PowerPoint file Social and Emotional Learning

Report
Supporting Social and Emotional
Learning (SEL): Teachers’ Matter
Kimberly A. Schonert-Reichl, Ph.D.
University of British Columbia
Learning Forward and DLC
May 17, 2012
1
In referring to important characteristics in school
culture . . . “among the most salient are the
quality of relationships among students, the
quality of students relationships to teachers and
their relationship with the school.” (HigginsD’Alessandro & Sadh, 1997, p. 556)
CASEL Heuristic Framework
Healthy
Relationships
Effective SEL
Implementation
Self-Awareness
Responsible
SelfCASEL
Management Five Core DomainsDecision- Making
Effective
Classroom
Management
of S-E Competence
Social Awareness Relationship Skills
Instructional
Support
Academic,
Achievement,
Behavioral, and
Emotional Health
School & Community Context; District, State & Federal Policy
Social and Emotional Competencies
Classroom Context: Climate and Interactions
Teacher Social and Emotional Competence & Pedagogical Skills
The Prosocial Classroom:
A Model of Teacher Social and Emotional Competence and Classroom and
Child Outcomes
Healthy
Teacher/Student
Relationships
Teachers’ Social &
Emotional Skills &
Well Being
Effective
classroom
management
skills
Healthy
Classroom
Climate
Student
Social, emotional
& academic
outcomes
Effective SEL
implementation
School/Community Context Factors
Jennings & Greenberg, 2009
The Burnout Cascade
Emotional Exhaustion
De-personalization
Lack of Accomplishment
50% leave within first 5 years of teaching (NEA, 2006)
Depression and stress
disorders at work account for more than
30% of all disability recorded at major
Canadian corporations (2002)
• Evidence supports the need for specialized
professional development that promotes
teachers’ social and emotional competence (SEC)
and well-being to improve teachers’ emotional
resilience and prevent emotional stress, thus
reducing burnout and attrition and improving
teachers’ capacity to provide well organized and
instructionally and emotionally supportive
classrooms, especially in high risk settings
(Jennings & Greenberg, 2009).
Supporting Teachers
• Enhance regulatory processes that buffer
against psychological distress
• Promote flexibility and self-reflection
• Overcome the tendency to make automatic,
reactive appraisals of student behavior that
contribute to emotional exhaustion
• Improve SEL program implementation quality
SMART Only:
Positive Effects on Teaching
• Made me more compassionate and kinder to
little kids.
• More encouraging [to students]; before wasn’t
aware of present moment.
• Try to think and realize what I need to do and
pick one goal and accomplish that in the
classroom.
14
SMART Only
• I have noticed if I’m calm, my students are also
calm. If students are really hyper, I just ask
them to take 5 deep breaths.
• Students tend to be a lot calmer.
• Before I was more stressed; now, I deal with it
and slow down; it impacts how the kids
respond.
15
• Cultivating
• Awareness
• Resilience
• Education
CARE for Teachers
• 30 Contact Hours over 4 weeks + booster
• Emotion awareness
– Didactic lessons on nature of emotion
– Emotions in relation to teaching & learning
– Experiential exercises to promote emotional awareness
• Mindfulness Practice
• Empathy & Compassion for self and other
– Caring practice
– Mindful listening exercises
• Applications of these to teaching through
discussion and role plays
Sense of Self-Efficacy
7.3
7.2
7.1
7
6.9
Treatment
6.8
6.7
Control
6.6
6.5
6.4
6.3
Pre
Post
General Hurry
3.65
3.6
3.55
3.5
Treatment
3.45
Control
3.4
3.35
3.3
3.25
Pre
Post
Personal Accomplishment
4.85
4.8
4.75
4.7
4.65
Treatment
4.6
4.55
Control
4.5
4.45
4.4
4.35
Pre
Post
Daily Physical Symptoms
25
20
15
Treatment
10
Control
5
0
Pre
Post
Self-Regulation/De-centering
“I’m much more calm. Even when I’m at home,
drinking coffee, my mind’s not racing in a
thousand different places, I’m just liking my
coffee. I’ve learned how to just take things for
what they are and not keep everything on my
shoulders all the time. And because I’m not
doing that anymore, that allows me to treat
my kids better and address their needs better
and try and teach them to be that way
through my example.”
Teacher Education
Programs at UBC
Teacher Education Programs at UBC
Program Options
Bachelor of Education Program Options
• Elementary 12-Month Program
• Elementary 2-Year Program
• Middle Years Program
• Secondary 12-Month Program
• Secondary – Dual Degree: Bachelor of Science (Bsc) and Bachelor
of Education (Bed)
Native Indian Teacher Education Program (NITEP)
Teacher Education Programs at UBC
Elementary Cohort Options (Cont’d)
UBC Teacher Ed. Program
Arts-Based
Community of Inquiry in Teacher Education (CITE)
French Specialist
French Language and Global Studies (FLAGS) Generalist
Generalist
Elementary Cohort Generalist - Intermediate
Options for 12KG and Primary
Month Program
Problem-Based Learning (PBL)
Social and Emotional Learning (SEL)
Teaching English Language Learners (TELL) – July Start
Self-Regulated Learning (SRL)
Teaching from the Heart – July Start
Fostering Resilience in Students:
The Mindset of Teachers
“The assumptions educators
possess about themselves,
their role as teachers, and
their students’ capabilities
play a significant role in
determining expectations,
teaching practices, and
ultimately student happiness
and success.” (p. 1)
Brook s& Goldstein (2008). Canadian Journal of School
Psychology
2648
Fostering Resilience in Students:
The Mindset of Teachers (Cont’d)
The Mindset of Effective Educators
2749
Brook s& Goldstein (2008). Canadian Journal of School
Looking Ahead
Implications for Practice
Future Directions

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