lec 5Public Goods and Common Resources - U

Report
Public Goods and Common
Resources
Introduction
• We consume many goods without paying:
parks, national defense, clean air & water.
• When goods have no prices, the market forces
that normally allocate resources are absent.
• The private market may fail to provide the
socially efficient quantity of such goods.
Characteristics of the Goods
• A good is excludable if a person can be prevented from
using it.
• A good is rival in consumption if one person’s
use of it diminishes others’ use.
• A public good is a commodity for which use of a good
by one agent does not preclude its use by other agents.
Rival in consumption?
Yes
No
Private Goods
Club Goods
Yes
§ ice-cream cones
§ garbage
§ congested toll roads
Excludabl
e?
Common Resources
§ fire protection
§ cable TV
§ uncongested toll
roads
Public Goods
No
§ fish in the ocean
§ the environment
§ congested nontoll roads
§ national defense
§ knowledge
§ uncongested nontoll
roads
Categorizing roads
• A road is which of the four kinds of goods?
• Hint: The answer depends on whether the
road is congested or not, and whether it’s a
toll road or not. Consider the different cases.
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Answers
• Rival in consumption? Only if congested.
• Excludable? Only if a toll road.
Four possibilities:
Uncongested non-toll road: public good
Uncongested toll road: natural monopoly
Congested non-toll road: common resource
Congested toll road: private good
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Notes on public vs. private goods
• Private goods can be publicly provided:
education, public health program, welfare
program
• Public goods can be privately provided:
lobbying, protection system, newspaper, The
Nature Conservancy
Free Rider Problem
• Public goods and common resources are difficult
for private markets to provide because of the
free-rider problem.
• Free rider: a person who receives the benefit of
a good but avoids paying for it
– If good is not excludable, people have incentive to be
free riders, because firms cannot prevent non-payers
from consuming the good.
• Result: The good is not produced, even if buyers
collectively value the good higher than the cost of
providing it.
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The Tragedy of the Commons
• A parable that illustrates why common resources get
used more than is socially desirable.
• Setting: a medieval town where sheep graze on
common land.
• As the population grows, the # of sheep grows.
• The amount of land is fixed,
the grass begins to disappear from overgrazing.
• The private incentives (using the land for free)
outweigh the social incentives (using it carefully).
• Result: People can no longer raise sheep.
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Easter Island Mystery
• “The stone images at first caused us to be
struck with astonishment, because we could
not comprehend how it was possible that
these people, who are devoid of heavy thick
timber for making any machines, as well as
strong ropes, nevertheless had been able to
erect such images, which were fully 30 feet
high and thick in proportion.” –Jacob
Reggeveen
EXTERNALITIES
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Private Solutions to Externalities and
Common Resources
• The Coase theorem:
If private parties can costlessly bargain over
the allocation of resources, they can solve the
externalities problem on their own by given
property rights.
EXTERNALITIES
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The Coase Theorem: An Example
Dick owns a dog named Spot.
Negative externality:
Spot’s barking disturbs Jane,
Dick’s neighbor.
The socially efficient outcome
maximizes Dick’s + Jane’s well-being.
– If Dick values having Spot more
than Jane values peace & quiet,
the dog should stay.
Coase theorem: The private market will reach the
efficient outcome on its own…
EXTERNALITIES
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The Coase Theorem: An Example
• CASE 1:
Dick has the right to keep Spot.
Benefit to Dick of having Spot = $500
Cost to Jane of Spot’s barking = $800
• Socially efficient outcome:
Spot goes bye-bye.
• Private outcome:
Jane pays Dick $600 to get rid of Spot,
both Jane and Dick are better off.
• Private outcome = efficient outcome.
EXTERNALITIES
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The Coase Theorem: An Example
• CASE 2:
Dick has the right to keep Spot.
Benefit to Dick of having Spot = $1000
Cost to Jane of Spot’s barking = $800
• Socially efficient outcome:
See Spot stay.
• Private outcome:
Jane not willing to pay more than $800,
Dick not willing to accept less than $1000,
so Spot stays.
• Private outcome = efficient outcome.
EXTERNALITIES
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The Coase Theorem: An Example
• CASE 3:
Jane has the legal right to peace & quiet.
Benefit to Dick of having Spot = $800
Cost to Jane of Spot’s barking = $500
• Socially efficient outcome: Dick keeps Spot.
• Private outcome: Dick pays Jane $600 to put up with
Spot’s barking.
• Private outcome = efficient outcome.
The private market achieves the efficient outcome
regardless of the initial distribution of rights.
EXTERNALITIES
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Samuelson Rule
• At the optimal level of the public good the
sum of consumers’ MB from the public good is
set equal to its MC.
Benefit
Person A
a
o
Benefit
Quantity
Person B
b
o
Benefit
oa+ob
ob
oa
Quantity
Market Demand
MC
Quantity
Applying Coase
Collectively, the 1000 residents of Green Valley
value swimming in Blue Lake at $100,000.
A nearby factory pollutes the lake water, and
would have to pay $50,000 for non-polluting
equipment.
A. Describe a Coase-like private solution.
B. Can you think of any reasons why this solution
might not work in the real world?
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Why Private Solutions Do Not Always Work
1.
2.
3.
Transaction costs:
The costs parties incur in the process of
agreeing to and following through on a bargain.
These costs may make it impossible to reach a
mutually beneficial agreement.
Stubbornness:
Even if a beneficial agreement is possible,
each party may hold out for a better deal.
Coordination problems:
If # of parties is very large, coordinating them
may be costly, difficult, or impossible.
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