Controls and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) - JST

Report
www.jst.umn.edu
Safety Moment Collection
of the Joint Safety Team at the University of Minnesota,
Department of Chemistry and Department of Chemical
Engineering and Material Science.
www.jst.umn.edu
Use these safety
moments as you see fit.
Feel free to adapt a safety moment to meet the specific
needs and time constraints of an audience or occasion;
this may mean using only a portion of the prepared
slides for a topic or including additional
resources for an in-depth discussion.
www.jst.umn.edu
Have a safety moment?
Contribute it to this collection.
Send safety moments to [email protected]
with Safety Moment <topic> in the subject line.
Please put content in the provided template
and cite reliable, credited sources.
Thank you!
Non-PPE Controls
www.jst.umn.edu
www.jst.umn.edu
Hierarchy of Controls
More than PPE
Eliminate/Minimize Hazards
*Using PPE as a
primary hazard
control is a poor
safety practice.
www.jst.umn.edu
http://www.jst.umn.edu/SOP%20resources.html
6
How to Eliminate/Minimize Hazards
How can you eliminate or minimize the identified risks?
Standard methods include:
1. Substitution - Use a less hazardous reagent in place of a
hazardous one
2. Administrative Control - Modify your procedure or
reaction scheme to minimize the risk the hazardous step
3. Personal Protective Equipment* – Use appropriate PPE
*A last resort when other methods fail. Using PPE as a
primary hazard control is considered a poor safety practice.
www.jst.umn.edu
http://science.widener.edu/svb/olcc_safety/papers/benedict.pdf
7
www.jst.umn.edu
Engineering Controls
Redesigning workplaces to
reduce hazards
Control Systems
* Multiple layers to
hazard reduction
www.jst.umn.edu
http://www.jst.umn.edu/SOP%20resources.html
l
Engineering Controls
Include designs or modifications to laboratories,
equipment, ventilation systems, and processes
that reduce exposure -CCOHS
Fume hood
Blast shield
Emergency
override
buttons
blink.ucsd.edu
Workspace design
www.labscape.com
www.jst.umn.edu
www.scrippscollege.edu
www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/hsprograms/hazard_control.html
www.controleurope.com
Chemical Substitutions
To eliminate / minimize hazards
Common Substitutions and
Evaluating a Potential Substitution
Common Chemical Substitutions
Instead of :
Consider:
Benzene
Toluene, Cyclohexane, Ketones
Carbon tetrachloride
1,1,1- trichloroethane or Isopropyl alcohol
Diethyl ether (extractions)
Hexanes
Chromate ion (oxidation)
Hypochlorite ion
Formaldehyde (bio preservation)
Ethanol or commercial product (ex. Formalternate)
Methanol
Ethanol, anhydrous
Mineral oil
Silicon oil
K or Na (reactive group 1 metals)
Ca or Mg
Strong Acid (HCl) / Base (OH-)
Acetic acid / bicarbonate
Benzoyl peroxide (catalyst)
30% Hydrogen peroxide or Lauroyl Peroxide
Chemical Substitution. Health Canada, Environmental and Workplace Health. Accessed 8 Jan 2014.
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/occup-travail/whmis-simdut/substitution-eng.php
Stroud, L.M. Substitution of a more hazardous chemical by a less hazardous chemical. Science and
Safety Consulting Services. Accessed 8 Jan 2014
www.sciencesafetyconsulting.com/pdf/chemical_substitutions.pdf
12
Considering a Potential Substitute
Hazards
Is the replacement less hazardous ?
Read SDS
Ensure one hazard is not exchanged for another.
Effectiveness
Does it meet the process requirements?
Is it likely to work?
Evaluate & Compare
(health, fire, corrosivity, reactivity, etc.)
Control
Measures
Is the new substance adequately controlled by the
existing system? (ventilation, vapor pressure,
Compatibility
Does it interfere or react with other materials or
the equipment?
temperature, flash point, flammability, etc.)
Substitution of Chemicals – Considerations for Selection. Canadian Centre for Occupational
Health and Safety. Updated 1 March 2009. Accessed 8 Jan 2013.
http://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/chemicals/substitution.html
13
More Resources
•
Transitioning to Safer Chemicals. Occupational Safety and Health
Administration. Accessed 8 Jan 2014,
https://www.osha.gov/dsg/safer_chemicals/basics.html
•
IC2 Safer Alternative Assessments. Accessed 8 Jan 2014,
http://www.ic2saferalternatives.org/
•
Chemical Substitution. Health Canada, Environmental and Workplace
Health. Accessed 8 Jan 2014, http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/occuptravail/whmis-simdut/substitution-eng.php
•
Stroud, L.M. Substitution of a more hazardous chemical by a less
hazardous chemical. Science and Safety Consulting Services. Accessed 8
Jan 2014,
www.sciencesafetyconsulting.com/pdf/chemical_substitutions.pdf
14
Administrative Controls
Laboratory policies
to minimize hazards
Administrative Controls
– Written operating procedures (SOPs)
– Training requirements
• Before working in the lab / General
• Specific chemicals or procedures
– Lab policies and practices
• Working alone / buddy system
• Unattended reactions
• Housekeeping standards
– Limiting time exposure to hazards
– Posting signage to identify hazards
Building & Room
Laboratory
Information
Principal Investigator, phone/email
Lab Safety Officer, phone/email
Description
Minimum
PPE Required
Hazards
16
In an emergency, call 911. In non-emergency
situations, contact the LSO or PI.
Classes of
Personal Protective Equipment
(PPE)
www.jst.umn.edu
www.jst.umn.edu
Proper Lab Attire
Proper Lab Attire
• Clothing must cover the arms and legs
– Tights/leggings are not appropriate
– Short sleeves are okay if lab coat is worn
• Loose or draping clothing (i.e. scarves) is unsafe
• Long hair should be tied back
www.jst.umn.edu
19
Proper Lab Attire
• Shoes with traction are preferable
• Steel-toed shoes are required when
transporting heavy equipment
• Socks should cover ankles.
X
www.jst.umn.edu
Prudent Practices in the Laboratory: Handling and Management of Chemical Hazards (2011),
Section 6.c.2.6.2
Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology (BCST)
20
NO X
Shoes
YES √
• Shoes must
cover the
entire foot
• Leather or
synthetic
leather is best
• Thick sole to
protect from
broken glass
Chemical Hygiene Plan, Department of Chemistry. Carleton College. Available at
http://apps.carleton.edu/curricular/chem/safety/. Accessed 28 Jan 2013.
21
www.jst.umn.edu
Gloves: The basics
Best practices for wearing disposable
gloves
Gloves
• Select gloves made of material known to be resistant to permeation
by the substances in use.
– Lab Safety Supply Company provides chemical compatibility guide for gloves at
http://www.labsafety.com/refinfo/ezfacts/EZ166.pdf.
• Check gloves (even new ones) tears or pinholes.
• Select gloves of the correct size and fit
– Too small  uncomfortable and may tear
– Too large  low dexterity
• Remove rings and jewelry that can tear gloves
www.jst.umn.edu
UofM, Department of Environmental Health and Safety.
Bio Basics Fact Sheet: Glove Selection and Use
Gloves
• Replace gloves when
–
–
–
–
Contaminated
Permeated by solvent
Torn
You have been wearing them awhile
• Some gloves, especially lightweight disposables, may be flammable
– Keep hands well away from flames or other high temperature heat sources
• Consider double gloving, if working with
– A highly hazardous compound
– Radioactive materials
– Situations were there is a high potential for spills or splashes
www.jst.umn.edu
UofM, Department of Environmental Health and Safety.
Bio Basics Fact Sheet: Glove Selection and Use
Gloves
• Remove gloves before leaving lab area.
– Remove in a way that avoids skin contact
contaminated glove exterior
• Dispose of gloves in non-hazardous
(normal) trash
– If radioactive chemicals were used,
place in radioactive waste.
www.hsc.wvu.edu/safety/Laboratory-Safety/Personalprotective-Equipment/Hand-Protection
• Wash hands
• Do not attempt to re-use disposable gloves.
– Increased risk for contamination
www.jst.umn.edu
UofM, Department of Environmental Health and Safety.
Bio Basics Fact Sheet: Glove Selection and Use
Gloves
• To prevent the unintentional spread of hazardous substances,
when wearing gloves don’t touch
– Anything used outside the lab
• Doorknobs, personal telephones, pens, etc.
– Your face or clothes
If you are transporting a chemical in the hallway,
only wear a glove on one hand.
• Have a policy (gloves or no gloves) for lab computer use.
– Post your policy on the computer to remind visiting researchers.
www.jst.umn.edu
UofM, Department of Environmental Health and Safety.
Bio Basics Fact Sheet: Glove Selection and Use
www.jst.umn.edu
Gloves: Chemical Compatibility
Glove Comparison Chart
Incidental contact: little or no direct contact with the hazardous material.
Extended contact: handling highly contaminated materials; submerging hands in a chemical
or other hazardous substance; need for physical protection from temperature extremes or
www.jst.umn.edu
sharp/piercing objects
http://www.ehs.berkeley.edu/hs/63-laboratory-safety/94-glove-
28
www.jst.umn.edu
29
www.jst.umn.edu
30
www.jst.umn.edu
31
Water based solution, organic solvents, acids and bases, halogenated hydrocarbons
www.jst.umn.edu
32
Glove Usage
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Wear gloves of a material known to be resistant to permeation by the substances in use.
Look for an expiration date on individual packages of gloves.
Before use, check gloves (even new ones) for physical damage such as tears or pinholes.
Check reusable gloves for previous chemical damage.
Dispose of gloves when they show any sign of leakage or deterioration.
Select gloves of the correct size and fitting.
Some gloves, especially lightweight disposables, may be flammable: keep hands well away
from flames or other high temperature heat sources.
Replace gloves periodically, depending on the frequency of use and their permeation and
degradation characteristics relative to the substances handled.
Remove gloves before handling objects such as doorknobs, telephones, pens, and computer
keyboards.
When removing gloves, do so in a way that avoids skin contact with a possibly
contaminated glove exterior.
Always wash hands after removing gloves.
Dispose of contaminated gloves properly.
Do not attempt to re-use disposable gloves.
www.jst.umn.edu
http://www.dehs.umn.edu/PDFs/gloves.pdf
33
Handling the Heat
• OSHA (U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Safety & Health
Administration)
– Select gloves that provide guarding and insulation
Heat resistant gloves
(attention: never wet the gloves
when you put the autoclaves in water;
water is a heat conductor)
www.jst.umn.edu
34
Prevention and protection
• Read SDS and learn about the temperatures,
then select appropriate PPE and employ
additional controls
Diethyl ether
www.jst.umn.edu
35
www.jst.umn.edu
Types of eye protection
Eye Protection
Overview
Text
Safety Glasses
•Impact resistant (shatter proof) and UV shielding lenses
•Use when splash potential is low to prevent solvent or object from
entering eyes
Splash Goggles
• Seal around the face and are impact resistant
• Use when there is a potential for a splash from a hazardous material
• Can wear over prescription glasses
Face Shield
• Use when working with large volumes of hazardous materials
(solvents or particles).
• Use in conjunction with safety glasses or goggles.
www.jst.umn.edu
Boston Medical Center, EHS and Laboratory Safety Committee. July 2011
http://www.bu.edu/orccommittees/files/2011/07/LabSafe-NL_July.pdf
Eye Protection Options
www.jst.umn.edu
http://cenblog.org/the-safety-zone/2010/06/eyes-in-the-lab/
www.jst.umn.edu
Googles vs. Safety Glasses
Goggles vs. Safety Glasses
www.jst.umn.edu
Photos courtesy of Michaela Roslawski, Sasha Schrandt, Kei Fuchigami (Photographer)
St. Olaf College
The Test
www.jst.umn.edu
Photos courtesy of Michaela Roslawski, Sasha Schrandt, Kei Fuchigami (Photographer)
St. Olaf College
Goggles
www.jst.umn.edu
Photos courtesy of Michaela Roslawski, Sasha Schrandt, Kei Fuchigami (Photographer)
St. Olaf College
The Test
www.jst.umn.edu
Photos courtesy of Michaela Roslawski, Sasha Schrandt, Kei Fuchigami (Photographer)
St. Olaf College
Goggles
www.jst.umn.edu
Photos courtesy of Michaela Roslawski, Sasha Schrandt, Kei Fuchigami (Photographer)
St. Olaf College
Goggles
www.jst.umn.edu
Photos courtesy of Michaela Roslawski, Sasha Schrandt, Kei Fuchigami (Photographer)
St. Olaf College
The Test: Safety Glasses
www.jst.umn.edu
Photos courtesy of Michaela Roslawski, Sasha Schrandt, Kei Fuchigami (Photographer)
St. Olaf College
Safety Glasses
www.jst.umn.edu
Photos courtesy of Michaela Roslawski, Sasha Schrandt, Kei Fuchigami (Photographer)
St. Olaf College
www.jst.umn.edu
Flame Resistant Sleeves
A great alternative to a
flame resistant lab coat
48
Flame Resistant Sleeves
$11.00 per pair vs. ~$100
for a full lab coat
Fits over normal lab coat
sleeve
Protects part of arm most
likely to come in contact
with flammables while
working in the hood
http://workingperson.com/national-safety-apparel-16-9oz-fr-green-sateen-sleeve-sewn-inelastic-s02grrg02.html#details
49
Sleeves
• Cover your arms
• Make sure sleeves don’t
inhibit work
• Be conscious of longer street
clothes sleeves that stick out
of a lab coat
www.jst.umn.edu
http://www.sigmaaldrich.com/labware/safety.html
http://onqor.net/ordering/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=57
www.jst.umn.edu
Respiratory
Protection
Is a respirator needed?
How can you get one?
51
Respiratory hazards
•
Aerosolization during common lab
procedures – e.g., weighing solids for
making solutions – Tris, SDS, Ascorbic
acid, MES hydrate.
•
Harmful/irritating to the eyes and lungs.
PPE
• Gloves, goggles, lab coat. In general read
MSDS before using any chemicals, and
possibly respiratory mask.
Upon exposure
• Eyes : Rinse at the eye shower
• Inhalation: Move to fresh air, seek
medical aid if experiencing discomfort
52
Respiratory Protection Program
• Check the MSDS to determine if a respirator is needed for the
chemicals you are working with.
• If use of a respirator is required, DEHS will provide you with
information to enroll in the University’s Respiratory Protection
Program through the Office of Occupational Health
• Information on the Respiratory Protection Program can be found at:
http://www.ohs.umn.edu/rpp/home.html
• Minimum requirements for the program include filling out a health
survey and a fit test for the type of respirator you will be using
• Additional information is available through the website
www.jst.umn.edu
http:[email protected][email protected][email protected]/documents
/asset/ahc_asset_108552.pdf
www.jst.umn.edu
Lab Coat Material Compatibility
Splash Protection
*All costs estimated from
Amazon.com (2014)
Less flammable
than blends
Stock room
~$20
Splash
barrier
Less susceptible
to acids than
100% cotton
Polyester/
Cotton Blend
100% Cotton
www.jst.umn.edu
Lab Coat Information Table. Columbia University EHS, 2008.
<http://www.ehs.columbia.edu/ppeLabCoatInformationTable.html>.
Laboratory Coat Selection, Use, and Care. MIT EHS, 2013.
<https://ehs.mit.edu/site/sites/default/files/files/LabCoatGuidance.pdf>.
55
Flame Resistance
*All costs estimated from
Amazon.com (2014)
~$40
Less bulky
than Nomex®
fabric
Breathable
Flame resistant
~$100
Recommended
Launder without for pyrophorics
bleach
100% cotton +
Flame Retardant (FR)
Nomex®
www.jst.umn.edu
Lab Coat Information Table. Columbia University EHS, 2008.
<http://www.ehs.columbia.edu/ppeLabCoatInformationTable.html>.
Laboratory Coat Selection, Use, and Care. MIT EHS, 2013.
56
Lab Coat Compatibility
Major Hazard
Protection
Coat Material
Cost*
Special Benefits
Solvent splash
Polyester/Cotton
Blend
~$20
Better splash and
corrosive protection,
cheap
Solvent splash
100% Cotton
~$20
Lower flammability,
cheap
100% Cotton +
Flame Retardant (FR)
~$40
Breathable, flame
resistant (FR)
Nomex IIIA
~$100
Better heat and FR,
recommended for
pyrophorics
Particles contamination,
biological fluid, static
Microbreathe
~$140
Ideal for clean-room
use or static
dissipation
Non-hazardous mess
Polypropylene
~$10
Disposable
Fire
Fire, pyrophorics
www.jst.umn.edu
http://www.ehs.columbia.edu/ppeLabCoatInformationTable.html
https://ehs.mit.edu/site/sites/default/files/files/LabCoatGuidance.pdf
*On Amazon.com
57
www.jst.umn.edu
Acid Aprons
Acid Aprons
Nitrile blend aprons are resistant to acid and base
They should be used when working with
concentrated acid or base, especially when in
large amounts
Aprons are available in the stockroom
Don’t forget your goggles and acid resistant gloves!
www.jst.umn.edu
59
PPE Protocol
www.jst.umn.edu
www.jst.umn.edu
Personal Protective Equipment
Where – and where not – to wear it!
Wear PPE when:
Working in
laboratory spaces
When using a
“gloves on” keyboard
Lab coat is okay to wear when walking from lab to lab, unless is it
known to be contaminated with a particularly hazardous substance.
www.jst.umn.edu
When NOT to wear PPE
Outside
Bathrooms
Offices/ non-lab
spaces
When using
mobile phones
www.jst.umn.edu
When using a “gloves off”
keyboard
When NOT to wear PPE
When quenching your thirst.
Don’t risk ingesting chemicals
and spreading them to drink
containers.
Is a beverage container only
touched with gloves on?
Note: Labs where hazardous
chemicals are used have 6 - 12
air changes per hour.
 Increased thirst
www.jst.umn.edu
64
Transporting Chemicals
• Use secondary
containment
(bucket)
• One gloved
hand, one
ungloved hand
• Carry other
needed PPE if
moving
between labs
www.jst.umn.edu
www.jst.umn.edu
PPE and Chemical Packages
66
Opening Chemical Packages
• PPE required to transport chemicals within and between labs
• Best practice suggests PPE should be worn when opening packages
containing chemicals
– Packaging is form of engineering control
– PPE protects in case that control fails
www.jst.umn.edu
67
www.jst.umn.edu
Lab Coat Laundering System
Importance of a Clean Lab Coat
• Wearing a seriously
soiled lab coat is like
wearing hazardous waste!
• Chemistry department
now offers a FREE lab
coat laundering service
• Monthly service
www.jst.umn.edu
69
How it works
Every 4th Wednesday
• Drop off dirty lab coats to Smith S18
• Make sure your name is written on the pocket (not
collar)
• There will be two hampers:
– Coats that DO have the vendor’s barcode in the collar
– Coats that DO NOT have the vendor’s barcode in the collar.
• Look for a monthly email reminder
Thursday afternoon, 4 weeks later
• Pick up your clean lab coat from Smith S18
www.jst.umn.edu
Available Resources
www.jst.umn.edu
DEHS Contact
Anna Sitek (Englund)
E-mail: [email protected]
Phone: (612) 625-8925
Office W-147 Boynton
Research Safety Specialist assigned to our
department, and newly-created DEHS safety
contact for our entire college.
She will serve as a member of our
department Safety Committee and will work
with the JST.
Feel free to contact her with any questions!
www.jst.umn.edu
JST website
www.jst.umn.edu
www.jst.umn.edu
Dow Safety Academy
http://safety.dow.com/
www.jst.umn.edu
www.jst.umn.edu
7
www.jst.umn.edu
Have a safety moment?
Contribute it to this collection.
Send safety moments to [email protected]
with Safety Moment <topic> in the subject line.
Please put content in the provided template
and cite reliable, credited sources.
Thank you!
www.jst.umn.edu
www.jst.umn.edu
Templates
www.jst.umn.edu
www.jst.umn.edu
Safety Moment Title
www.jst.umn.edu
80
www.jst.umn.edu
www.jst.umn.edu

similar documents