No more dead dogs

Report
MYSTERY NUMBER
NO MORE DEAD DOGS
Cycle 2, Day 1
Agenda

Reading Goal
 As
we read, we will identify examples of figurative
language and explain the comparisons they make.

Today’s Big Question
 What
if you never meant for something to happen, but
it does anyway—are you still responsible for the
outcome?

Team Cooperation Goal: 100% participation
Review where we left off


T-P-S
Review the story to this point with your partner.
Why is point of view important to our story?
Figurative Language
T-P-S

Think aloud of figurative language.
Share a think aloud with your partner.

Look in your student edition for the example below:

The dog looks like a fat sausage with a curly fry tail. It touches
the tip of its very short nose with a pink tongue and makes a
wheezing snort, like a pig with asthma.
The dog’s short coat looks like a painter’s white drop cloth
splattered with black paint. Its long tail whips back and forth
like a windshield wiper.
Figurative Language


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T-P-S
What is compared in the first dog description?
What is being compared in the second dog
description?
Are these comparisons meant to be taken literally?
Why would a writer want to use figurative
language?
Similes, Metaphors, and Idioms T-P-S


What is the difference between similes and
metaphors?
Idioms
Figurative Language
Simile
Metaphor
Idiom
Compares two things
using like or as
Compares two things A colorful expression;
by saying they are the creates an image that
same thing
should not be taken
literally
Exaggeration used to
emphasize, make a
point, or poke fun at
something
The tree branches
tore at his coat like
grasping claws.
George has the heart
of the lion.
I must have called you
a million times last
night!
Can you lend me a
hand?
Hyperbole
Similes, Metaphors, and Idioms T-P-S


What do these idioms mean?
Can you think of some other idioms you hear often?
What do they mean?
Listening Comprehension

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
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

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Listen for figurative language!
Pg 62
T-P-S: Who is the narrator of this section? From
whose point of view will we see story events?
T-P-S: Glancing over this section, how is it
organized?
Listen to pgs 62=66
Listen to think aloud.
T-P-S: Do you see any examples of figurative
language in the first two paragraphs on page 66?
Vocabulary
Word
Demoralized
Agonized
Indispensable
Skulking
Ovation
Menace
Fixated
Savored
Definition
Discouraged or disheartened
Suffered; struggled
Necessary; not able to do without
Lurking; sneaking around
An enthusiastic show of appreciation;
applause
A danger or threat
Intensely focused one’s attention
Enjoyed; appreciated
Partner read: pgs 66 to 73
1.
2.
3.
4.
What conflict does Mr. Fogelman face as the director
of the play? Do you think he has figured out a solution,
or do you think he is headed for more trouble?
Give an example of figurative language used in the
text. What is being compared? Identify what type of
figurative language it is and how you know. (write)
If you were the author, what simile, metaphor, or idiom
would you use to describe Rachel’s feelings about the
pepper trick?
Do you think Wallace was responsible for the team
losing the game? Explain your answer.
Reflection

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# heads
What would have happened if Wallace had stayed
home instead of going to the game?
Do you think he feels responsible for the team’s
losses?
Can you think of some situations where a person
acted with good intentions but things went wrong?
If you never meant for something to happen, but it
does anyway—are you still responsible for the
outcome?
Vocabulary review

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