Critically Reading

Report
Critically Reading
Reading Strategies for difficult text
“Learn how to own a text, rather
than letting the text own you!”
Critical Reading Strategies
1. Number the paragraphs
2. Chunk the text
3. Underline and circle…with a
purpose
4. Left margin: what is the author
saying?
5. Right margin: dig deeper into the
text!
Number the Paragraphs
• Before reading the text take
the time to number the
paragraphs
– Why do we do this? Common
core standards ask students
to be able to cite and refer to
text…ta da! Number the
paragraphs in the margins,
when referencing text, state
paragraph number so
everyone in class knows
where to look and is literally
on the same page/same
paragraph!
Chunk the Text
• This will make it less
overwhelming
– Chunk a few paragraphs
together by drawing a line
between the paragraphs
Look for natural breaks in
the article or text. Did the
author move onto another
sub topic?
• At first, your teacher will
chunk the text for you
• Eventually, you will have
to do it yourself (the
CORRECT way)
Paragraphs 1-3, 4, 5-6 all
chunked together
Underline and Circle…with a purpose!
Instead of underlining and circling “important stuff” you will be asked to
underline one thing and circle another…this will be specific instead of vague
…I estimated that my speed was great enough,
and cut off the drive. It would take me five
minutes to coast the rest of the way, and not
much longer to return with my salvage.
It was at that moment, as I launched
myself out into the abyss, that I knew that
something was horribly wrong.
• Circle unknown words
• Underline examples of
suspenseful lines
Left Margin: What is the Author Saying?
• In the left margin of the article…Students need to
summarize each chunk. Try to keep the summaries
down to one to two sentences.
Right Margin: dig deeper into the text!
• In the right-hand margin include either:
– A power verb to describe what the author is
doing: describing, illustrating, arguing, comparing,
etc.
– Represent info with a picture (doodle time!) to
visually represent the chunk
– Ask questions: sometimes you need something to
be clarified. Be specific in your questioning.
Right Margin: dig deeper into the text!
(Continued)
• A power verb to describe what the author is doing:
describing, illustrating, arguing, comparing, etc.
Right Margin: dig deeper into the text!
(Continued)
• Represent info with a picture (doodle time!) to
visually represent the chunk
“I’ve found it,” I told Control. “It’s someone’s test satellite—coneshaped, four antennas, and what looks like a lens systems in its base.
Probably U.S. Air Force, early nineteen-sixties, judging by the design.
I know they lost track of several when their transmissions failed.
There were quite a few attempts to hit this orbit before they finally
made it.”
Right Margin: dig deeper into the text!
(Continued)
• Ask questions: sometimes you need something to be
clarified. Be specific in your questioning.
– Write questions you have about this chunk in the
right hand margin.
How does this work in class?
• Every student will be provided with an article.
• Re-read ENTIRE article between steps 3-5. By the end
of the assignment, the article should be read at least 4
times.
–
–
–
–
Directions will be included on the top of the article.
Step one: # the paragraphs
Step two: chunk the article
Step three: underline what is indicated in directions and
circle was is indicated in directions
– Step four: Left-margin “summaries” by chunks
– Step five: Right-margin, write what is indicated in
directions

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