Dundalk Marine Terminal

Report
MTBMA - Transportation Program
Jim Dwyer
Maryland Port Administration
Nov. 20, 2013
1
The City of Baltimore has always
had a great maritime history, due to
its inland location.
Washington, DC
2
The Port of Baltimore is a diverse group
of Private and Public terminals handling a
variety of bulk & general cargoes.
Baltimore
Forest Products
Forest Products
Sugar
Salt &
Containers
Fertilizers
Coal &
Iron Ore
Autos
Farming Mining
Construction
3
5
The Port has global reach, connecting
many suppliers and markets worldwide.
POB’s International Cargo in 2012 was 36.7 Million Tons.
16.0
3.6
7.2
0.6
10.4
1.1
5.3
0.3
POB Tons (Millions)
Imports = Red (12.9m Tons)
Exports = Blue (23.8m Tons)
4
The Port of Baltimore’s foreign tonnage has
recovered from the economic recession.
MPA set record in 2012 for general cargo tonnage.
Port of Baltimore Total Foreign Cargo & MPA General Cargo, 2003 – 2012
40.0
37.8
35.0
31.8
32.4
33.0
30.6
30.0
Tons (Millions)
25.0
24.7
36.7
32.8
30.8
POB Total Foreign Cargo
22.4
20.0
15.0
10.0
7.2
7.7
8.7
9.0
2007
2008
8.6
7.3
8.2
2009
2010
8.9
9.6
MPA General Cargo
5.0
0.0
2003
8.1
2004
2005
2006
2011
2012
5
Coal Exports (tons)
(20 million)
20,000,000
18,000,000
16,000,000
14,000,000
12,000,000
10,000,000
8,000,000
6,000,000
4,000,000
2,000,000
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
Coal export tonnage in 2012 set a new record for the POB. Baltimore
is the 2nd largest coal export port behind Norfolk / Newport News. 6
Iron Ore Imports (tons)
(5 million)
5,000,000
4,500,000
4,000,000
3,500,000
Severstal imported steel slabs for
approximately 6 months in 2009
3,000,000
2,500,000
2,000,000
1,500,000
1,000,000
500,000
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
Iron ore imports are expected to decrease. Sparrows Point is
closed, but some ore can be railed to the Ohio Valley by CSX.
7
Salt Imports (tons)
(2 million)
2,000,000
1,800,000
1,600,000
1,400,000
1,200,000
1,000,000
800,000
600,000
400,000
200,000
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2010 salt import levels increased dramatically after “Snowmageddon
8
Winter”. Salt imports fell in 2012 after a mild winter.
Gypsum Imports (tons)
(2 million)
2,000,000
1,800,000
1,600,000
1,400,000
1,200,000
1,000,000
800,000
600,000
400,000
200,000
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
Gypsum imports continue to fall since the housing bubble popped in
2007. Baltimore still ranks as the largest port for gypsum imports.9
Sugar Imports (tons)
(1 million)
1,000,000
900,000
800,000
700,000
600,000
500,000
400,000
300,000
200,000
100,000
-
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
Baltimore is the largest port for imported sugar in the U.S.A.
10
MPA had steady cargo growth before the
Recession, and set a new record in 2012,
surpassing the prior record in 2008.
(10 million) MPA General Cargo Tonnage, 2003 - 2012
10,000
9,000
8,000
7,000
Tons (1,000)
6,000
5,000
4,000
3,000
2,000
1,000
0
RoRo
Forest P.
Steel/BB
Autos
Containers
2003
445
1,198
339
522
4,660
2004
682
1,177
403
516
4,888
2005
781
1,056
381
496
5,368
2006
808
1,100
443
515
5,690
2007
833
1,144
380
684
5,686
2008
969
1,169
311
699
5,814
2009
598
844
146
493
5,246
2010
623
933
211
735
5,648
2011
939
913
329
829
5,877
2012
1,092
835
389
982
6,297
Total
7,164
7,666
8,082
8,556
8,727
8,962
7,327
8,150
8,887
9,595
11
The Port’s Cruise business increased with the
new terminal adjacent to I-95, and stabilized at
about 100 Cruises per year.
120
Cruises
Port Calls
7
100
7
4
80
60
10
81
40
59
4
2
4
2
28
28
29
27
2005
2006
2007
2008
20
105
100
2011
2012
90
0
2004
2009
2010
12
Summary: Port of Baltimore remains healthy,
and is a nationally significant port.
 Ranks #1 in Autos and Roll-on Roll-off Heavy Equipment.
 Ranks #1 in imported: Sugar, Gypsum, Aluminum and
Forest products.
 Ranks #2 in: exported Coal; imported Iron Ore.
 Ranks #9 in the U.S. in the value of foreign cargo ($54B).
 Ranks #11 in the U.S. in foreign cargo tonnage (36.7M).
 The Port generates over 40,000 jobs:
• 14,600 direct, 14,500 induced, 10,900 indirect jobs,
• $3.0 billion in wages and salaries,
• $304 million in state and local tax revenues annually .
13
MPA
Marine
Terminals
Dundalk
Marine
Terminal
Upcoming
Capital
Projects
Fairfield &
Masonville
14
Dundalk Berth 4; $24 Million, Construction bids were recently received.
This berth was originally built in the early 1960s, and its bulkhead dates back to
the 1930s when this area was Harbor Airport.
15
DMT Berth 4:
The bulkhead at Harbor Field Airport
was constructed in the 1930s.
This 356 acre facility eventually
became DMT.
After the MPA was established in
1956, it started berth development
and phased expansion at DMT.
Wharfs were added in 1960 to
create Berths 2 through 6.
Berth 1 was added in 1966.
1960
(Hangar was used for cargo storage
and M&R until demolished in 2005.)
16
TIGER Project Scope ($29.2M):
1.Widen Seagirt Access Channel
2.Fill Ship Basin & Develop Terminal
3.Extend Rail to Fairfield and new Berth
($10M is USDOT Grant)
17
The Fairfield Ship Basin is physically and functionally
obsolete - no benefit to replacing the bulkheads filling the site will provide 7.5 acres for cargo storage.
Wet Basin 1945
Wet Basin
2013
18
Rail access will be provided to the
new Masonville Vessel Berth, and
the rail yard at Masonville will be
expanded, $3M, Autumn 2014.
Fairfield Ship Basin for cargo storage:
1. Relocate Storm Drain $3M, July 2014
2. Fill Basin $7M, January 2015
3. Site stabilization $1.5M, Summer 2015
4. Redeveloped $3M, Autumn 2015.
Masonville DMCF
Masonville
Terminal
Fairfield
Terminal
Atlantic
Terminal
(Private)
19
Widen Seagirt Marine Terminal’s access channel for the next
generation of container ships: 850,000cy, $12M, Autumn 2014
Fairfield &
Masonville
Dundalk
Marine
Terminal
20
Panama Canal 1914
Panama Canal Today
21
Dundalk Marine Terminal - Demolish and
Redevelop Mestek Site, $5.0M, Summer 2014
22
Dundalk Marine Terminal - Demolish Police Bldg and
Hangar, $.8M, Summer 2014
23
Dundalk Marine Terminal – Replace Parts Storage
Bldg, $3.0M, Summer 2014
24
Dundalk Marine Terminal – Berths 11&12, Deck Beam
Replacement, $5.0M, Autumn 2014.
Dundalk – Utility Pit Rehab, $1.2M, Summer 2014.
25
Cruise Terminal Expansions and Improvements: (carpet,
kiosks, restrooms, canopy, U.S. Customs screening areas,
signage, expand baggage & storage, $6M, Summer 2014.
26
There is insufficient long term capacity for
material dredged from the Harbor for channel
maintenance and improvements.
A new placement
site for material
dredged from the
Harbor is needed
at Coke Point.
27
Coke Point (portion of
Sparrows Point): New
Dredged Material
Placement Facility,
($195M to $360M),
future.
BWI
Shipyard
Coke Point
DMCF
317 acres
28
Port’s Bottom line:
1. Cargo and Cruise forecasts are positive.
2. The Port links Maryland and the Mid-Atlantic region
to the global marketplace.
3. The Port is a large economic engine with a long
record of sustaining a variety of jobs in Maryland.
29
Questions?
Jim Dwyer
Maryland Port Administration
Deputy Director for Planning
[email protected]
(410) 385-4469
30

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