Early Childhood and Family Investment Transition Report

Report
Early Learning Council
BEND, OREGON
SEPTEMBER 21ST, 2012
Early Learning Council Members
•
Pam Curtis, Chair, Deputy Director, Center for Evidence-based Policy, Oregon Health & Sciences University
•
Bobbie Weber, Research Associate, Family Policy Program, College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University
•
Janet Dougherty-Smith, Former Director, Early Childhood Services for Clackamas County Education Service District
•
Norm Smith, President, Ford Family Foundation
•
Dick Alexander, Chairman of Capital Pacific Bank and Board member of the Children's Institute
•
Marlene Yesquen, Attorney, Medford's Black Chapman Webber and Stevens, Medford School District Board Member
•
Teri Thalhofer, RN, Director, North Central Public Health
•
Jim Tierney, Executive Director, Community Action Team
•
Harriet Adair, Regional Administrator, Portland Public Schools
•
Dana Hargunani, Child Health Director, Oregon Health Authority
•
Lynne Saxton, Executive Director, Christie Care-Youth Villages of Oregon
•
Kara Waddell, Administrator, Oregon Child Care Division
•
Dell Ford, Oregon Head Start Collaboration Director
•
Eva Rippeteau, Political Coordinator, Oregon AFSCME
•
Vikki Bishop, Early Childhood Education Program Manager, Confederated Tribes of the Grande Ronde
•
Kim Williams, Director of North Central ESD Early Education
•
Nancy Latini, Deputy Superintendent, Oregon Department of Education
•
Charles McGee, Executive Director and Co-Founder of the Black Parent Initiative
•
Dick Withnell, Founder, Withnell Auto
ELC Charge
1.
Ensure all Children are:
 Ready for Kindergarten
 Ready to Read in 1st Grade
 Reading at Grade-level by end of 1st Grade
2. Integrate and coordinate resources and efforts
In Oregon
 45,000 children born each year
 270,000 ages 0-5
 40% at risk
 Low income
 Children of color
 Families accessing state assistance programs
 $350+ million per year
In Oregon
 Complex education, health and support system
 More than 2 dozen state-sponsored programs
 28,000 non-profit organizations
 Eight state-level coordinating bodies
 Local governance structures
 Uncoordinated and disconnected
 Difficult to navigate
 Lack of outcome accountability
In Oregon
 Underperforming early identification efforts
 Example: 40% of children in foster care on TANF for 2+
months
 Unacceptable results
 36% of children in poverty (30% nationally)
 34th in child health system performance
 40%+ not ready for school
 Bottom quartile of US for reading proficiency after 3rd grade
 High rates of non-completion
The Future: Back to the Vision
Oregon’s Early Learning System
Early identification & risk assessment
2. All children have early learning opportunities
3. Coordinated & integrated support
1.


Use of Family Resource Management
Consistent regional approach
4. Outcome focus

Service contracts

Kindergarten readiness assessment
5. Integrated data system
Oregon’s Early Learning System
6. Consolidate governance structures
7. Parental access and transparency

TQRIS
8. Trained and supported workforce
9. Global Children’s Budget
Local Implementation through Community
Based Coordinators of Early Learning Services
 Communities will submit an application that
demonstrate how they will achieve the outcomes:
 Ensure all Children are:
 Ready for Kindergarten
 Ready to Read in 1st Grade
 Reading at Grade-level by end of 1st Grade
Pam Curtis
ELC Chair
[email protected]
503-494-3264
Jada Rupley
Early Learning Systems
Director
[email protected]
503-373-0071
Duke Shepard
[email protected]
503-373-1558
Heidi McGowan
[email protected]
541-929-7501
Christi Peeples
[email protected]
503-378-6768

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