Downloadable PowerPoint - Florida Center for Reading Research

Report
Reading Coach Guidance
1
FRA Conference
September 11, 2010
Cari Miller, Deputy Director
District Reading Coach
Guidance/Workshops
 Role of the Coach District Workshops to:
 Provide the history/research/data on Coaches
in Florida
 District and School Systems to Support the
Role of the Coach
 Role of the Reading Coach
History of Reading Coaches in Florida
2002- 2003- 2004- 2005- 2006- 2007- 2008- 200903
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05
06
07
08
09
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318
400
770
2056 2314 2560 2382 2441
Florida’s reading coach initiative began in 20022003 and increased dramatically in the 20052006 school year with the implementation of the
FEFP Reading Allocation.
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Florida’s Investment in the Reading Coach
Model:
The state of Florida has invested heavily in the
reading coach model believing that coaches
providing embedded professional development can
positively impact student achievement in reading.
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Reading Guidance Workshop
Goals:
Improve Coach Effectiveness
Increase Student Achievement
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Research on Florida
Coaches
RAND Study
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Rand Study Key Findings
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Coaches’ quality, particularly their ability to support adult
learners, is positively related to several outcomes and viewed
by some as an area of potential weakness.
The day-to-day work of coaches took many forms.
District and school administrators, coaches and teachers
identified several barriers constraining coaches’ ability and
opportunity to provide instructional support to many
teachers.
The most frequently mentioned characteristic of successful
coaches was “people skills” –interpersonal skills.
Key Findings (continued)
Most coaches viewed school and district administrators as key
supporters for their work.

Many teachers and principals reported that the coach had
positive effects on them and their schools.

The frequency with which coaches reviewed assessment data
with teachers was associated with positive outcomes.
 The number of years a school had a coach was
significantly related to higher reading test scores.

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The Rand Study – Recommendations
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Provide guidance to school administrators in how to identify
high-quality coach candidates.
Develop a pipeline of qualified candidates.
Consider offering incentives and support to attract highquality coaches and retain them over time.
If the intent is for coaches to work with all teachers, address
barriers to working across the content areas.
Continue to nurture school administrator support.
Recommendations (continued)
 Continue research on coaching.
 Continue professional development for coaches with
some adjustments. (More support is needed in how to
support adult learners).
 Encourage coaches to review assessment data with
teachers (data discussions, data conferencing)
 Address barriers to enable coaches to work more with
teachers including one-on-one work.
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A Coach’s Time
Making every moment count!
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Reading Coach Log Breakdown by
Recommended Categories
 Recommended Categories Include:
 Small Group PD
 Modeling Lessons
 Coach-Teacher Conferences
 Coaching
 Data Analysis
Recommended categories –
75% or more of the Reading Coach’s schedule
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Region 1 Reading Coach Log Report –
2009-10 School Year
Recommended categories –
Should equal 75% or more of
Reading Coach schedule.
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Region 2 Reading Coach Log Report –
2009-10 School Year
Recommended categories –
Should equal 75% or more of
Reading Coach schedule.
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Region 3 Reading Coach Log Report –
2009-10 School Year
Recommended categories –
Should equal 75% or more of
Reading Coach schedule.
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Region 4 Reading Coach Log Report –
2009-10 School Year
Recommended categories –
Should equal 75% or more of
Reading Coach schedule.
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Region 5 Reading Coach Log Report –
2009-10 School Year
Recommended categories –
Should equal 75% or more of
Reading Coach schedule.
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Reading Coach Log Breakdown by
Recommended Categories
 Recommended: 75% of Reading Coach Time
 Region 1 – 41%
 Region 2 – 34%
 Region 3 – 37%
 Region 4 – 40%
 Region 5 – 45%
 State Average – 39%
*All Schools Within Region
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Use of a Coach’s time
Based on the data shared:
What do you believe to be the barriers to
coaches using their time most effectively?
How do we remove these barriers to ensure
the coach’s time is used for maximum
benefit?
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District and School
Systems to Support the
Role of the Coach
District and School Systems to
Support the Role of the Reading
Coach
 The Principal/Coach Relationship
 Recruiting and Hiring Practices
 Reading Coach Training
 Monitoring/Evaluation Procedures
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The Principal/Coach Relationship
 The principal/coach relationship is critical to the
development and implementation of specific duties of the
coach.
 Principals and coaches should work together to build a
shared literacy vision and collaborative relationship to
improve instruction and student achievement (Casey, 2006;
Puig and Froelich, 2007).
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Killion and Harrison
Partnership agreements are a form of
contract or mutual agreement between a
coach and his or her principal.
The agreements typically are about the scope
of the work, expected results, and other
details associated with the coach’s work
with individuals or teams.
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Reading Clarify the Coach’s Role
Please read p. 4-5 of the “Clarify the Coach’s Role” , Handout 1.
Once completed, rank order (from most important to least
important) each partnership agreement category with your
table group.
Share Out!
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Reflect…
 What partnership agreements do you and your
principal have in place?
 Based on your reading and the examples
provided, how could these agreements be
improved?
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State Board Rule
from 6A-6.053 K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan.
 The reading/literacy coach will serve as a stable resource for
professional development throughout a school to generate
improvement in reading and literacy instruction and student
achievement.
 Coaches will support and provide initial and ongoing professional
development to teachers in:
 Each of the major reading components, as needed, based on an analysis of
student performance data;
 Administration and analysis of instructional assessments; and
 Differentiated instruction and intensive intervention.
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State Board Rule
from 6A-6.053 K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan.
 Coaches will: (continued)
 Work with all teachers (including ESE, content area, and elective areas) in
the school they serve, prioritizing their time to those teachers, activities,
and roles that will have the greatest impact on student achievement,
namely coaching and mentoring in classrooms;
 Work frequently with students in whole and small group instruction in the
context of modeling and coaching in other teachers’ classrooms;
 Not be asked to perform administrative functions that will confuse their
role for teachers; and
 Spend limited time administering or coordinating assessments.
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Reading Coach Role – Four
Components
 Establish an unyielding belief and sense of urgency
for literacy learning school wide
 Building capacity for literacy across the curriculum
 Enhancing and refining reading instruction and intervention
 Targeting instructional coaching using data and the gradual
release model
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Establish an unyielding belief and sense of urgency
for literacy learning school wide
 Serving on an active Reading Leadership Team
(RLT)
 The RLT meets at least once a month to determine areas
of concern in reading at the school through reviews of
data and create and implement a plan of action to
address needs
 Develops a plan to establish literacy practices
school-wide
 Works to analyze data to determine overall professional
development needs of the school
 Analyzes and shares school-wide data to provide training
in strategies and targeted coaching support
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READ Posters
The area of concern for
this school was that
students were not
reading above and
beyond assigned texts.
These activities were
part of the plan of action
to motivate students to
read and put books in the
hands of students.
Reading Wall of Fame
Literacy Plan of Action
Handout 5
How can this document support RLT
Action Planning for the school year?
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Reading Coach Role – Four
Components
 Establish an unyielding belief and sense of urgency for
literacy learning school wide
 Building capacity for literacy across the curriculum
 Enhancing and refining reading instruction and
intervention
 Targeting instructional coaching using data and the gradual
release model
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Enhancing and refining reading instruction
and intervention
 Reading coaches enhance and refine reading
instruction and intervention by:
 Ensuring effective student placement and support.
 Assisting in the interpretation of progress
monitoring and other data.
 Assisting teachers in implementing explicit,
systematic and rigorous reading instruction
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A Dilemma: Percent of Previous Level 3 Students
Regressing in 2008-2009 in DA Schools
For Discussion Purposes: A Possible Reading Intervention Decision Process
Handout 7
Is Instruction Rigorous Enough?
 All students read one book every two weeks while
receiving feedback from adults
 All students respond to complex questions in writing
and receive feedback from teachers
 All teachers have a deep knowledge and
understanding of the new FCAT Item Specifications
as they relate to developing complex thinking
questions aligned with the rigor of the FCAT Item
Specifications
2009 FCAT Item Specifications
 http://fcat.fldoe.org/fcatis01.asp
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Enhancing and refining reading
instruction and intervention
Reading Comprehension Resolution
 As a reading teacher, I will do the following when working with students
reading text in my classroom:
1) I will read text selections before the students so that I can encourage
them to find the explicit and implied meanings and author’s purpose,
particularly of difficult texts. LA.910.1.7.2, LA.910.1.7.3
2) I will be purposeful in building background knowledge, so that my focus
is connecting my students to the most important and relevant aspects of
the text. LA.910.1.7.3
3) I will not distract students during reading by focusing attention on
obscure words or unimportant details, but I will keep a spotlight on the
essential ideas in the text. LA.910.1.7.3
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Reading Comprehension Resolutions
continued…….
4) I will make my students do the work by not spoon feeding them
what a text says, but making them find the meaning on their own
through summarizing and paraphrasing in their own words and
pushing them to think deeper about the meaning and structure of the
text. LA.910.1.7.3, LA.910.1.7.4, LA.910.1.7.5
5) I will work with students to revisit texts by going back to earlier
ideas as we read new texts and discussing similar and contrasting
themes and characters. LA.910.1.7.7
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Oral Reading Strategies
Source: Good-Bye Round Robin 25 Effective Oral Reading Strategies
Oral Reading: Think Alouds
Teachers verbalizes their thoughts while reading
aloud
Modeling and demonstrating what good readers do
 questioning the text
 self monitoring through rereading
 Linking what is being read to prior knowledge
Source: adapted from: Good-bye Round Robin by Opitz & Rasinski
Think Alouds
 Once the teacher has completed reading orally, and thinking aloud,
invite students to add their thoughts.
 Pair up students and have them practice the procedure with one
another. Students take turns reading and responding to the other.
 Ask students to use the procedure when they are reading silently.
Students can use a form or a bookmark to remind themselves of what
they need to be doing to ensure comprehension and to evaluate
themselves.
Source: Good-bye Round Robin by Opitz & Rasinski
Think Aloud form or bookmark
How Did I Do When Reading?
NEVER
1. I made predictions.
2. I was able to form a picture in my mind.
3. I made connections.
4. I knew when I was having problems
5. I did something to fix my problems.
SOMETIMES
A LOT
Strategies for Oral Reading
And Fluency
Read Handout 9
What potential do you see for these strategies
to improve reading instruction in your school?
What would a coach have to do to make these
practices work for their school?
Enhancing and refining reading instruction
and intervention
 What are some strategies that need to be employed
by coaches to enhance and refine reading
instruction and intervention?
 Consider:
 Rigor of Instruction
 Comprehension
 Oral Reading
 Table group discussion
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To Review…
 The following must occur for reading coaches to
substantially impact student achievement:
 The role of the coach must be clearly delineated
 The principal/coach relationship must be strong
 Coaches must be selected carefully
 Coaches must be supported
 Coaches must MAKE the time to COACH
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“Find a Book, Florida”
“Find a Book, Florida”
“Find a Book, Florida”
“Find a Book, Florida”
Exit Slip
 Right down three ideas heard today that you will
implement in your role as a reading coach to ensure
improved teacher practice and student achievement
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Questions?
Thank You!
Contact Information:
Just Read, Florida!
850-245-0503
[email protected]
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