Caregiving Routines as Curriculum - The Program for Infant/Toddler

Report
Infant & Toddler Group Care
Caregiving Routines as
Curriculum
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Learning Objectives
Participants will be able to:
• Explain how caregiving routines such as feeding,
diapering and napping are important opportunities to
form close, caring relationships with each infant.
• Demonstrate how routines are learning opportunities
for the child, and as such, should be carried out at the
child’s pace, allowing the child to participate fully and
make choices.
• Employ caregiving strategies that are consistent with
the caregiving techniques that the family uses at
home.
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Caregiving Routines Are the Heart of
Quality Care
Care teachers need to use feeding, napping,
diapering, and toilet routines as
opportunities to build close, caring
relationships with each child.
If routines are done with sensitivity, the care
teacher can satisfy the baby’s need for
attention, tactile stimulation, interactions,
and attachment.
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Activity: Jigsaw Reading
• Look at the handout: Introduction to A Guide to Routines
(Second Edition).
• Read your assigned section and identify key concepts
in your section.
• Share with the group the key concepts/highlights of your
section.
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Dyad discussion:
• Why are routines
important?
• How do they
impact the
children?
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The Impact of Routines
• Routines provide an opportunity to build
a relationship with each child. If carried
out in a manner consistent with how
routines are done at home, these
routines build a bridge between home
care and center/family child care.
• How routines are approached helps set
the emotional tone of the program.
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The Impact of Routines (cont’d)
• If routines are done in a consistent manner, they
establish predictability and give the children a sense
of control by letting them know what comes next.
• All routines need to be done with consideration to
health and safety issues for children and adults.
• Routines provide opportunities for the adults to
enhance the infants’ development in all domains.
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It’s Not Just Routine: Feeding
It’s Not Just Routine: Feeding, Diapering, and Napping
Infants and Toddlers (Second Edition), 2000
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Reflect: Use mealtime to deepen
connections with children
Think about your last meal with the children:
• How much time did you sit with the children?
• How much did you talk?
• How much did you listen?
• How many times did you get up to get something?
• How much time did you model social interaction and
eating?
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What raised questions for you in the
“Feeding” clip?
Health and Safety:
Relationships and
Learning:
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It’s Not Just Routine: Diapering
It’s Not Just Routine: Feeding, Diapering, and Napping
Infants and Toddlers (Second Edition), 2000
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How closely does your diapering
procedure follow what was shown in
the diapering clip?
• Discuss in a small group.
• Report to the large group.
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It’s Not Just Routine: Napping
It’s Not Just Routine: Feeding, Diapering, and Napping
Infants and Toddlers (Second Edition), 2000
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What are Your Biggest Challenges
with Napping?
Challenges:
Solutions:
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Cultural Continuity of Routines
What steps does your
program take to ensure
that routines are carried
out in a manner similar
to each child’s home
care?
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Review the Learning Objectives
Participants will be able to:
• Explain how caregiving routines such as feeding,
diapering and napping are important opportunities to
form close, caring relationships with each infant.
• Demonstrate how routines are learning opportunities
for the child, and as such, should be carried out at the
child’s pace, allowing the child to participate fully and
make choices.
• Employ caregiving strategies that are consistent with
the caregiving techniques that the family uses at
home.
WestEd.org

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