Everyday Use

Report
Monday, December 8
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Good Monday Morning!
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Movie
Literary Term Presentations
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For tomorrow: Read Everyday Use by Alice Walker.
Page 1226. Point of View assignment:
1. KNOW—don’t write.Whose point of view is the story
told?
2. Choose a different character.Write one page in her/his
voice telling that side of the story.
3. Be ready to discuss the story AND how the point of
view is important in this story.
Tuesday, December 9
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Good Morning!
Upcoming schedule
Finish last moments of Daisy Miller movie.
Literary term presentations
Everyday Use by Alice Walker
◦ First—question 1: Should Mama have given Dee the quilts she
wanted? Yes? No? Textual evidence to support your argument.
◦ Second—voice: Why is mother a good choice for this story? Think
about your own home…
◦ Homework (Journal): Respond to this prompt: Think about the
objects in your home. Do you have any that have been passed down
from other family members? If you were to move away to live on your
own, which objects would you want to take with you? Why? Would your
family let you take it? Explain.
Schedule through Dec 23
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Tuesday: Everyday Use--basics
Block: Everyday Use—irony, critical lenses
Friday: Everyday Use—critical lenses
Monday-Friday, Dec 15-19: A Good Man is
Hard to Find, page 1211
Monday & Tuesday, Dec 22 & 23: Poetry
Read over break: The Dead, page 162,
which despite it’s morbid name is actually
about a holiday party (journal instructions
to come).
Block, December 11. Oh my so
much to discuss…
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Good Morning!
Books to read over break?
◦ The Dead (required—within the big book)
◦ Invisible Man
◦ Ceremony
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Literary Term Presentations
Everyday Use: POINT OF VIEW assignment. Read, share, turn
in. Then, What is your item of value?
Isn’t it ironic… finally
Everyday Use: IRONY & OTHER LITERARY TECHNIQUES
Finish for tomorrow
Everyday Use: THINKING LENSES
Friday, December 12
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Good Morning!
◦ Essays
◦ Literary Term presentation (2)
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Everyday Use
◦ Literary techniques
◦ thinking lenses
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Homework for Monday: Read A Good
Man is Hard to Find, page 1211.
Complete guided reading notes (next
slide).
◦ Flannery O’Connor—1955, writing described
as Southern Gothic…life after the civil war,
grotesque realism, true stereotypes of
people—white, black, poor, southern belle,
religious and racial divisions.
◦ Friday Dancing Music
The Brainstorm
Chanhassen’s new
literary magazine, is
looking for student
writers and artists!
Submit your
• Short stories
• Poems
• Songs
• Drawings
• Photographs
• Paintings
[email protected]
mail.com
Monday, December 15
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Good Morning!
Literary Term Presentations
A Good Man is Hard to Find
◦ Initial thoughts?
◦ Go through the notes you took.
◦ Choose any of the Questions for Discussion at your
pods
◦ How does the Grandmother’s reasoning with
The Misfit change as time goes on? Why?
Thesis statement.
◦ Homework for tomorrow: Read the story again. Be
prepared to discuss Questions on Style & Structure
A Good Man is Hard to Find
Guided Reading: As you read, jot down notes on the following:
1.
Exaggeration
2.
Subtle forms of violence
3.
Epiphanies, big and small
4.
Foreshadowing
5.
References to slavery or racism
6.
References to gentility
7.
References to the Seven Deadly Sins
Tuesday, December 16
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Good Morning!
Literary Term Presentations
A Good Man is Hard to Find
◦ Quotes
◦ Homework: Read Flannery O’Connor’s “Some
Aspects of the Grotesque in Southern Literature” and
“Milledgeville: Flannery O’Connor and Alice Walker”
◦ Highlight (underline?) points that you think are
“true” or important about life or about writing.
(NOT facts about the authors). Be ready to
discuss your favorite.
Block, December 18
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Good Morning! Literary Term presentations.
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Next literary term quiz is January 8
Please take our the southern literature reading.
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What did you choose?
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At your pod, discuss 2 or 3 as they relate to Everyday Use and A Good Man is Hard to Find.
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Be ready to share
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Thinking Critical Lenses. Overview. Determine which story you’d like to discuss (Everyday Use or
a Good Man is Hard to Find). Work with someone who wants to discuss the same story and apply
each lens to the story.
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If time, an AP poem treasure hunt. On a sad poem about death. 
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Homework for Friday: Read A Rose For Emily by William Faulkner, pages 657-663.
Homework for Monday: Choose one of the Exploring the Text or Suggestions for Writing
questions about one of the three stories: Everyday Use (1232), A Good Man is Hard to Find (1225),
or A Rose for Emily (664). Or, show how you applied one of the lenses to one of the story. Submit
to turnitin.com, as you did for Daisy Miller. The goal of this assignment is to think about the
literature deeply. If you do any reading/research on the subject, you MUST cite your source.
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Monday, December 22
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Good Morning!
Literary Term presentations
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A Rose for Emily
◦ Discussion Questions
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Will you be absent tomorrow? Please take an Emily
Dickinson poem study. We’ll be completing it in class
tomorrow.
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Read over break: The Dead, page 162, which despite
it’s morbid name is actually about a holiday party. As
you read, journal about each character.
New Seats (find your people &
choose any pod):
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Alia, Dominic, Conner & Elise
Tyler H, Emily H, Emily J & Tyler K
Liz, Alyssa, Eric & Jack
Eileen, Naomi, Monica & Dane
Daniel, Haley, Jackie & Jenna
Bailey, Claire, Sheridan & Hayley
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Get to know each other—share favorite &
worst holiday food or experience.
January 5, 2015
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Welcome Back…The year of your graduation!
Looking Ahead…
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Literary Term Test: January 8
In-Class Essay on The Dead: January 14
Final Time—Peer Review of essay and socratic seminar
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Poetry Study—January 20-30.
Read Invisible Man by February 2. Select ONE quote from each chapter that stands out to you as. Write a brief
explanation of its importance.
Today
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Literary Term Presentation
The Dead comments
James Joyce video
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HOMEWORK: Read & Annotate Eveline by James Joyce.
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As you read, consider these questions and try to find textual evidence that help answer the questions.
Who is Eveline? What do you imagine her to be like? What is important for us to know about Eveline? Do you “like” her?
How many other characters are there? Are they really there?
Where is Eveline?
What is she doing?
What does she remember? What are the flashbacks?
Pay attention to the temporal words (words that relate to time)…even now, when, but latterly, and now
Should Eveline go with Frank? What would let her go? What would stop her?
Does Eveline need approval from someone or God to go?
Does she escape? What would she be escaping from? What is the opposite of escape?
James Joyce is known for writing characters who experience an epiphany. Does Eveline?
James Joyce said he writes with scrupulous meanness. What does that mean to you? How does he do it?
James Joyce said his writing examines the failures of public life—social, religious, cultural and political systems.
Choose a pod to sit at based on
your interest in Eveline…
This might not be where your best friend
is!
1. Characters
2. Nostalgia
3. Senses—Sight, Sounds, etc.
4. The problem(s)
5. Escape…or not
6. Expectations: Social, religious, cultural,
political
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January 6, 2015
Eveline
 Read out loud. Listen!
 At your pods, discuss indepth in 3 ways: literal,
interpretive, experiencereader-response.
1. Characters
2. Nostalgia
3. Senses
4. The problem(s)
5. Escape
6. Public Life-Expectations:
Social, religious, cultural,
political
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Looking Ahead…
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Literary Term Test: January 8
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In-Class Essay on The Dead: January 14
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Final Time—Peer Review of essay and socratic seminar
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Poetry Study—January 20-30.
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Read Invisible Man by February 2. Select ONE quote from
each chapter that stands out to you as. Write a brief
explanation of its importance.
Literal: Factual from the text. Leads to
an accurate and complete summary of
the text.
Interpretive-Inferential: Require
analyzing or interpreting parts of the
text. What do you infer? What do you
read between the lines? Leads to
understanding the text.
Experiential-Reader Response:
Connect your experiences with the text.
Leads to deeper appreciation of the text.
Thursday, January 8
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Good Morning!
10 minutes—review your literary terms
Literary Term Quiz #3
◦ When finished & waiting…read The Dead
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The Dead quotes
◦ Read your quote. Discuss with your table:
 What it means
 Any literary “coolness” about it—think of your
literary terms. How does the writing help us
understand or appreciate the quote?
 How does this quote help us understand the
meaning of the work as a whole?
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Close Reading
Partner Work: Close Reading
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A—Complete your study by doing the following:
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Peruse the story to find a “rich” paragraph—one that has the meaning,
vocabulary, symbols, sentence structure, etc. to help us understand
something in the story.
Read it multiple times, with pen and paper in hand.
First: Determine general meaning. What’s going on? How do I know?
Second: Study the author’s choices…diction (denotation/connotation),
syntax, similes, metaphors, literary devices (know your terms!), tone (use
your tone worksheet). How do the author’s choices help me understand or
appreciate something in this part of the text (that perhaps I didn’t notice
the first time through)?
Third: Consider thematic, big picture meaning. Are there connections to
other texts? Other characters? How does this reading help us understand
the human condition?
B—Create questions for another partnership to study your
paragraph.
C—Groups of 4 get together to discuss both paragraphs.

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