“the framework seeks to illustrate
how knowledge and practice must
be intertwined in designing
learning experiences in K-12
science education” – NRC
Framework for K-12 Science
Education
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INTEGRATION OF THE THREE DIMENSIONS
The practices are the
processes of building
and using the core
ideas to make sense of
the natural and
designed world, and
the cross cutting
concepts hold the
discipline together.
Practices
Crosscutting
Concepts
Core Ideas
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The Framework seeks to illustrate how knowledge and practice must be intertwined in designing learning
experiences in K-12 science education. (Appendix E – p. 1)
NGSS
Science and Engineering Practices
1. Asking questions (for science)
and defining problems (for
engineering)
2. Developing and using models
3. Planning and carrying out
investigations
4. Analyzing and interpreting
data
5. Using mathematics and
computational thinking
6. Constructing explanations (for
science) and designing
solutions (for engineering)
7. Engaging in argument from
evidence
8. Obtaining, evaluating, and
communicating information
Disciplinary Core Ideas
Physical Science
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Matter and its interactions
Motion and stability:Forces and
interactions
Energy
Waves and their applications in
technologies for information transfer
Life Science
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From molecules to organisms:
structures and processes
Ecosystems: interactions, energy, and
dynamics
Heredity: inheritance and variation of
traits
Biological evolution: unity and
diversity
Earth and Space Science
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Earth’s place in the universe
Earth’s systems
Earth and human activity
Crosscutting Concepts
1. Patterns
2. Cause and effect:mechanism
and explanation
3. Scale, proportion, and
quantity
4. Systems and system models
5. Energy and matter: flows,
cycles, and conservation
6. Structure and function
7. Stability and change
COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS
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CONCEPTUAL SHIFTS
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knowing about → figuring out
recitation → reasoning
COMMONALITY BETWEEN CCSS AND NGSS
ALL the standards — math, ELA and science
— require that teachers focus more attention
on disciplinary “practices”
There’s a common core in all of the standards documents
(ELA, Math, and Science)
At the core is:
• Reasoning with evidence
• Building arguments and critiquing the
arguments of others
• Participating in reasoning-oriented
practices with others
From: NSTA Webinar: “Connections Between Practices in NGSS, Common Core Math, and Common Core ELA”, by
Sarah Michaels Feb 12, 2013
ACTIVITY
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Shake the jar (shake but don’t break)
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Record observations of the changes you see
CER FRAMEWORK
Claim - a conclusion about a
problem (answers a questions)
Evidence - scientific data that is
appropriate and sufficient to
support the claim
Reasoning - a justification that
shows why the data counts as
evidence to support the claim and
includes appropriate scientific
principles
Evidence
Evidence
Claim
Evidence
Reasoning
Adapted from Toulmin (1958)
CONCEPTUAL SHIFTS
●
●
knowing about → figuring out
recitation → reasoning
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING PRACTICES
1. Asking questions (for science) and defining problems
(for engineering)
2. Developing and using models
3. Planning and carrying out investigations
4. Analyzing and interpreting data
5. Using mathematics and computational thinking
6. Constructing explanations (for science) and designing
solutions (for engineering)
7. Engaging in argument from evidence
8. Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information
WHY ARGUMENTATION?
argumentation – the action or process of reasoning
systematically in support of an idea, action, or theory
Joe Krajcik, NSTA Webinar: Preparing for the Next Generation Science Standards – Engaging in Argument from
Evidence http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NGSS/webseminar11.aspx
S&E Practice 7: Engaging in argument from evidence
ENGAGING IN ARGUMENT FROM EVIDENCE
Increasing sophistication
Grades K-2
Make a claim and
use evidence
Grades 3-5
Middle School
Construct and
support scientific
arguments drawing
on evidence, data,
or a model.
Consider other
ideas.
Construct and
present oral and
written arguments
supported by
empirical evidence
and reasoning to
support or refute an
explanation for a
phenomenon.
High School
Construct a
counter-argument
that is based on
data and evidence
that challenges
another proposed
argument.
Joe Krajcik, NSTA Webinar: Preparing for the Next Generation Science Standards – Engaging in Argument from Evidence
Details in Appendix F – Science and Engineering Practices in the NGSS, p. 13
10 min break
BENEFITS OF ARGUMENTATION FROM EVIDENCE
How does engaging in argument from evidence
help students?
PRODUCTIVE TALK
Fourth Graders Discussing
What makes the water level rise:
weight or volume?
The Inquiry Project - http://inquiryproject.terc.edu/
DISCUSSION
How did the teacher set up the classroom for
productive talk?
How did the students engage in argumentation from
evidence?
How did we set up the classroom for your activity to
engage in productive talk?
How does productive talk help visualize the linkage
between CCSS ELA and the NGSS?
LEVERAGING THE ELA COMMON CORE
● Speaking and Listening – 2 domains
■ comprehension and collaboration (SL.1-SL.3)
■ presentation of knowledge and ideas (SL.4-SL.6)
conversation leads to building skills in reading and
writing – speaking and listening serve as the foundation
for reading and writing to happen as habits of mind
LEVERAGING THE ELA COMMON CORE
active learning involves the students being engaged
in conversation
How can we
leverage speaking
and listening skills in
the science
classroom?
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING PRACTICES
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering)
Developing and using models
Planning and carrying out investigations
Analyzing and interpreting data
Using mathematics and computational thinking
Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for
engineering)
7. Engaging in argument from evidence
8. Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information
Which of the science and engineering practices can be used to
leverage the ELA Common Core?
CONNECTIONS TO THE COMMON CORE
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DISCIPLINARY CORE IDEAS
Physical Science
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Matter and its interactions
Motion and stability:Forces and interactions
Energy
Waves and their applications in technologies for
information transfer
Life Science
•
•
•
•
From molecules to organisms: structures and
processes
Ecosystems: interactions, energy, and dynamics
Heredity: inheritance and variation of traits
Biological evolution: unity and diversity
Earth and Space Science
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Earth’s place in the universe
Earth’s systems
Earth and human activity
Disciplinary Core Ideas:
1. Have broad importance across multiple sciences or
engineering disciplines or be a key organizing
principle of a single discipline.
2. Provide a key tool for understanding or investigating
more complex ideas and solving problems.
3. Relate to the interests and life experiences of
students or be connected to societal or personal
concerns that require scientific or technological
knowledge.
4. Be teachable and learnable over multiple grades at
increasing levels of depth and sophistication. That is,
the idea can be made accessible to younger students
but is broad enough to sustain continued investigation
over years.
MIDDLE SCHOOL DISCIPLINARY CORE IDEAS (DCI)
Physical Science (discipline)
• Matter and its interactions (DCI)
● Structure and Properties of Matter (sub-idea)
● Chemical Reactions (sub-idea)
• Motion and stability:Forces and interactions (DCI)
● Forces and Motion (sub-idea)
● Types of Interactions (sub-idea)
• Energy (DCI)
● Definitions of energy (sub-idea)
● Conservation of energy and energy transfer (sub-idea)
● Relationship between energy and forces (sub-idea)
● Energy in chemical process and everyday life (sub-idea)
• Waves and their applications in technologies for information transfer (DCI)
● Wave properties (sub-idea)
● Electromagnetic radiation (sub-idea)
● Information technologies and instrumentation (sub-idea)
PERFORMANCE EXPECTATIONS
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Cannot be completed in a single lesson
Is an endpoint or goal in the learning process
Performance expectations combine practices, core
ideas, and crosscutting concepts into a single
statement of what is to be assessed.
Performance expectations are NOT instructional
strategies or objectives for a lesson.
Which PE could this lesson inform and why?
45 minutes
TALK MOVES
Mathematical
Discussion
The Teaching Channel: Improving Participation with Talk Moves
MATHEMATICS
In Science: mathematics represents variables
In Engineering: mathematics used to improve design
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING PRACTICES
1. Asking questions (for science) and defining problems
(for engineering)
2. Developing and using models
3. Planning and carrying out investigations
4. Analyzing and interpreting data
5. Using mathematics and computational thinking
6. Constructing explanations (for science) and designing
solutions (for engineering)
7. Engaging in argument from evidence
8. Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information
MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTATIONAL THINKING
Mathematics
Quantities
and Units
Mathematical
Relationships
Computational
Thinking
Mathematical
Models
Simulations
COMPUTATIONAL THINKING
In science:
● using computers to perform calculations
● way of using computers to help us model
and understand the world
● manipulation and analysis of big data
In engineering:
● simulations
S&E Practice 5: Mathematical & Computational Thinking
How would you describe the
progression from K to 12?
DEVELOPING AND USING MODELS
● A scientific model is an abstract, simplified representation of a system that
makes its most important features explicit and visible.
● Models are external representations of mental (internal) concepts.
Scientific modeling:
● Developing a model
● Evaluating a model
● Revising a model
● Using a model to illustrate, predict, or explain
ANALOGY MAPS
An analogy map is a tool to help students to better understand the parts of the
model that they are using and how these parts relate to the world.
An analogy map describes:
● Each part or feature of the model which includes objects and processes.
● The features of the real world that it represents.
Ask students to critique the model:
● What does the model represent?
● What does the model NOT represent?
● Evaluating the uses for which the model might be more or less well suited.
ACTIVITY
Natural Selection PhET
NATURAL SELECTION ANALOGY MAP
Feature of the model
Feature of the real world
bunnies
wolves
time until next
generation
add a friend button
population chart
is/are
like...
because...
REFLECTION
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East-West: E – excites you; W – worries you
West
East
RESOURCES
● Next Generation Science Standards - http://www.nextgenscience.org/nextgeneration-science-standards
● NSTA resources for NGSS - http://ngss.nsta.org/nsta-products-andservices/
● Math CCSS - http://www.corestandards.org/Math/
● ELA CCSS - http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/
● The Inquiry Project - http://inquiryproject.terc.edu/
● The Teaching Channel - https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos
● Zemelman, S. Daniels, H. & Hyde, A. (2005). 3rd ed. Best practice:
Today’s standards for tacheing and learning in America’s schools.
Portsmoutn, NH: Heinemann.
RESOURCES
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Framework Chapter 3: Dimension 1: Scientific and Engineering Practices
http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=13165#
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Appendix F – Science and Engineering Practices in the NGSS
http://www.nextgenscience.org/sites/ngss/files/Appendix%20F%20%20Science%20and%20Engineering
%20Practices%20in%20the%20NGSS%20-%20FINAL%20060513.pdf
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Appendix I – Engineering Design in NGSS
http://www.nextgenscience.org/sites/ngss/files/Appendix%20I%20%20Engineering%20Design%20in%20NGSS%20-%20FINAL_V2.pdf
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Brian Reiser, NSTA Webinar: Preparing for the Next Generation Science Standards—Asking Questions
and Defining Problems
http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NGSS/webseminar5.aspx
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Joe Krajcik, NSTA Webinar: Preparing for the Next Generation Science Standards – Engaging in
Argument from Evidence
http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NGSS/webseminar11.aspx
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Sarah Michaels, NSTA Webinar: Connections Between Practices in NGSS, Common Core Math and
Common Core ELA
http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NGSS/files/ConnectionsBetweenPracticesin
NGSSCommonCoreMathandCommonCoreELA_2-12-2013.pdf
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Mariel Milano, NSTA Webinar: Engineering Practices in the NGSS
http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NGSS/files/EngineeringPracticesintheNextG
enerationScienceStandards_1-15-2013.pdf
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RESOURCES
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Venn Diagram for Common Core and Science and Engineering Practices - Tina Cheuk ell.stanford.edu
http://www.ode.state.or.us/opportunities/grants/nclb/title_iii/venndiagram-commoncore-framework.pdf
Common Core State Standards http://www.corestandards.org/
Next Generation Science Standards http://www.nextgenscience.org/next-generation-science-standards
The Inquiry Project – resources for productive talk http://inquiryproject.terc.edu/
Mehalik, Doppelt, and Schunn, 2008
http://www.lrdc.pitt.edu/schunn/research/papers/MehaliketalJEE2008.pdf
Margaret Heffernan Ted Talk Dare to Disagree
http://www.ted.com/talks/margaret_heffernan_dare_to_disagree.html?quote=1811
Stuart Firestein Ted Talk The Pursuit of Ignorance
http://www.ted.com/talks/stuart_firestein_the_pursuit_of_ignorance.html
The Toulmin Model of Argumentation http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D-YPPQztuOY
Practice 7 – Engaging in Argument from Evidence http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9RJeVY0-WrA
Preparing for NGSS Engaging in Argument from Evidence podcast
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ozn1YUUcqCU
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