Teens Drive Smart Survey

Report
Florida Statistics
April 2012
• Road Map:
– Research Purpose & Methodology
– Summary
– Detailed Findings
– How Dangerous Is….?
– How Distracting Is….?
– How Often Do You Engage In….?
– Bottom Line
• Research Purpose:
Bridgestone Americas, Inc.,
working through DVL, wished
to develop and execute a
survey to help them better
understand the driving habits
and behaviors of young drivers
(ages 15 to 21). Of particular
importance here is the issue of
distracted driving,
understanding how these
young drivers view the issue
and how frequently they
engage in distracted driving.
• Research Methodology:
Two approaches were considered – a phone survey or an online
survey. While phone surveys are a long-accepted research
methodology, 18- to 21-year-olds are the most likely segment to not
have a landline, and 16- to 17-year olds are notoriously difficult to
reach (plus we must gain parental approval to speak with them). This
younger age group is generally more inclined to prefer electronic
communication. Most importantly, it seems ethically questionable –
if not reckless – to conduct a survey about distracted driving over
the phone, knowing that a certain percentage of these participants
may, in fact, be driving distracted as they take the phone survey.
• Research Methodology:
Therefore, Prince Market Research recommended an online survey
approach with a sample size of 2,000 respondents drawn from an
online sample provided by a reputable online panel company.
The survey was fielded during March 12 – 19, 2012, garnering 2,012
completed responses, for an overall margin of error of ± 2.2%.
TEENS DRIVE SMART VIDEO CONTEST MEDIA RELATIONS
•Memorial Day Plan
• Research Sample for Texas:
Gender
• Female – 55%
• Male – 45%
Age
• Under 16 – 9%
• 16 to 17 – 31%
• 18 to 19 – 18%
• 20 to 21 – 42%
Total Number of
Respondents
• 100
Florida Statistics
April 2012
Summary of Findings:
•
75% of these respondents believe they are “very safe”; but only about
60% say their parents would agree with that assessment.
•
Florida teens believe they are safe because they pay attention and
follow the rules, but they also attribute it to the fact that they have not
had an accident or received a ticket.
•
These respondents admit that they are inexperienced drivers and that
they do not always obey the rules.
•
Florida teens readily acknowledge that driving under the influence of
alcohol or drugs is very dangerous. They view typing a text as less
dangerous than driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs, but
slightly more dangerous than driving without wearing a seatbelt.
•
Only a third of the respondents believe that talking on the phone while
driving is very dangerous.
Summary of Findings:
• Alcohol tops the list of distracters, followed closely by texting while
driving (both typing and reading). Eating, drinking (non-alcoholic
drinks), and playing music in the car are seen as much less
distracting activities to these teens.
• For the most part, teens seem to be minimizing the time they spend
engaging in activities they deem as most distracting, but they are by
no means abstaining. 25% of respondents admit to reading and
typing text messages at least occasionally while driving.
• Many of these respondents are in denial about their distracted
driving tendencies and do not believe they are truly at risk.
• 40% of respondents believe there is a law against texting
while driving in Florida or aren’t sure, yet 25% of them
admit to texting and driving.
Is texting and driving against the law in Florida?
24% 16%
Yes
No
60%
Don't Know
Florida Statistics
April 2012
• Texas teen drivers perceive themselves to be much safer
than their parents would likely rate them.
Do you think
you are…
Would your
Would you
parents tell
say your
us you are….
parents are:
1%
2%
2%
24%
30%
38%
75%
A Very Safe Driver
60%
A Somewhat Safe Driver
68%
Not a Very Safe Driver
Why do you think you’re a very safe driver?
•
I always wear seatbelts. I drive the posted speed limit. I am a defensive
driver.
•
I practice very good driving habits.
•
I follow speed limits and don’t drive crazy.
•
Never had an accident, never been pulled over, never a ticket and always
cautious and protective.
•
Cautious.
•
I just am.
Why do you think you’re a somewhat safe or
not a safe driver?
•
I still make some mistakes.
•
Because I don’t have much experience driving.
•
Sometimes I don’t pay attention.
•
I got in a car accident a couple of months ago. I can’t speak that highly
of my driving skills.
•
I take a few risks.
When asked to rate their parents driving –68% of respondents
considered their parents very safe drivers, but admitted their Mom
or Dad were often distracted behind the wheel.
•
Drives fast.
•
Never been in an accident that was their fault.
•
They sometimes drive fast.
•
My mom occasionally texts while she drives.
•
When they get angry, they tend to speed.
•
Stops abruptly and has had several accidents and tickets.
• Overall, respondents view texting as less dangerous than
driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs, but
slightly more dangerous than not wearing a seat belt.
How safe or dangerous is….?
Driver That is Reading a
Text While Driving
Driver That is Typing a
Text While Driving
73%
20%
88%
7%
Driving While Under the
Influence of Drugs
90%
4%
Driving While Under the
Influence of Alcohol
92%
2%
Very Dangerous
Relatively Dangerous
• Other things like talking on the phone or changing music
in the car is seen by this group as less distracting.
How safe or dangerous is….?
Changing Music Selection While Driving
Driver That is Talking on the Phone
While Driving
Not Wearing a Seat Belt
10%
34%
30%
44%
71%
81%
Driving While Under the Influence of
Marijuana
Very Dangerous
23%
7%
Somewhat Dangerous
• Alcohol tops the list of distracters, followed closely by
texting while driving (both typing and reading). Eating,
drinking and playing music in the car are seen as much
less distracting activities to these teens.
How distracting is….?
When I Am Eating While Driving
When I Am Reading a Text While
Driving
23%
65%
69%
When I Am Typing a Text While
Driving
83%
When I Am Driving Under the
Influence of Alcohol
87%
Very Distracting
29%
14%
8%
Somewhat Distracting
• For the most part, teens seem to be minimizing the time
they spend engaging in activities they deem as most
distracting, but they are not abstaining.
When you are driving, how often do you engage in…
1% 6%
43%
Eating
Reading a Text
Typing a Text
Driving Under the Influence of Alcohol
1% 6%
1%
25%
6%
16%
1%
2%
Almost All The Time
About Half the Time
Occasionally
Florida Statistics
April 2012
• Many respondents are in denial about their distracted
driving tendencies and do not believe they are truly at
risk.
Given that driving while distracted can be dangerous, why do you do it?
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
71% -- I take extra precautions to make sure I don’t get too distracted
52% -- I don’t believe I get too distracted while driving
17% -- I do it all the time and nothing has happened
13% -- I think I’m a much safer driver than everyone else
10% -- My parents do it
10% -- Everyone else does it
3% -- I don’t believe driving while distracted is really dangerous

similar documents