2012 Shooting Seminar PowerPoint

Report
Biathlon Alberta
Coaching Seminar
2012
Edmonton, June 9, 2012
Who Is Who?
Richard Boruta, Ch.P.C.
 National level athlete (Czechoslovakia)
 HP biathlon coach since 1994
 Czech, Austrian, German, Russian, Canadian systems
 All levels of coaching in Canada (RMR – Olympics 2006)
 BATC Head coach
Who Is Who?
Petr Zidek
 Trail Grooming experience
 Both kids into Canadian Junior National level
 Rifle marksmanship
 Rifle technician / custom stock builder
Who Is Who?
 Rick
 Bryan
 Michael
 Mark
 Greg
 Lori
 Airat
 Davis
 Iari
 Ray
 Sam
 Julia
 Jennifer
 Alan
Athletes performance
– your coaching record
 Meghan Armstrong
 David and Andrew Leoni
 Robin Clegg
 Scott Perras
 Zina Kocher
 Julia Ransom
Interpretation
 Every coach needs to find his or her way of coaching
 It is important to stay up-to-date with your knowledge
 Stay focused on your goals – big picture
 Let your athletes to teach you a lesson
 Learn from others, but do not steer away from your
course!
Shooting technique
 Importance of Prone versus Standing
 Great variety of positions and techniques
 Consistency is the key
 Try to find for everybody as natural position as possible
 Allow enough time to stabilize athlete’s shooting skills
(avoid major changes close to season)
 Always adjust rifle to body and range, don’t try to adjust
body to rifle!
Prone
 Easier (better rifle support, body stability)
 Basics for breathing, aiming, trigger work
Prone
– rifle/body contact points
 Consistency is the key to success!
 Major vs. minor points
Prone

High x Medium x Low position

Sling tension (Men little more than Women)

Left elbow position slightly left from rifle (right handed)

Head straight up

Back aligned, shoulders and hips square to spine

Shooting order (L-R vs. R-L) changes the tension!

Front sight size (2.8 – 3.5)

Trigger hand/ finger position

Sometimes too long stock!

Breathing patterns – shoot in half exhale!
Different prone positions
High
Medium
Low
Standing
 Maximize stance support
 Anatomical grip for left hand
 Rifle above center of gravity (middle of feet)
 Left hand inside the stance
 Proper stock length
 Right elbow in natural position (balance x rifle control)
 Different breathing patterns than in prone
Standing position alignment
Trigger finger position
Trigger work
Correlation between breathing and trigger pull
Final exhale
Follow through
fo
be
ale
xh le
ll e ha
Fu xt in
ne
Release
point
Shot release point
re
Trigger pressure
0%
2.5 sec
1.5 sec
0 sec
3.5 sec
Time
Focus distribution
 Environment, situation, position, trigger, aiming
 Where do you want your athletes to focus their aiming
eye?
 Post vs. circle aperture
 Focus during fine aiming - equal distribution between
sights and trigger
Position vs. Aiming/trigger
Biathlon Shooting
Focus Distribution
Focus on position
Focus
Shot release point
100%
Focus on target + trigger
Time
0%
4- 5 sec
2.5 sec
1.5 sec
0.5 sec
Dry firing
 Important for developing specific strength and muscular
endurance
 Follows and compliments the shooting periodization
 How much is enough?
Shooting evaluation
Different shooting tests
 Precision shooting (10+10, 20+20, 30+30)
 Biathlon shooting (1-shot set-up, 5 across)
French (Bulgarian) test:
 10+10 precision
 2 min drill (P,P,S,S) 10* # of hits+ (80 –time s)
 5x1 shot set-up P/S: time for 5 hits in each position
(160-time P; 150-time S)
Shooting evaluation
 Need to take into account different conditions on different
ranges (indoor, rifle range, biathlon)
 Know your ammunition, sometimes it is not the athlete’s
fault!
 Not always is the best precision shooter also the best
shooter in biathlon, but there needs to be a certain
standards
 Training is designed for practicing different approaches, no
need to be concerned about all the percentages. Focus on
high intensity shooting!
Range Procedure - Prone
Range&
procedure&
–&
PRONE!
Focus!on!breathing,!trigger,!sight!
picture,!target!
Focus!on!wind,!mat!conditions,!
target,!position!!
Focus!on!environment!
(wind,!light,!snow)!
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After&
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On&
carpet:&
Skiing&
in:&
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!
!
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
1. Unhook!sling,!close!
rear!cover!
2. Rifle!on!the!back,!close!
front!cover!
3. Poles!in!hand(s)!
Poles!off!
Front!cover!
Rear!cover!
Bolt!open!
Shooting!point!
selection!
!
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On&
carpet:&
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Skiing&
out:&
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Poles!down,!kneel!!
Rifle!off!
Hand!to!hand!stopper!
Clip!in!(or!exchange)!
Body!position,!sling!
hookJup,!butt!plate!to!
shoulder!
6. Environment!J!sight!
confirmation!
!
1. Get!into!ski!speed!
with!free!skating!or!
using!poles!
2. Poles!on!
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
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Shot&
preparation:&
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7. Natural!alignment!
8. Bolt!closed,!trigger!
preload,!breathing!
patterns!
9. Breath!stopped!J!fine!
aiming!and!trigger!
squeeze!
10. Follow!through!
11. Asses!result,!repeat!6J
7!if!necessary,!or!8!–!
11!if!everything!works!
!!!
!
Check!the!target!(number!
of!misses)!
!
!
!
Range Procedure - Standing
Range&procedure&–&STANDING!
Focus!on!breathing,!trigger,!sight!
picture,!target!
!
!
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Poles!off!
Front!cover!
Rear!cover!
Bolt!open!
Shooting!point!
selection!
!
1. Close!rear!cover!
2. Rifle!on!the!back,!
close!front!cover!
3. Poles!in!hand(s)!
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On&carpet:&
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Skiing&out:&
&
Poles!down!
Feet!alignment!
Rifle!off!
Clip!exchange!
Environment!J!sight!
confirmation!!
6. Butt!plate!to!shoulder,!
tight!body!position!
!
1. Get!into!ski!speed!
with!free!skating!or!
using!poles!
2. Poles!on!
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
&
Shot&preparation:&
&
7. Natural!alignment!
8. Bolt!closed,!trigger!
preload,!breathing!
patterns!
9. Breath!stopped!J!fine!
aiming!and!trigger!
squeeze!
10. Follow!through!
11. Asses!result,!repeat!5J7!
if!necessary,!or!8!–!11!if!
everything!works!!
!
!
Watch!for!obstacles!/!other!
competitors!in!your!way!!
Focus!on!wind,!mat!conditions,!
target,!position!!
Focus!on!environment!
(wind,!light,!snow)!
&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&Before&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&After&
!
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Skiing&in:&
On&carpet:&
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Check!the!target!(number!
of!misses)!
!
!
Support documents
Correction chart
Dry firing targets
Need to be round and proper size!
Shooting periodization
 It is very important to treat shooting training the same
way as physical training!
 There needs to be a general phase (technique /
precision), biathlon specific phase (speed, metal
targets, skis / RS), low intensity and high intensity
overloads as well as rest!
 Planning and evaluation (time, number of shots,
accuracy)
General preparatory
 6-8 weeks, average 5 times a week
 Cover your basics: technique, precision
 Speed drills
 No intensity or easy combo
 In average 1 combo per week
 Dry firing 4-5 x 20-30 min, mostly holding, position setup
Specific Preparatory 1
 8-9 weeks, 1 no intensity session, 4 combos
 Transferring skills into higher intensity workouts
 Biathlon speed shooting with focus on maintaining
accuracy
 Roller ski shooting drills
 Time trials
 Dry firing 4 x 20 min some holding (mostly S), speed for
position set-up, using poles
Competitive Dry Land
 2-3 weeks, shooting 4-5 x per week
 Biathlon specific testing, roller ski races or TT
 Opportunity to rehearse acquired skills, test your taper
 First real picture of actual biathlon performance
 Dry firing 3-4 per week 10 minutes (trigger technique +
set-up speed)
Specific Preparatory 2
 7-8 weeks, 4-5 x per week
 Last opportunity to work on technique / precision
 No more major changes since early October
 Dry land + on-snow training
 Mostly biathlon-specific drills
 Dry firing 4x 20 min
Competitive Period 1
 4-5 x per week, based on competition schedule
 Selection trials, low key races
 Automation of all processes
 Dry firing as needed (4 x 10 min), also 2 hrs before the
race to fire the neuromuscular coordination!
Competitive Period 2
 4-6 x per week, based on the competition schedule
 Low volume (usually 50-70 rounds per session)
Transition Period
 Do not shoot for at least 4 weeks!
 Clean the rifle and do a mechanical check-up.
Short form
shooting periodization
 September – 4 weeks General Preparatory
 October – 4 weeks Specific Preparatory 1 (dry land,
skill stabilization)
 November – 4 weeks Specific Prep. 2 (dry / on snow,
biathlon specific – speed, time trials)
 December / January – 9 weeks Competitive 1
(Selections, low-key races)
 February/ March – 8 weeks Competitive 2 (Nationals)
Discussion about shooting
 Typical errors
 Typical misses (1-7-10)
 Vostok vs. Anchutz
 Air rifles
 Various positions
 Precision shooting standards
 Latest competition trends
Training periodization
Basic Time Table
Biathlon Alberta Training Centre
Season 2012/2013
Season Planner
1
Month/Date:
2
14
April
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
15
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
17
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
18
31
team holidays
June
Training starts
May
19
24
Bike Camp
Penticton / BC
32
36
SNT Testing
Canmore
37
RS Bia Haig Glacier
Canmore
41
Dry Land Biathlon
Park City / UT
46
40
Park City
45
November
49
December
IBU 5 - EST
WC 4 - Oberhof
6
10
March
Month/Date:
WC 7 NOR
1
2
3
4
5
33
Speed / technique
Whistler / BC
BATC
38
Testing Rest week
Canmore
42
IBU Selections
Canmmore
Training camp
9
10
11
12
WC 9 - Khanty
13 14 15 16
WC competition
31
34
35
39
43
44
47
48
IBU 1 SWE
IBU2 NOR
WC#1 - SWE
WJCH / IBU
1
selections
52
WC3 - SLO
3
IBU 6 - RUS
WC 5 - Ruhpolding
7
IBU 7 - SVK
WCH - CZE
11
WC 8 - Sochi
6
7
8
30
51
WC2 - AUT
2
January
26
29
Rest week
50
IBU 1
WC 1
February
22
25
TT Challenge
28
Testival Canmore
(Field Testing)
August
September
21
Shooting camp
Canmore
27
July
October
20
Ski Technique
Canmore (TBD)
23
4
YJWCH - AUT (Obertilliach)
WC 6 - ITA
8
9
OECH - BUL
12
17
18
13
19
Nationals
Whistler
20 21 22 23
IBU Cup comp.
24
25
26
Jun comp.
27
28
29
30
31
Yearly planning instrument
Periodization rules
 Decide about season’s peak and other important races, than
work backwards
 Avoid consecutive flat weeks (same hours, same workouts),
try to always change the volume or intensity
 Regular resting periods
 Train hard, but remember good recovery!
 Health is # 1
 Who is feeling too good in summer, usually doesn’t race well
before January
Full Time Periodization
 General Preparatory (8-9 weeks)
 Specific 1 (8-9 weeks)
 Competitive DL (2-3 weeks)
 Specific 2 (6-7 weeks)
 Competitive 1 (10-11 weeks)
 Competitive 2 (8-9 weeks)
 Transition (4-6 weeks)
Important
 Allow athletes to excel at school
 Set up priorities / time lines
 Health is the Number 1 issue
 Keep positive attitude
 Athletes need positive motivation from success (!)
 Develop the whole person (Physical + mental development)
 Do not specialize too early (some Phys-ed programs are not
reliable for teaching good motoric skills)
Specific vs. Non-Specific
training
 People are born to walk, they need a break from skiing
 Controlled sun exposure is important for human body,
constant winter is not the best
 All the top teams in the world are building general
endurance and strength with non-specific activities
 Work your inner muscles first (core stability), before
you put on your “beach” muscles
Compensating
 Many athletes are used to compensate for their
weaknesses, rather than trying to improve them
 Many athletes develop over-use injuries in the Youth /
Junior age, when they want to become serious athletes
and they will increase their training volume. They didn’t
build proper fitness base in younger age, usually
because they were more talented and didn’t need to
work hard.
 Poor shots are compensating with fast skiing, while
good shots can hide poor skiing performance.
Give them clear goals
Road map to success - Performance on demand in Biathlon
Canmore Nordic Centre
30+30
Points
total
Av.%
Sulphur
3 jumps (m)
Pull ups
Sit ups 1'
DP Norquay
Uphill ski Norquay
Uphill RS Canmore
RS Biathlon
Total
Uphill
Roller ski
3000m
Strength
Bia test
Running
Precision
Shooting
10
510
530
95
25
9:00
3:30
28:30
8.50
35
45
20:30
18:00
10:15
22:30
9
505
520
94
26
9:05
3:35
29:00
8.40
34
44
20:45
18:30
10:30
23:00
8
500
505
92
27
9:10
3:40
30:00
8.30
32
43
21:15
19:15
10:45
23:45
7
490
495
91
28
9:20
3:50
31:30
8.20
30
42
22:00
20:00
11:15
24:30
6
485
485
90
30
9:30
4:00
33:00
8.00
28
40
23:00
21:00
11:45
25:30
5
480
475
85
31
9:45
4:15
34:00
7.8
25
35
24:00
21:45
12:15
26:00
4
475
455
80
32
10:00
4:30
35:00
7.6
21
31
25:30
22:45
12:45
26:30
3
470
410
77
35
10:15
4:45
37:00
7.4
17
27
27:00
24:00
13:30
27:00
2
465
360
75
37
10:30
5:05
38:30
7.2
14
24
28:30
25:30
14:30
28:30
1
450
300
70
40
10:50
5:30
41:00
7
10
21
30:30
27:30
15:45
30:15
Races
Time
aver.
Motivation
Athletes should enjoy the journey,
not just the destination!

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